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Poll results: Would you move into a new home within 1,000 feet of a cell tower?

Voters
31. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, nothing to worry about

    13 41.94%
  • Maybe, I might have to think twice

    7 22.58%
  • No, Not that close or within eyesight

    2 6.45%
  • Why do you hate America?

    9 29.03%
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Thread: Would you live near a cell tower?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Tide's avatar
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    Would you live near a cell tower?

    To make a really long story short the Tide family may have the opportunity to put an offer down on a new home in NC here in the coming week or two. The builder is VERY motivated, came off the price $20k just this month and over $50k from the original listing plus are willing to throw in many upgrades we requested. Another perk is the nature preserve in the back of all the properties, a 14 acre wooded piece that will never be developed (deed restricted). It would be a great opportunity to restart the homeownership phase of our lives after having to sell and move for the job I have now, we don't want to rent for 2 or 3 more years. The neighborhood is nice with many families with similarly aged children and in the best elementary school district in the county so there are many many things going right for this house, however, just outside the subdivision (100 units) is a cell tower with about 4 carriers on it, as my wife said when she saw it for the first time, "what's that monstrosity".

    To my fellow cyburbians, some of whom are in the industry, would you buy a great home even if it was within about 2 or 3 football fields (b/t 500-1000 feet) away and clearly visable out the front door of your home? Any evidence to back up your claims yes or no would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian jsk1983's avatar
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    I live in Chicago and cell phone transmitters or whatever they are called are just located atop taller buildings. Don't even notice them. Can you see it from your house? If its out of sight it wouldn't bother me.

    Is the nature preserve wetlands? And even if not what's the mosquito situation? My grandparents live in a semi-rural suburb outside of Buffalo and are surrounded by fields and forests and in the summer I really can't stand to be in the yard due to the mosquito situation.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Veloise's avatar
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    Bet you can add some landscaping to block it.

    ETA: examples.

    http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4051/...796fdc3c7c.jpg

  4. #4
    Cyburbian WSU MUP Student's avatar
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    Will the tower be visible while you are enjoying the comfort of your backyard? How about when you are standing on the street facing your house? Personally, as long as it were not right across the street from me, directly behind me, or adjacent to my yard, I don't think I would mind all that much - of course that's easy for me to say not having been faced with the actual decision.
    "Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost." - 1980 Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan

  5. #5
    Cyburbian Planit's avatar
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    Well the reception would be great!

    We have one about 1500' from us. I can see it driving down our street, but to be honest it has 'disappeared' into the landscape. Just like the group home 5 houses away, it's just part of the neighborhood fabric.

    If you do the old stand-by pros vs. cons list, where does it stack up?
    "Whatever beer I'm drinking, is better than the one I'm not." DMLW
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  6. #6
    OH....IO Hink's avatar
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    No.

    As the utilities become more powerful here in our State, I don't trust that they won't be given some power to build higher or more densely.
    A common mistake people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools. -Douglas Adams

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Veloise's avatar
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    Couple more ideas

    If this house is under serious consideration...

    --how many carriers are on it, and which ones? (Count the antenna platforms, and check the company names on the utility meter(s) visible at the equipment shelter.)

    In another thread we were discussing one of the telecom industry's latest news items: microcells sprinkled everywhere. It reads as though this is not a city street with 3-story buildings or lots of utility poles. Is the tower near a highway?

    Compare with a neighbor's teenager and a garage band.

    No offense is intended nor implied to anyone ages 13-19

  8. #8
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    My best friend's parents own a similarly sited house in Oregon but it is an electricity transmission tower corridor behind their property. They've lived there 20 years without issue and my friend's father enjoys not having neighbors on the backside of the property for 1,000 feet.
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Tide's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Veloise View post
    --how many carriers are on it, and which ones? (Count the antenna platforms, and check the company names on the utility meter(s) visible at the equipment shelter.)
    What does the amount of antennae (I said there was about 4 individual levels) can't readily get to the equipment shed but why does that matter? Maybe you could explain that more.

  10. #10
    I assume that if I have service, Im near a tower. Though with ATT, one never really knows.

  11. #11
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Already have one in the park adjacent to my home. I think that they purposely located it as close as possible to the neighborhood over-reaction to everything lady.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

  12. #12
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    At the distance you describe it would not be a problem.

    They are actually very innocuous structures in general, except if you have an overwrought sense of aesthetics. I wouldn't mind it at all, but due to reality I would consider the impact it would have on your house's resale ability. Unless you intend to live there the rest of your life you would to your self a diservice not to consider the resale impact.

    Actually, I would even allow it on my property and get income from it.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

    Six seasons and a movie!

  13. #13
    Cyburbian Bubba's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by kjelsadek View post
    My best friend's parents own a similarly sited house in Oregon but it is an electricity transmission tower corridor behind their property.
    There's one of those 250 feet in front of my house (corridor behind the houses across the street) - no issues at all.
    I found you a new motto from a sign hanging on their wall…"Drink coffee: do stupid things faster and with more energy"

  14. #14
    Cyburbian imaplanner's avatar
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    At that distance I wouldn't think twice. The fcc and the EPA claim them to be extremely safe- not that I put much trust in the government to give us the truth regarding big business, BUT at the distance you describe I wouldn't worry about it at all.

    And on the bright side- you should have EXCELLENT cell phone reception.


    http://transition.fcc.gov/oet/rfsafety/rf-faqs.html

    Cellular radio services transmit using frequencies between 824 and 894 megahertz (MHz). Transmitters in the Personal Communications Service (PCS) use frequencies in the range of 1850-1990 MHz. Antennas used for cellular and PCS transmissions are typically located on towers, water tanks or other elevated structures including rooftops and the sides of buildings. The combination of antennas and associated electronic equipment is referred to as a cellular or PCS "base station" or "cell site." Typical heights for free-standing base station towers or structures are 50-200 feet. A cellular base station may utilize several "omni-directional" antennas that look like poles, 10 to 15 feet in length, although these types of antennas are less common in urbanized areas.

    In urban and suburban areas, cellular and PCS service providers commonly use "sector" antennas for their base stations. These antennas are rectangular panels, e.g., about 1 by 4 feet in size, typically mounted on a rooftop or other structure, but they are also mounted on towers or poles. Panel antennas are usually arranged in three groups of three each. It is common that not all antennas are used for the transmission of RF energy; some antennas may be receive-only.

    At a given cell site, the total RF power that could be radiated by the antennas depends on the number of radio channels (transmitters) installed, the power of each transmitter, and the type of antenna. While it is theoretically possible for cell sites to radiate at very high power levels, the maximum power radiated in any direction usually does not exceed 50 watts.

    The RF emissions from cellular or PCS base station antennas are generally directed toward the horizon in a relatively narrow pattern in the vertical plane. In the case of sector (panel) antennas, the pattern is fan-shaped, like a wedge cut from a pie. As with all forms of electromagnetic energy, the power density from the antenna decreases rapidly as one moves away from the antenna. Consequently, ground-level exposures are much less than exposures if one were at the same height and directly in front of the antenna.

    Measurements made near typical cellular and PCS installations, especially those with tower-mounted antennas, have shown that ground-level power densities are thousands of times less than the FCC's limits for safe exposure. This makes it extremely unlikely that a member of the general public could be exposed to RF levels in excess of FCC guidelines due solely to cellular or PCS base station antennas located on towers or monopoles.

    When cellular and PCS antennas are mounted at rooftop locations it is possible that a person could encounter RF levels greater than those typically encountered on the ground. However, once again, exposures approaching or exceeding the safety guidelines are only likely to be encountered very close to and directly in front of the antennas. For sector-type antennas, RF levels to rear are usually very low. (Back to Index)
    Children in the back seat can cause accidents - and vice versa.

  15. #15
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Sure......

    But only if I was getting paid for the lease on the tower.....maybe about $2,000 a month minimum.......
    Skilled Adoxographer

  16. #16
    Cyburbian Linda_D's avatar
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    I would think twice about buying a house near a cell tower, but more because of the aesthetics than about safety concerns.

  17. #17
    Cyburbian Tide's avatar
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    I will rephrase that the aesthetics impacts are pretty low, out the back of the house you can't see it only if you look down the street out of the front door. It is the terminus view for the one end of the street but there is wooded areas between it and the homes. What concerns us is the "perceived" safety risks not immediate but 40 years down the road from 20-30 years of exposure? I realize folks work and live in high rises with cell antennae right over their head but have the effects been measured over a long enough period? Cell technology is only about 20-25 years old in widespread use.

  18. #18
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Tide View post
    I will rephrase that the aesthetics impacts are pretty low, out the back of the house you can't see it only if you look down the street out of the front door. It is the terminus view for the one end of the street but there is wooded areas between it and the homes. What concerns us is the "perceived" safety risks not immediate but 40 years down the road from 20-30 years of exposure? I realize folks work and live in high rises with cell antennae right over their head but have the effects been measured over a long enough period? Cell technology is only about 20-25 years old in widespread use.
    It's not going to kill you any faster or slower than anything else in the environment including what's inside your house.
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  19. #19
    Cyburbian Linda_D's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by kjelsadek View post
    It's not going to kill you any faster or slower than anything else in the environment including what's inside your house.
    I would agree with this. I'd worry more if I was one of those people with a cell phone attached to my ear 24/7 than if I lived 500-1000 feet from a cell tower.

  20. #20
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by kjelsadek View post
    It's not going to kill you any faster or slower than anything else in the environment including what's inside your house.
    Agreed. How would you isolate the effects from the tower over that period from everything else in one's life - like foods, auto emissions, smoking, etc.

    Plus, in 20 years, that tower will surely be outmoded tech and become recycled steel.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

    Six seasons and a movie!

  21. #21
    Cyburbian imaplanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by kjelsadek View post
    It's not going to kill you any faster or slower than anything else in the environment including what's inside your house.
    Plus- radiation can kill some other nasties that you might be experiencing. It could cancel out some other environmental illnesses and you could be super-healthy and indestructable.
    Children in the back seat can cause accidents - and vice versa.

  22. #22
    Cyburbian boiker's avatar
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    There's non-ionizing radiation and ionizing radiation.

    X-rays are ionizing that is why you can only take small exposures.

    Non-ionizing radiation (TV, cellular, microwaves, AM/FM radio) is thought to be essentially harmless below the levels that cause heating. In other words, if you open your microwave and expose yourself to 1,100 watts you'll cook yourself before you cause ionization of your cellular structure. Cell towers are often in the 3 to 50 watt range. AM radio transmits from many kilowatt towers. WGN-AM proudly proclaimed 50,000 watt of power. No issues are raised when radio towers are located near homes.

    You'll get more ionizing radiation on a jet flight (stellar-sourced ultraviolet, gamma, xray) than you will living 100 feet to 1,500 feet from a cell tower (no ionizing radiation from a cell tower).
    Dude, I'm cheesing so hard right now.

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