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Thread: Undergrad with no practical experience looking for internship: urban, suburban, or rural?

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Greater Cleveland area
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    11

    Undergrad with no practical experience looking for internship: urban, suburban, or rural?

    Hello! I'm new to the cyburbia forums. I've come across the site several times through internet searches, and finally decided to actually join.

    I am a sophomore majoring in Urban Studies looking to intern with a planning department/city manager over the coming summer. I've compiled a list of cities I'd like to intern at, divided into the following categories:

    suburban
    suburbs riding the urban suburban line
    urban suburbs (inner ring suburbs)
    urban

    All in all, a total of 8 cities. In your opinion, from which would I learn the most, or rather gain a better understanding of the defining principles of city planning? Which do you think are more likely to take on an intern with little to no experience in the field?

  2. #2
    Member
    Registered
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    20

    Work for the private sector

    If you're an undergrad, I cannot recommend enough that you work for someone in the private sector, ideally in real estate development or consulting. This sort of internship will give you many more options once you start looking for work full time. In my experience, city planning departments, EDCs, and so on want to see someone who understands private sector supply and demand, real estate finance, and so on. In addition, an internship with a private sector firm will give you many more options as far as seeking future internships in allied fields, e.g. real estate, economic development consulting, city-oriented management consulting, etc.

    If you end up wanting to work with a planning department or municipal government, solid private-sector resume experience will help. And if you can't find a public-sector job when you graduate (a real possibility with all the budget cutting going on) you'll be in a better position to find work within the realm of your urban studies interests.

  3. #3
    Member
    Registered
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Greater Cleveland area
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    11
    Thanks for the advice! I will definitely look into some private sector firms. I've got a few (obviously unpaid) offers from some nearby suburbs, so we'll see... I'm also looking at some paid research plans (UT@Austin has a nice one)

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