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Thread: One page resumes

  1. #1
    Cyburbian
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    One page resumes

    When I graduated college in the mid 90s, the advice from Career Services was to keep your resumes a single page in length. As you gained experience then, of course, your resume could grow. 10 years after grad school, I wonder if its still smart to keep it a page in length. I have more experience certainly, but as I've advanced in my career, the length of someone's resume hasn't been a determining factor in any hiring decisions I've made. I recently revamped my resume, which was just two pages anyway, and condensed it down to a single page, not counting references.

    Do you think its wise to limit yourself to a page and elaborate in your cover letter and interview? I know I find myself falling into the "tl;dr" (too long; didn't read) habit and someone with a single-page, lean resume that leaves me wanting more seems more appealing to me than one with a little too much fluff.

    Thoughts?

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Tarf's avatar
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    I think we just did this thread recently.

    About 60-75% say multiple pages is fine, and that the one-page rule is outdated and/or applies only to entry level.

    The remainder stick by the old rule of thumb that it should be less than one page, regardless; anything more is pretentious.

    I'm in the 60-75% group, assuming that you actually can't fit everything on a single page (i.e., assuming you're not just padding the resume with superfluous information).
    In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move. (Douglas Adams)

  3. #3
    Cyburbian
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    You're right. I should have looked more closely at the "when to remove your internships" thread. Looks like technology and changing work patterns make 2-3 page resumes more acceptable than maybe they used to be. Sorry for the duplication!

  4. #4
    It really depends on the employer. A multiple page resume, similar to a CV, would be appropriate for a federal or state agency. 1 to 2 pages would be appropriate for private consulting. I'm not sure about local governments, but come to think of it, most governments use online job applications. I question how relevant a resume would be since HR and the hiring official will just be looking at the application package. A well done resume would be icing on the cake during the interview process, but it probably won't be a deciding factor either way. Just my two cents

  5. #5
    Cyburbian ThePinkPlanner's avatar
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    I think the organization of a resume is more important than the length. I'd take 2-3 pages of carefully organized, easy to follow, easy to read resume over one page of size 10 font squished into run on sentences so as to avoid the space that line breaks or paragraphing takes up.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Tide's avatar
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    If you aren't just getting out of college it should be almost impossible to put your education and experience on one page.
    I personally would be very worried about someone with ten years of experience who trimmed down all they did to one page, it would take a long time and a lot of creative word usage to fully explain job responsibilities and skills.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian
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    There are ways to cram more info into two pages. Size 11 or 11.5 font, preferably a typeface that is slightly "narrower." Leave at least .25" bleed, move headers into the margins. I sometimes reduce the margins to 0.9" Personally I prefer bullets over sentences and I never use paragraphs in a resume (just a personal choice). If you use bullets you also have a little more flexibility using sentence fragments. Prepositional phrases can be reworded into other sentences. Try minimizing lines of text that just have a few words. If a bullet point goes onto a new line, see what you can take out or reword to save one line of text.

    Example: zoning ordinance project
    • designed three conceptual site plans for a typical residential street (8,200 SF lots, 10,000 SF lots, and 12, 000 SF lots).
    • included photographs of built projects at similar densities found in Visualizing Density, published by the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.
    • AutoCAD designs combined with real examples convinced the Village appointed officials to approve a lower residential density in the zoning ordinance.

    Reworded:
    • designed 3 residential street plans (8,200 SF lots, 10,000 SF lots, and 12, 000 SF lots).
    • included built project photos at similar densities found in Visualizing Density, published by the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.
    • CAD designs along with built examples convinced Village to approve a lower residential density in the zoning ordinance.
    "This is great, honey. What's the crunchy stuff?"
    "M&Ms. I ran out of paprika."

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  8. #8
    Cyburbian boiker's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by nrschmid View post
    There are ways to cram more info into two pages. Size 11 or 11.5 font, preferably a typeface that is slightly "narrower." Leave at least .25" bleed, move headers into the margins. I sometimes reduce the margins to 0.9" Personally I prefer bullets over sentences and I never use paragraphs in a resume (just a personal choice). If you use bullets you also have a little more flexibility using sentence fragments. Prepositional phrases can be reworded into other sentences. Try minimizing lines of text that just have a few words. If a bullet point goes onto a new line, see what you can take out or reword to save one line of text.

    Example: zoning ordinance project
    designed three conceptual site plans for a typical residential street (8,200 SF lots, 10,000 SF lots, and 12, 000 SF lots).
    included photographs of built projects at similar densities found in Visualizing Density, published by the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.
    AutoCAD designs combined with real examples convinced the Village appointed officials to approve a lower residential density in the zoning ordinance.

    Reworded:
    designed 3 residential street plans (8,200 SF lots, 10,000 SF lots, and 12, 000 SF lots).
    included built project photos at similar densities found in Visualizing Density, published by the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.
    CAD designs along with built examples convinced Village to approve a lower residential density in the zoning ordinance.
    I always over summarize:

    - fully designed, and marketed a mixed lot size residential project gaining Village approval.
    Dude, I'm cheesing so hard right now.

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