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Thread: Land use codes with health?

  1. #1
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    Land use codes with health?

    Good morning on a Friday!

    Does anyone know of LUC's that have "health" codes in them? Or better yet, the way I interpreted this request from the higher up, codes that are proactive in what is allowed that can be used for health.

    I.E Allowing more leniancy or flexibility with farmers markets, farm stands or other "alternative" means of food access.

    Perhaps even raising permitted livestock?

    I am looking but you never know what someone else may know. I am always open ears to learn.

    Thanks guys.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian
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    We amended our ZO to accomodate farmers markets which would otherwise have been prohibited. Prior to the amendment the reg's specified that all commercial activity must be conducted within an enclosed building except for auto service stations.

    While the amendatory Ordinance contained some references to health, sustainability, etc. in the "whereases" the ZO contains no such references.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian cng's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by northam01 View post
    Good morning on a Friday!

    Does anyone know of LUC's that have "health" codes in them? Or better yet, the way I interpreted this request from the higher up, codes that are proactive in what is allowed that can be used for health.

    I.E Allowing more leniancy or flexibility with farmers markets, farm stands or other "alternative" means of food access.

    Perhaps even raising permitted livestock?

    I am looking but you never know what someone else may know. I am always open ears to learn.

    Thanks guys.
    Land use planning has been discussed in the context of health through the provision of environments that promote an active lifestyle, like trails for walking. Other than that, more directly-related health issues in planning documents may include animal regulations, and farmers markets, as you mentioned. Lately, I had the opportunity to work with someone proposing a live poultry market, and while this type of use definitely has land use impacts, I was able to add additional conditions (while not regulated in our zoning code) pertaining to compliance with state and county agricultural/food health and safety codes.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by northam01 View post
    Does anyone know of LUC's that have "health" codes in them? Or better yet, the way I interpreted this request from the higher up, codes that are proactive in what is allowed that can be used for health.
    Good question. IME you are looking for sustainability plans or 'community health' or some such in Comp Plans, and then once you have some sort of wording in your comp plan, you can justify some changes in LUC to be compliant with the comp plan. The EPA is working on it and you may want to poke around their site and see where they are today.

    Other than having short blocks, mid-block crossings, mixed-use, denser, more greenery, wider sidewalks, transit access, non-cookie cutter buildings, street trees and all that, I'm not sure the public health profession is to a point where their recommendations for LU changes have been codifed into policy that can be pointed to for copying.

    That is: the generalities are there, but the specific detail for code isn't. AFAICT at this point. Happy to be shown to be wrong as I can use that for what I'm doing these days.

  5. #5
    I've heard that a number of California communities are adopting health elements as part of their general plans. I heard a whole list of them rattled off fairly rapidly. The only city I remember for sure is Richmond, CA but there may be a statewide initiative?

  6. #6
    NIMBY asshatterer Plus Richmond Jake's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Gotta Speakup View post
    I've heard that a number of California communities are adopting health elements as part of their general plans. I heard a whole list of them rattled off fairly rapidly. The only city I remember for sure is Richmond, CA but there may be a statewide initiative?
    Off-topic:
    It's my understanding that it's an optional element in their General Plan. But trust me, the greatest threat to public health in Richmond are small lead projectiles.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian cng's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Gotta Speakup View post
    I've heard that a number of California communities are adopting health elements as part of their general plans. I heard a whole list of them rattled off fairly rapidly. The only city I remember for sure is Richmond, CA but there may be a statewide initiative?
    Do a web search for California Office of Planning and Research (or OPR), 2010 Book of Lists. It lists all the California jurisdictions and which ones have adopted optional General Plan elements, like public health.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally posted by RichmondJake View post
    Off-topic:
    It's my understanding that it's an optional element in their General Plan. But trust me, the greatest threat to public health in Richmond are small lead projectiles.
    I know you meant it as a joke,but actually, more people die from exposure to the pollution from the refineries in the area than from violence.

  9. #9
    NIMBY asshatterer Plus Richmond Jake's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Gotta Speakup View post
    I know you meant it as a joke,but actually, more people die from exposure to the pollution from the refineries in the area than from violence.
    No, didn't mean it as a joke. Yes, Chevron and General Chemical need to take responsibly for their behaviors. It's a social justice issue.

    I worked for that city. Each time I went home from a night meeting was an adventure. Some links to confirm my opinion.

    http://www.contracostatimes.com/richmond/ci_16659087

    http://www.contracostatimes.com/richmond/ci_16641010

    http://os.cqpress.com/citycrime/2009...Population.pdf

  10. #10
    Quote Originally posted by RichmondJake View post
    No, didn't mean it as a joke. Yes, Chevron and General Chemical need to take responsibly for their behaviors. It's a social justice issue.

    I worked for that city. Each time I went home from a night meeting was an adventure. Some links to confirm my opinion.

    http://www.contracostatimes.com/richmond/ci_16659087

    http://www.contracostatimes.com/richmond/ci_16641010

    http://os.cqpress.com/citycrime/2009...Population.pdf
    There were 47 homicide sin Richmond in 2007

    The EPA estimates that 10% of heart attack deaths are attributable to particulates. The 2007 national death rate from heart attacks was about 250 per hundred thousand so if Richmond had average air pollution it would have 25 heart attacks due to pollution a year. But it has some of the worst air in the US so you could reasonably have 50 heart attacks due to its air quality a year. Add in cancer? and you would have more deaths.

    So again, air pollution kills more people in Richmond than violence.

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