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Thread: Master planning for resilient cities

  1. #1
    Cyburbian
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    Master planning for resilient cities

    In light of recent disasters in various cities around the world, I thought I'd raise the topic for a general discussion.

    - How should disaster resilience be integrated into the development of comprehensive masterplans? As a separate element of the comp plan? As a theme throughout comp plan elements? As a core objective of land-use planning (integrated into core zoning)? Part of your climate adaptation framework if you have one? Not in the plan at all, but you took FEMA's money to prep a separate multi-hazard risk assessment report that is in no way integrated with your comp plan? No plan at all?

    - How does your city or agency do it?

    - What disaster types do you consider?

    - What type of assessment and analysis should planners do?

    - Where do you get your data from?

    - How do you know if existing, future and zoned land-use responds to disaster risks such as flood plains, storm surge limits, earthquake fault lines, etc, etc?

    - What changes in the process are necessary?

  2. #2
    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Cismontane View post
    In light of recent disasters in various cities around the world, I thought I'd raise the topic for a general discussion.

    - How should disaster resilience be integrated into the development of comprehensive masterplans? As a separate element of the comp plan? As a theme throughout comp plan elements? As a core objective of land-use planning (integrated into core zoning)? Part of your climate adaptation framework if you have one? Not in the plan at all, but you took FEMA's money to prep a separate multi-hazard risk assessment report that is in no way integrated with your comp plan? No plan at all?

    - How does your city or agency do it?

    - What disaster types do you consider?

    - What type of assessment and analysis should planners do?

    - Where do you get your data from?

    - How do you know if existing, future and zoned land-use responds to disaster risks such as flood plains, storm surge limits, earthquake fault lines, etc, etc?

    - What changes in the process are necessary?
    I was just at the Resilience 2011 conference. The folks there would tell you that these answers emerge from local knowledge, depend on scale, and must be both flexible and reflect justice and the political economy before they even start to integrate their plans with other resilience...um..."plans".

    Resilience = flexible. Sustainable = static.

    But to the point: I doubt hardly any jurisdictions or a department is within a light-year of being resilient. I'd like to hear the stories of those who are trying to close the gap.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by ColoGI View post
    I doubt hardly any jurisdictions or a department is within a light-year of being resilient. I'd like to hear the stories of those who are trying to close the gap.
    From my own conversations with muni governments, land-use is a special problem. Nobody wants to touch zoning or land-use regulation to avoid or minimize disaster risks. This is the case even on first-line intercoastal channel towns in Long Island, the Carolinas and the Florida Gold Coast.

    I'd be interested in hearing about cases where towns and cities have actually looked at zoning from a disaster resilience perspective.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Cismontane View post
    From my own conversations with muni governments, land-use is a special problem. Nobody wants to touch zoning or land-use regulation to avoid or minimize disaster risks...I'd be interested in hearing about cases where towns and cities have actually looked at zoning from a disaster resilience perspective.
    Any city with old-school highly engineered infrastructure that separates water functions into dichotomous uses, or relies on fossil fuels, or has a majority of its land uses in single-use functions is almost by definition not resilient. To correct this dysfunction is beyond our capacity at this time and any time in the near- or medium-term. To begin to take baby steps away from this condition would be excellent, and I'd like to hear how places are framing it, if indeed anyone is brave enough.

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