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Thread: Archaeology field school for cultural resource planning

  1. #1

    Archaeology field school for cultural resource planning

    Hi all,
    I've been investigating some different realms of planning and have been finding a number of RFPs and job posts that deal with Cultural Resource management and planning.

    With a BA in Anthropology and a Masters in Urban Planning and Policy this seems to cross my educational spectrum; I don't, however, have much of any archaeology training and have never been to a field school. While I want to get more involved with cultural resources, I'm not really interested in the digging aspect of it, but a number of the jobs call for training in archaeology field methods even when the job description is mainly policy/planning related (i.e. NEPA documentation, cultural resource management planning, etc.)

    Does anyone know if there are any anthropology field schools or workshops designed for planners working in this area?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Cyburbian JimPlans's avatar
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    I'm aware of archaeology field schools (I have my eye on the one at UMaryland, though I don't know where I'd get the time to take six week off work in the summer), but I've never heard of one that specializes in training urban planners. In other words, I think the digging is unavoidable. On the bright side, slogging through dirt with picks and brushes is probably good training for slogging through NEPA environmental assessments.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian
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    Jobs in Cultural Resource Management do generally require field school training, even though an increasing number of them don't actually involve fieldwork and are really more like planning jobs than traditional archaeology jobs. As far as I know there aren't any field schools specifically tailored to people with a planning background, but there are a bunch of field schools out there so I'd suggest just picking one that's convenient for you. That and a BA in anthropology should put you in a pretty good position for jobs in CRM.

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    Cyburbian Bubba's avatar
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    Frankly, if you want to get into CRM without "digging", you'd be better served in taking a few seminars or classes and learing the regulatory side of things (NEPA and Section 106).
    Last edited by Bubba; 16 Jan 2011 at 2:43 PM.
    I found you a new motto from a sign hanging on their wall…"Drink coffee: do stupid things faster and with more energy"

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    Cyburbian Bubba's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Bubba View post
    Frankly, if you want to get into CRM without "digging", you'd be better served in taking a few seminars or classes and learing the regulatory side of things (NEPA and Section 106).
    Um, learning, that is...
    I found you a new motto from a sign hanging on their wall…"Drink coffee: do stupid things faster and with more energy"

  6. #6
    Thanks for your thoughts, all - kind of what I figured...
    Maybe I should become expert at NEPA and CRM and create a training program for planners... could be a good retirement job... look me up on +/-20 years.

  7. #7
    The subconsultants we used to do our cultural resources EIR sections were mostly small, independently-owned, sole-proprietor firms with an academically-oriented archeologist. In other words, they had either a PhD or decades of cultural resource experience, and this was just a side job for them.

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