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Thread: Traditional scale redevelopment

  1. #1
    Member
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    Traditional scale redevelopment

    Many urban renewal projects involved the consolidation of small lots followed by development at a larger scale than previously existed on site. I am looking for examples of successful redevelopment of former urban renewal areas (or other areas with large parcels) at a finer-grained scale that would be conducive to traditional retail and small-scale mixed-use development -- as opposed to the urban version of lifestyle centers dominated by national chains. Do you know of cases where communities have recovered some of the character lost in earlier urban renewal efforts?

  2. #2
    Cyburbian
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    Nov 2010
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    Toronto
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    The best example i know of in my neck-of-the-woods is "The Beaches" development in Toronto.

    http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=...,96.21,,0,4.62

    The area bounded by Queesn Street, larkeshore Road and Northern Dancer Blvd. (plus the large par area west of Northern Dancer) was formerly the Woodbine Horse Racing Track. It was redeveloped in the 1990's.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

    I love to hear this. The typical approach is to close up the locally-owned "mom and pop" shops, redevelop several unique individual properties into one large building, and then tenant it with national chains and franchises. The reason for this is that we tend to believe we need to attract that large outside developer, and we don't appreciate the aesthetic value or economic value of multiple properties with separate ownership and multiple local businesses.

    In undertaking this approach you are no doubt creating more work for yourself. At the same time, I can see where you will find much more community and property owner acceptance. I think you would want to match renovation and redevelopment assistance to existing property owners with a program to buy and resell other properties. You are likely to find more local interest including some from growing businesses in the area - you might even target local businesses in your marketing. You will find less interest from large developers. You will need to have some more stringent design guidelines in place (maybe with maximum building footprint?), and also spend more time negotiating development agreements. It will also be a multi-year effort rather than a one-time deal.

    As for examples of small-scall infill or redevelopment, there are countless examples in communities across the country. I have dozens of photos in my collection. They are individual properties, though, and not redevelopment of large areas.

    Lastly, please don't get snowed by the approach of designing one large building with multiple facades to look like several buildings. It is fake and people can tell it is fake.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  4. #4
    Cyburbian mike gurnee's avatar
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    Feb 1998
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    Greensburg, Kansas
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    Quote Originally posted by Cardinal View post
    Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

    I love to hear this. The typical approach is to close up the locally-owned "mom and pop" shops, redevelop several unique individual properties into one large building, and then tenant it with national chains and franchises. The reason for this is that we tend to believe we need to attract that large outside developer, and we don't appreciate the aesthetic value or economic value of multiple properties with separate ownership and multiple local businesses.

    In undertaking this approach you are no doubt creating more work for yourself. At the same time, I can see where you will find much more community and property owner acceptance. I think you would want to match renovation and redevelopment assistance to existing property owners with a program to buy and resell other properties. You are likely to find more local interest including some from growing businesses in the area - you might even target local businesses in your marketing. You will find less interest from large developers. You will need to have some more stringent design guidelines in place (maybe with maximum building footprint?), and also spend more time negotiating development agreements. It will also be a multi-year effort rather than a one-time deal.

    As for examples of small-scall infill or redevelopment, there are countless examples in communities across the country. I have dozens of photos in my collection. They are individual properties, though, and not redevelopment of large areas.

    Lastly, please don't get snowed by the approach of designing one large building with multiple facades to look like several buildings. It is fake and people can tell it is fake.
    ...and all the renderings look the same

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