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Thread: Commercial vehicles in residential districts

  1. #1
    Cyburbian SW MI Planner's avatar
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    Commercial vehicles in residential districts

    How do you regulate commercial vehicles in residential districts? Our current ordinance says that no more than one commercial vehicle not exceeding one ton capacity is allowed on a parcel. Somewhere else it says that semi tractors are allowed, but not the trailer.

    We are revising our ordinance to better address these issues, but not sure how to do it? Do we want to use capacity, gross vehicle, # of axles, etc.? On the other hand, if people work say for Frito Lay, shouldn't they be able to park their vehicle in their driveway at night? What restrictions would be reasonable?

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Otis's avatar
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    We do it sort of indirectly by saying that there can't be the appearance of a business at a residentially zoned property. So one Frito truck that a resident uses in his or her work is OK. More than one is a Frito parking lot, which is not allowed in the zone.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    at a previous town i worked in, this is what they had and it seemed to work as i remember:

    Parking one commercial vehicle together with any trailer attached to that vehicle used by a resident of that premises in connection with his/her occupation, provided that:

    (1) The vehicle does not exceed 12,000 pounds (lb.) gross vehicle weight including any trailer;

    (2) The vehicle is not considered a construction apparatus (for example, tractor, backhoe, or crane);

    (3) The vehicle is not loaded in whole or in part with noxious, flammable, dangerous, or offensive materials or liquids.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian iamme's avatar
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    Milwaukee regulates this by limiting it to one vehicle per property and just mandates that the vehicle is less than 22ft in length. This isn't very picky but it's easier to enforce.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Paraphrased from the Toffeenosed HOA regs my folks live under:

    If it cannot fit into your garage, park it elsewhere.
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  6. #6
    Quote Originally posted by Otis
    We do it sort of indirectly by saying that there can't be the appearance of a business at a residentially zoned property. So one Frito truck that a resident uses in his or her work is OK. More than one is a Frito parking lot, which is not allowed in the zone.
    This is pretty much what we do.

    Unfortunately, we have a few Mr. & Mrs. School Bus Drivers that drive the kids, the neighbors and the planning staff nuts when both buses are parked in the driveway at night.
    On pitching to Stan Musial:
    "Once he timed your fastball, your infielders were in jeopardy."
    Warren Spahn

  7. #7
    Cyburbian GeoTech's avatar
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    Our code limits the weight to 10,000 lbs. gross and one rear axle in the Residential Single-Family Zoning District.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by zmanPLAN
    Paraphrased from the Toffeenosed HOA regs my folks live under:

    If it cannot fit into your garage, park it elsewhere.
    what do you do about boats?

  9. #9
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by zmanPLAN
    Paraphrased from the Toffeenosed HOA regs my folks live under:

    If it cannot fit into your garage, park it elsewhere.
    Like...in your driveway?

  10. #10
    Cyburbian ssc's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by luckless pedestrian
    what do you do about boats?
    Believe it or not, we allow boats on trailers to be left in on-street parking spaces ALL WINTER!

    However, we only allow one commercial vehicle per property in a residential zone....

  11. #11
    Cyburbian GeoTech's avatar
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    We include boats in our definition of recreational vehicle and regulate the location, screening, and number of them on any lot.

    Quote Originally posted by luckless pedestrian
    what do you do about boats?

  12. #12
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Off-topic:
    Quote Originally posted by luckless pedestrian
    what do you do about boats?
    Only idiots have boats in the Denver area....

    Signed,

    A Former boat owning idiot formerly of Denver.

    ACTUALLY, this neighborhood is made up of folks who if they owned a boat, they would be able to put it into storage or it would be moored someplace uppity.

    Quote Originally posted by savemattoon
    Like...in your driveway?
    Well, therein lies the rub (oh God, did I really say that?) Your hard pressed to find someone who cannot fit their pimped out Suburban or F-250 Lariat into their three or four car garage. A Land Rover can fit into them, as well as a Mercedes M-Class, BMW X-5, or Hummer H-whatever. They just want to keep the riff-raff like my pops who drives his base model F-250 work truck home for lunch during the day.
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  13. #13
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ssc
    Believe it or not, we allow boats on trailers to be left in on-street parking spaces ALL WINTER!

    However, we only allow one commercial vehicle per property in a residential zone....
    welcome to maine!

  14. #14
    Cyburbian imaplanner's avatar
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    We just say that commercial uses are not allowed in residential zones- and as the commercial vehicle is part of a commercial use it is not allowed.

  15. #15
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
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    I can't believe I am waxing poetic today about my old job, but here is how we did it. One commercial vvehicle per property was permitted. We did this by checking the license plates. We also did it through the home occupation rules.
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

  16. #16
    Cyburbian imaplanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by donk
    I can't believe I am waxing poetic today about my old job, but here is how we did it. One commercial vvehicle per property was permitted. We did this by checking the license plates. We also did it through the home occupation rules.
    that wasn't very poetic

  17. #17
          Shweethaht's avatar
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    Well the real question is...

    How do you regulate it without law enforcement?
    A little squirelly weavy curb and bollard action will take care of anything over 22'. That, however will mess with Aunt Doreen and Uncle Hank in parking the Frankenstein-sized Winnebago out front when they visit, not to mention the moving semi when it comes to pick up all of my Frankenstein-sized drafting table.

  18. #18
    Cyburbian developmentguru's avatar
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    I started to begin a new thread on this subject, until I found this one. Here's my thing - we are often approached with great suspicion because we currently interpret home occupation regulations in a way that does not prevent Mr. Plumber from parking his truck at home during the evening, Mr. Frito Lay from parking his van at the house when not stocking vending machines, Ms. Owner of a Cleaning Service from her fancy Escalade with the magnetic sign from parking that at home, Mr. Landscaper from parking his truck and trailer at the house, or Mr. Mobile Ice Cream Vendor from parking his van at home when not operating. Am I missing something obvious, or is there a more creative way to strictly regulate these in residential neighborhoods? Our current code says 3 tons and up is a commercial vehicle. Is there a way to clean up neighborhoods a little better without infringing on rights? I don't know...would love to hear thoughts on this.

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