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Thread: The Tapestry Segments that ESRI forgot

  1. #1
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    The Tapestry Segments that ESRI forgot

    Carhartts and Craftsman Tools

    Household Type: Married-couple families.
    Median Age: 43.5.
    Income: Low-medium to medium.
    Employment: Skilled trades.
    Education: High school, some college.
    Residential: Single family, with several pallets of wood pellets in the yard.
    Race/Ethnicity: White. Really, really white.

    Financial: Don't owe nothing to nobody.
    Media: Dish Network, DirecTV
    Vehicle: Ford truck, Chevy truck, Dodge truck, Toyota truck, it ain't don't matter. Disappointed that they couldn't find anything new that still had roll-up windows and an AM radio standard.
    Activities: Locking, loading, recreational powder coating and arc welding, anything with the name of an animal, a weapon and the word "season" in it.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  2. #2
    Cyburbian illinoisplanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Dan View post
    Carhartts and Craftsman Tools
    I think "Sophisticated Squires" are pretty close to this one.

    Quote Originally posted by ESRI
    Sophisticated Squires residents enjoy cultured country living in newer home developments with low density and a median home value of $268,921. These urban escapees are primarily married-couple families, educated, and well employed. They prefer to commute to maintain their semi-rural lifestyle. The median age is 38.3 years. They do their own lawn and landscaping work as well as home improvement and remodeling projects such as installing carpet or hardwood floors and interior painting. They like to barbeque on their gas grills and make bread with their bread-making machines. This is the top market for owning three or more vehicles. Vehicles of choice are minivans and full-sized SUVs. Family activities include playing volleyball, bicycling, playing board games and cards, going to the zoo, and attending soccer and baseball games
    They don't mention hunting or shooting, but I tend to think it fits in very well with the rest of the criteria.
    "Life's a journey, not a destination"
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    Cyburbian Rygor's avatar
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    I don't think many "Carhartt's and Craftsmans" are living in $289,000 homes, unless it's in California where that would qualify as lower end.
    "When life gives you lemons, just say 'No thanks'." - Henry Rollins

  4. #4
    Cyburbian illinoisplanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Rygor View post
    I don't think many "Carhartt's and Craftsmans" are living in $289,000 homes, unless it's in California where that would qualify as lower end.
    You'd be surprised. Craftsman tools, large pickup trucks (and their equally-sized gas tanks), gas grills, guns and ammo, hunting gear, and cold-weather gear all add up. It requires considerable disposable income to afford this lifestyle. Sure, not all these folks are working in white collar jobs to pay for these things, but many of them are making considerable wages with small business ventures.
    "Life's a journey, not a destination"
    -Steven Tyler

  5. #5
    Cyburbian
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    Misleading label, though.

    Sophisticated makes me think of arts and culture, world travel, reading a wide range of books, an appreciation of the finer things in life.

    Squire makes me think of affluent country people, whether a well-to-do Southern family living on the plantation owned by their family since before the Civil War, or people who live the horse country belt on a "farm" and eagery pursue horsey, hunting, fishing and shooting activities, often wearing expensive English outdoor gear like Barbour jackets. There can be a big overlap between "sophisticated" and "squire," in other words, old money Americans.

    The description ESRI attached to sophisticated squire is nothing like what I consider to be the reality. What ESRI describes are comfortably prosperous semi-rural or small town people.

    Quote Originally posted by illinoisplanner View post
    I think "Sophisticated Squires" are pretty close to this one.



    They don't mention hunting or shooting, but I tend to think it fits in very well with the rest of the criteria.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by PennPlanner View post
    Squire makes me think of affluent country people, whether a well-to-do Southern family living on the plantation owned by their family since before the Civil War, or people who live the horse country belt on a "farm" and eagery pursue horsey, hunting, fishing and shooting activities, often wearing expensive English outdoor gear like Barbour jackets. There can be a big overlap between "sophisticated" and "squire," in other words, old money Americans.
    Huh? I think you are romanticizing. Read your history a squire is a step above a serf or wench. Not quite the bottom rung of the fifedom. These were the guys who were basically the slaves of the knights.

    The typical duties of a squire included:

    Carrying the knight's armor, shield, sword, and duty
    Holding any prisoners the knight takes,
    Rescuing the knight should the knight be taken prisoner,
    Ensuring an honorable burial of the knight in the event of his death,
    Replacing the knight's sword if it was broken or dropped,
    Replacing the knight's horse with a new horse or the squire's should the horse be injured or killed,
    Dressing the knight in his armor,
    Carrying the knight's flag,
    Protecting the knight if needed
    Taking care of the knight's horses
    Accompanying their Knight to tournaments and during the time of war to the battlefield
    Ensuring the armor and weapons of the knight were in good order
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  7. #7
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Off-topic:
    actually, I think 'squire' is being used appropriately in the context of 'country squire' or 'esquire' (a more recent title derived from the ancient 'shield-bearer'-type squire Detroitplanner refers to)

  8. #8
    Cyburbian
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    Correct. In England the squirearchy were the minor, untitled gentry who owned small estates of several thousand acres. Think Jane Austen - most of her characters belonged to the squirearchy. Even today the term "squire" is used, whether out of respect or mockingly, as a reference to someone of affluent, established backgrounds.

    In early America, men of Washington's and Jefferson's class - large southern landowners, were sometimes called squires, although the term quickly died out in the post-revolutionary democratic fervor.

    As for Detroit Planner's post - in medieval days one's status was closely tied to the person he served. A great baron or duke was the servant of the king and well into the 1600s the chief "servant" roles of a great household or at court would be occupied by people we would still consider posh. The men who dressed the French kings up to the French revolution of the 1790s were titled men themselves, possessors of great estates. So the person who served the knight, who were also called pages, were still sons of landowners who occupied this role as a form of training for his own status as a knight.



    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    Off-topic:
    actually, I think 'squire' is being used appropriately in the context of 'country squire' or 'esquire' (a more recent title derived from the ancient 'shield-bearer'-type squire Detroitplanner refers to)

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Linda_D's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Dan View post
    Carhartts and Craftsman Tools

    Household Type: Married-couple families.
    Median Age: 43.5.
    Income: Low-medium to medium.
    Employment: Skilled trades.
    Education: High school, some college.
    Residential: Single family, with several pallets of wood pellets in the yard.
    Race/Ethnicity: White. Really, really white.

    Financial: Don't owe nothing to nobody.
    Media: Dish Network, DirecTV
    Vehicle: Ford truck, Chevy truck, Dodge truck, Toyota truck, it ain't don't matter. Disappointed that they couldn't find anything new that still had roll-up windows and an AM radio standard.
    Activities: Locking, loading, recreational powder coating and arc welding, anything with the name of an animal, a weapon and the word "season" in it.
    Quote Originally posted by illinoisplanner View post
    You'd be surprised. Craftsman tools, large pickup trucks (and their equally-sized gas tanks), gas grills, guns and ammo, hunting gear, and cold-weather gear all add up. It requires considerable disposable income to afford this lifestyle. Sure, not all these folks are working in white collar jobs to pay for these things, but many of them are making considerable wages with small business ventures.
    Actually, depending upon the age of your vehicles, tools, and weapons, it doesn't necessarily require all that much income to live this life-style at all, especially considering that your new house rolled onto your lot either on a flatbed or its own wheels and was ready to move into within days of the old one being hauled away -- for about a quarter of the median-priced $289,000 "sophisticated squires'" home.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian Rygor's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Linda_D View post
    Actually, depending upon the age of your vehicles, tools, and weapons, it doesn't necessarily require all that much income to live this life-style at all, especially considering that your new house rolled onto your lot either on a flatbed or its own wheels and was ready to move into within days of the old one being hauled away -- for about a quarter of the median-priced $289,000 "sophisticated squires'" home.
    Oh yeah. There are plenty of "Carhartt's and Craftsman Tools" living on the outskirts of my fine community in glorified mobile homes on large lots or beat-up old farmhouses with 6-8 rusty old cars sitting in the backyard.
    "When life gives you lemons, just say 'No thanks'." - Henry Rollins

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