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Thread: Transect regulation and target marketing

  1. #1
    Cyburbian
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    Transect regulation and target marketing

    ESRI offers "Tapestry" Population Segmentation ( www.ESRI.com/ZipCodeLookup ) that understands people as 65 groups or types. Each type is associated with an Urbanization Summary Group, which is the equivalent of a Transect Zone.



    While cars, oil, and freeways, as well as Euclidean zoning, have rendered much of the landscape in the United States as homogeneous suburban sprawl, Transect regulation based on knowledge about Tapestry Segments offers the chance for neighborhoods, cities, counties, and regions to better respond to the marketplace since each Tapestry Segment corresponds to an Urbanization Summary Group. Essentially, this approach is required to ensure populations are diversified and that sufficient housing is provided to meet the demand for specific Transect Zones and, more generally, for walkable, transit-oriented places.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Golly I am a 51, 32, 34.

    Ha! A lot this thing knows.. I don't drive a Buick.. I got a Mercury!

    Really this thing does not tell me much. Its just a re-hash of the clustering of america study done 20 years ago.
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  3. #3
    Cyburbian
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    PRIZM never associated population segments with a rural-to-urban transect, however.

    Essentially, I brought this topic to the attention of the planners here to potentially quantify the supply-and-demand problem related to certain Transect Zones.

    High rents in urban areas and around transit stations are largely a function of the shortage of these environments relative to demand. The numbers of Lattes and Laptops, Metro Renters, and Urban Chic, for example, seemingly outstrip available supplies of Principal Urban Centers I and Metro Cities I because so much of the existing housing supply has been built as single-family large-lot homes within homogeneous suburban sprawl.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian
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    I haven't studied this; in fact, this is my first exposure, but I tend to agree with DetroitPlanner. This seems like a re-hash of something that was lots of fun at first, but then rapidly faded into oblivion as trends changed.

    Please explain more about how this really relates to the rural-to-urban or urban-to-rural transect and tells us planners exactly how to get supply and demand into balance.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian
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    ESRI, for example, is headquartered in Redlands, California. And, the company knows that many of its current employees, as well as its potential recruits, which are among the most educated and highly-skilled populations, belong to Tapestry Segments that favor Principal Urban Centers I (U1). But, Redlands is located about 65-70 miles away from Los Angeles, the closest U1. So, ESRI has been an instrumental force in the planning for the City of San Bernardino, which lies about five miles away, to re-establish itself as southern California's third Urban Core, after both Los Angeles and San Diego.

    Southern California's automobile-oriented development patterns prevented San Bernardino from retaining its economic vitality as an Urban Core or a Principal Urban Center I. And, the result has been 50 years of suburban spawl throughout all six counties.

    If employers need recruits that prefer certain Urbanization Summary Groups or Transect Zones, then that fact should be understood by planners who seek to correct jobs-housing imbalances. If concentrations of poverty are inhibiting economic growth and are creating conditions for crime, then planners should be targeting Tapestry Segments that can provide better mixes of incomes. And, if affordable housing is difficult to find in Principal Urban Centers and Metro Cities, then planners should be responding to the shortage by creating more places that meet the demand generated by these groups, or Tapestry Segments, who are currently underserved. Transect-regulating plans, combined with investments in transit and other infrastructure, can provide planning agencies and governments the ability to do so.

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