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Thread: Planning and designing for cold climates

  1. #1

    Planning and designing for cold climates

    Hey,
    The Subject is : Climate and Urban Planning Studies. Case Study is : Cold Climate.
    Climate responsive urban design studies-examples in cold climates. I've chosen the city of Toronto. But it can be changed. I tried to find documents so much so far but i can't find anything. Waiting for some help.

    Regards
    Merry Christmas
    Oya

  2. #2
    Cyburbian mgk920's avatar
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    I'd aim even colder - places like Duluth, MN/Superior, WI, USA (small city); Fargo, ND, USA (small city); the Minneapolis/Saint Paul, MN, USA area (big city); Winnipeg, MB, Canada (mid-sized city); Edmonton, AB, Canada (booming mid-sized to large city) or even Fairbanks, AK, USA (small town). All of these have winter low temps that regularly get below -25C. Fairbanks regularly gets down to -40C and colder. It is normal for Chicago to have a few winter lows deep into the -20sC every year, too.

    Some examples of climate-context design include the extensive skywalk and/or pedestrian tunnel networks in the downtown areas of some of these cities (ie, Toronto, Duluth, Minneapolis and Saint Paul), *HUGE* shopping malls with much more to do than just shop (Edmonton and suburban Minneapolis), domed sports stadia, etc. Many employers in the Fargo area (and much of the rest of the northern plains) have places to plug automobile engine block heaters in in their employee parking lots. Other such examples abound.

    Good luck.

    Mike

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Linda_D's avatar
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    I think that the problems with snow removal due to the recent storms in NYC and Philly should be considered. Big cities need to deal with plowing streets blocked by abandoned cars and with cars parked on both sides as well as what to do with all the snow. I believe that NYC may dump it into the river.

    Toronto really doesn't get as cold as the places that Mike mentioned (it sits on Lake Ontario, which seldom freezes over the winter and so moderates temps a bit), nor does it get as much snow as near-by Buffalo nor suffer from serious snowstorms as often as Boston, NYC, and Philly do. In other words, it might not be the best example.

    Montreal might be a better choice as it is colder than Toronto if you are looking for a large Canadian city.

  4. #4
    Any project that done for Montreal or other cities? This study wont contain only my considerations. Need some projects. Plans etc.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by mgk920 View post
    I'd aim even colder - places like Duluth, MN/Superior, WI, USA (small city); Fargo, ND, USA (small city); the Minneapolis/Saint Paul, MN, USA area (big city); Winnipeg, MB, Canada (mid-sized city); Edmonton, AB, Canada (booming mid-sized to large city) or even Fairbanks, AK, USA (small town). All of these have winter low temps that regularly get below -25C. Fairbanks regularly gets down to -40C and colder. It is normal for Chicago to have a few winter lows deep into the -20sC every year, too.
    Edmonton and Cheyenne, WY (and others) have street grids tilted 23.5 off the equator, allowing sun to strike pavement in winter and melt snow/ice. Eastern US uses salt to de-ice roads, Intermountain West uses MgCl or some such - consequences are rusted automobiles in east, vegetation damage in west. Here in Intermountain West you can find examples of parking lot design that reserves areas for snow piles, and some cities require such designs.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian ThePinkPlanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ColoGI View post
    Edmonton and Cheyenne, WY (and others) have street grids tilted 23.5 off the equator, allowing sun to strike pavement in winter and melt snow/ice. E.
    Neat! I didn't know that.

  7. #7
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Streets in the Buffalo area have wide tree lawns, partly to provide a snow disposal area for snowplows. Speed bumps, speed humps, and other vertical traffic calming devices are also rare, because of the need to accommodate snow plows.

    Alleys are very rare in the Buffalo area, supposedly because of snow removal issues; there's no area to place plowed snow. There are many other unfortunate concessions made to snow removal in the Buffalo area, such as the lack of landscape islands in surface parking lots. I think it's an excuse developers make to cut costs.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  8. #8
    Cyburbian JimPlans's avatar
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    Check out the 1969 plan for Winnipeg, Manitoba. As I understand it, this is the plan that recommended the construction of the Winnipeg Walkway. Though the text has little detail on this the plan graphics were impressively 60-ish (though not online). In fact, research skywalks and underground cities generally. Both are common solutions (?) to the cold weather problem in urban areas.

    One issue I find in most cold climates is a lack of weather protection for transit riders at stops. I'm amazed that in a place that can get as hot in the summer and cold in the winter as Baltimore, virtually all light rail and bus stops are signs and/or platforms with no weatherproof enclosures to be found.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Dan View post
    Streets in the Buffalo area have wide tree lawns, partly to provide a snow disposal area for snowplows. Speed bumps, speed humps, and other vertical traffic calming devices are also rare, because of the need to accommodate snow plows....There are many other unfortunate concessions made to snow removal in the Buffalo area, such as the lack of landscape islands in surface parking lots. I think it's an excuse developers make to cut costs.
    Wide treelawns are an important feature for snow storage (for other OT things too). Nowadays you can argue for stormwater when putting in parking lot islands, as they support large trees that slow runoff as well as store snow. But there are costs to installing islands and peninsulas and you must make them code for them to be installed.

  10. #10
    what about china? is there any study-project about this kind of subjects in Harbin except http://ow.ly/3yHyE ?

    not so small scale. city scale studies are important. heating, energy coversation, maybe ecocity projects ??

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