Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Studying in Europe to work in Canada / U.S.

  1. #1

    Studying in Europe to work in Canada / U.S.

    (I'm reposting this in the correct forum)

    Hi,

    I have just completed my undergrad in Human Geography from UBC (Vancouver, Canada) and want to do a Masters in Planning.

    I have been accepted to the University of Amsterdam's Master of Urban and Regional Planning. This degree is completely in English and is one-year long.

    I was wondering what the reputation of having a masters degree from there would be?
    Also, how would that affect me from getting accreditation with the Canadian Institute of Planners (CIP) or APA?

    I would like to work in the future in Canada, the US or Australia. Would a degree from the Netherlands be looked down upon? I know the Netherlands has a good reputation in actual planning practice but don't know how their degrees would be viewed.

    Also, would this be a bad idea simply in terms of networking and making connections. I am too late to apply to programs in Canada, but should I just try to get some relevant work experience and apply to Canadian universities next year?

    Of course, I am really interested in studying in Europe and especially Amsterdam, but don't want to waste my time and money.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    27
    I'm sorry but this won't be useful to you (other than as a thread bump), but I just wanted to say:

    I'm very interested in the UvA program, mostly for it's focus on human geography. I understand that they used to have two separate programs for planning/human geography, but have since merged them -- for what should be a delightful combination. My only concerns are housing while I'm there (I'm reading it can be very difficult to find) and also the general concept of living in a foreign country (I've never done study abroad or anything like that).

    I suppose I can offer you this at least: there are urban design firms that are based in Europe but have offices in the U.S., Canada, and/or Australia (among other places), such as West8. So even though your degree isn't APA/CIP accredited, firms would recognize your skills.

  3. #3
    Thanks for the posting Josh. It does seem like a good program.
    The program I have applied and been accepted to is a Masters in Urban and Regional Planning (one-year program).
    There is also what they call a "Research Masters in Human Geography, Planning and Development" (two-year program), which is perhaps the one you are mentioning. Both programs are within the general faculty they call the Graduate School of Social Sciences, but I don't know how much of a geography overlap my program would have compared to others.

    Anyhow, thanks for the info.
    If anyone else knows anything about the UvA program, or how it is recognized abroad, please let me know.


    p.s. I lived in Amsterdam as a kid for about 5 years and I'm quite comfortable living abroad, so for me that's not issue. Also, I'm hoping to get into the student housing at UvA since renting can be tricky in Amsterdam.

  4. #4
    Hi there,

    wondering if you ended up enrolling in the master program in urban and regional planning at University of Amsterdam. I myself has been thinking of applying to this particular one-year program.

    i just finished a CIP accredited bachelor degree in planning from U of waterloo and have worked in a number of planning intern positions, wondering if you know what the amsterdam program offers.

    thanks in advance

  5. #5
    Member
    Registered
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, British Columbia
    Posts
    1
    Quote Originally posted by rorowan View post
    (I'm reposting this in the correct forum)

    Hi,

    I have just completed my undergrad in Human Geography from UBC (Vancouver, Canada) and want to do a Masters in Planning.

    I have been accepted to the University of Amsterdam's Master of Urban and Regional Planning. This degree is completely in English and is one-year long.

    I was wondering what the reputation of having a masters degree from there would be?
    Also, how would that affect me from getting accreditation with the Canadian Institute of Planners (CIP) or APA?

    I would like to work in the future in Canada, the US or Australia. Would a degree from the Netherlands be looked down upon? I know the Netherlands has a good reputation in actual planning practice but don't know how their degrees would be viewed.

    Also, would this be a bad idea simply in terms of networking and making connections. I am too late to apply to programs in Canada, but should I just try to get some relevant work experience and apply to Canadian universities next year?

    Of course, I am really interested in studying in Europe and especially Amsterdam, but don't want to waste my time and money.
    I'm also a student from UBC currently doing my honours in human geography. Sorry for not being able to answer your question specifically (as I am actually interested in potential job searching in Europe), but I'm also interested in this program as well. I noticed they require 30 ECTS in "planning studies" for admissions if you're not a planning major. Seeing as you're a geography student that got admitted, how did you obtain this qualification? Do urban geog courses count? Thanks.

  6. #6
    Member
    Registered
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    2

    University of Amsterdam

    I know I'm coming to this late, but it's a question I have myself. It looks like it still hasn't been answered!

    rorowan- Did you end up going to UvA? I studied abroad there in 2007 for a semester for Sociology, so I could speak to general questions about studying in Amsterdam. As for housing, most academic programs are very clear about the housing they offer you (usually forcing you to choose theirs even if you can manage something on your own). Amsterdammers complain about how expensive housing is there, but compared to New York (even cheaper parts in Brooklyn) it's not bad at all.

    So no one knows about the merits of UvA's Urban and Regional Planning program? Or the Metropolitan Studies program, for that matter? Any input would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

  7. #7
    Cyburbian njm's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Highlight of the lowland
    Posts
    322
    My answer:

    It depends...

    I have a MS in Sustainable Development from KTH in Stockholm, and in order to legitimize it with most employers in the US (read: not academia) I ended up getting a second Masters in Planning at Rutgers. Now working at a small sustainable planning firm in the NYC area.

    I think people in the private sector look skeptically upon foreign programs because of the notion that studying overseas usually ends up being more like a vacation (which is not necessarily the case) and the fact that the focus is not specifically on policies in the US that you will be dealing with on a daily basis (which is entirely true.)

    I would repeat the experience, without a doubt, but I also was admitted to KTH before they started charging tuition for foreign students so I did not have to go into debt for the degree. If you will need loans, I STRONGLY suggest you spend a considerable amount of time figuring out who your potential employers would be and try to do some informational interviews to gauge response to an international degree before you commit. I can't speak for Canadian/Australian employers, I'd hope they're a little more open but can't promise anything.
    What luck! A random assemblage of words never sounded less intelligent.

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 1
    Last post: 03 Nov 2010, 7:16 PM
  2. Studying in Europe to work in Canada / U.S.
    Career Development and Advice
    Replies: 1
    Last post: 21 Jun 2010, 11:29 AM
  3. Replies: 14
    Last post: 14 Nov 2007, 9:01 AM
  4. Work in Europe - Spain
    Career Development and Advice
    Replies: 1
    Last post: 14 Aug 2006, 6:08 PM