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Thread: Methods for billboard regulation?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian
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    Methods for billboard regulation?

    One of the projects I will need to undertake while doing my internship is cataloging all billboards within our town limits.

    I am looking for a way to get exact indisputable measurements of the board, so if we deem it to be non-conforming, there won't be any questions about it from the owner.

    How do you measure billboard sizes in your town? Do you have any regulations in place as far as LED or Moving billboards go?

    Thanks for any help!

  2. #2
    Cyburbian ursus's avatar
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    I'm going to take a stab and hope I'm understanding your question right. We measure what would be the equivalent of the "cabinet" of any freestanding sign. Height is measured to the top of the cabinet. (one side only, LEDs the same.)

    Are you going to be recording their measurements for a database, taking them from the permit files? They should be dimensioned on the building permits, so once you've got a list of locations you can pull the files and transfer the dimensions that are already there, right?

    I might be missing something, but that's what I'd do.
    "...I would never try to tick Hink off. He kinda intimidates me. He's quite butch, you know." - Maister

  3. #3
    Cyburbian
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    They will be put into a GIS document where we can show them via an HTML popup, with pictures etc.

    Im not quite sure the reason that I need to actually measure the size in the field though, but thats what I was told. We limit the signs to I believe 200 sq ft, and for whatever reason, I will need to measure and verify that these fit.

  4. #4
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by AG74683 View post
    I am looking for a way to get exact indisputable measurements of the board, so if we deem it to be non-conforming, there won't be any questions about it from the owner.
    Billboards are banned here and in most surrounding communities, fortunately.

    The majority of billboards in the US come in three standard sizes:
    • 8-sheet or junior: 60' / 5'x11' display area, excluding the frame. Usually seen only in urban areas.
    • 20-sheet: 288' / 12'x24' display area or 300' /12'x25', excluding the frame. Often vinyl display surfaces will be wrapped around the frame to 420' / 15'x28'
    • Bulletin: 672' / 14'x48' display area, with no frame. Cutouts and extensions will often push the actual size beyond 672'.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  5. #5
    Cyburbian Streck's avatar
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    I would suggest using a telescoping measuring pole for the height.

    I found this telescoping 25 ft product on the net:

    http://cableorganizer.com/jameson/te...ring-pole.html

    And of course the width can be measured on the ground (by looking up at each end).

  6. #6
    Cyburbian
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    turns out a good portion of our billboards don't actually follow standard sizes, hence the reason to have to hand measure. I can count like 4 out of the 20 we have that look standard. Most seem to be left overs from some other purpose.

    Looks like we are going to use a combination of the telescoping pole and a laser range finder, which we already happened to have.

    thanks for the advice guys!

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