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Thread: Upgrade or new career?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian
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    Upgrade or new career?

    I have a 2yr degree at college, I am thinking of finishing two more years and getting my BA, but I am wondering if that would make alot of diffrence, considering the cost. My friend just graduated from a 2yr buisness course and less than 6 months he allready has a job, maybe I should take buisness? I also taught myself photoshop, so thinking of taking graphic design.

    Considering the lack of jobs and compition in planning, especially for entry level, is it worth upgrading, or would my money be better spent taking a diffrent career field, healthcare is open, but im not sure if I would be cut out for that.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian
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    A 2 year "degree" is not a degree. However, there are "some" positions that require just a few years of school. When I moved to Kansas from Illinois for my last job, I was shocked that the engineering firm hired draftsmen which just associates. In Illinois the very least is a 4 year non-engineering degree.

    You will NOT earn a job in planning or many fields with just 2 years of classes. Stay in school and finish your FOUR YEAR degree.
    "This is great, honey. What's the crunchy stuff?"
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  3. #3
    Cyburbian chupacabra's avatar
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    Pretty much everywhere I've been recognizes a two year associate's degree as a legitimate academic qualification. Canada also has some really interesting two-year programs that I haven't seen in the US. Just last week I was at the Mike Lin workshop with a group of Canadians who were in a two-year landscape architecture technology degree program. In the past I worked with some Canadians with two year degrees in what I describe as "scientific fieldwork". They were well employed and made good money. However, they spent a lot of time overseas, in oil fields, etc.

    I've known plenty of people who have worked in A/E/C and resource development with two year degrees (draftsmen, surveyors, tech people). They are able to get their foot in the door but their upward mobility is limited.

    For planning, an associates isn't of much use. Get a 4-year degree. I would find something different that might complement your planning education and experience: business, geomatics, landscape architecture.
    You can grow ideas in the garden of your mind.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    A two-year degree has become the new high school diploma. You can be a technician, but you will not rise higher without a good deal of luck.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  5. #5
    OH....IO Hink's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by buckie33 View post
    Considering the lack of jobs and compition in planning, especially for entry level, is it worth upgrading, or would my money be better spent taking a diffrent career field, healthcare is open, but im not sure if I would be cut out for that.
    If you don't like healthcare I wouldn't go into it, but Nursing and PA's are in demand and make a lot of money.

    Even with the changes in federal and state law, people will still need a medical team... unlike the planning field.

    If you want to stay in planning, you will need to finish the 4 yr undergrad and consider additional education to round out your skill set. Good luck.
    A common mistake people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools. -Douglas Adams

  6. #6
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    College bound Canadians take an extra year of High School as I understand it. There is more of a distinction between colleges and univesities at least in Ontario, with a college narrowly defined as a 2 year program. F our year colleges are virtually unheard of in Ontario. The programs however lend themselves well to going on to Universities to finish-up the 4 year degree, with less need to re-up credits (most of the classes I took at Community College here in the States did not transfer to the 4 year degree).

    The question you need to ask yourself is what is it that you want to do? Do you want to make money or do you want to do something that makes you happy? If you took a planning cirriculum to make money, you're not going to be happy.
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  7. #7
    For the love of God, don't go into planning while you still have nothing really invested. If you're concerned about the cost of a 4-year education, by all means go the health care route. There are many medical careers you can go into with an associate-level education, for instance: sonography, nursing, dental hygiene, radiology, etc. Many of these still need two years of pre-reqs before you do the actual program, but at least you'd have marketable skills, as opposed to all of the out of work planners with graduate degrees trying to get gainfully employed.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally posted by buckie33 View post
    I have a 2yr degree at college, I am thinking of finishing two more years and getting my BA, but I am wondering if that would make alot of diffrence, considering the cost. My friend just graduated from a 2yr buisness course and less than 6 months he allready has a job, maybe I should take buisness? I also taught myself photoshop, so thinking of taking graphic design.

    Considering the lack of jobs and compition in planning, especially for entry level, is it worth upgrading, or would my money be better spent taking a diffrent career field, healthcare is open, but im not sure if I would be cut out for that.
    Fanshawe College?

  9. #9
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by xvodax View post
    Fanshawe College?
    Yeah, I went to Fanshawe, looks like the B,A that they offer is the 2 years I have done allready plus 2 more years that I have yet to take, so I have done half of the work allready. At the end of the day, yes money matters, but I really just want to get a job, a full time job anywhere, im 25 and sick and fustrated that im still at home.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian cng's avatar
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    Do what you like. But, health care is a safe bet. Don't go into anything that could be outsourced. More and more radiology work is being outsourced, since digital images can easily be analyzed elsewhere. Nurses have high earning potential because they tend to work a lot of overtime, but they still routinely have to do things that are gross and underappreciated. Be a doctor, if you have the time, intelligence and the diligence. As a doctor, my sister earns twice as much as me, working half the hours as me (she is also a stay-at-home mom). And if you want to stay out of debt for medical school, be a military doc - they will pay for your tuition.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally posted by buckie33 View post
    Yeah, I went to Fanshawe, looks like the B,A that they offer is the 2 years I have done allready plus 2 more years that I have yet to take, so I have done half of the work allready. At the end of the day, yes money matters, but I really just want to get a job, a full time job anywhere, im 25 and sick and fustrated that im still at home.
    well.. i'm going into my final year of ILP. i also bridged from GIS and Urban.

    i'd suggest you take a big thought to what you wanna do, cause if you come into ILP. its more a landscape architecture program. there is a real lack of planning involved..

    keep searching for jobs tho, i know there out there.. even if you went through only gis and urban.

    cheers
    xv

  12. #12
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by cng View post
    Do what you like. But, health care is a safe bet. Don't go into anything that could be outsourced. More and more radiology work is being outsourced, since digital images can easily be analyzed elsewhere. Nurses have high earning potential because they tend to work a lot of overtime, but they still routinely have to do things that are gross and underappreciated. Be a doctor, if you have the time, intelligence and the diligence. As a doctor, my sister earns twice as much as me, working half the hours as me (she is also a stay-at-home mom). And if you want to stay out of debt for medical school, be a military doc - they will pay for your tuition.
    Most RNs shift the gross parts of their job to LVNs and especially nurse aides. It is still a good profession that will not be going away and is likely to continue growth.

    You can also consider getting a Physician Assistant or Nurse Practitioner degree--gets you away from a lot of the 'gross' aspects of direct healthcare provision, better pay, less liability (compared to doctor), don't have to deal with the business-end of a practice so much, and less education (essentially a masters degree).

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

  13. #13
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by xvodax View post
    Fanshawe College?
    My money is on St. Clair College.
    Whoops.

    Would it too difficult to get a degree in geography or a related field from Western?
    Last edited by DetroitPlanner; 22 Aug 2011 at 1:07 PM. Reason: should have read the next reponse!
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner View post
    My money is on St. Clair College.
    Whoops.

    Would it too difficult to get a degree in geography or a related field from Western?
    I've considered this, the urban development program at western would be very good for any one looking to mix land, money and development together and i've done some research, grads of this program are doing pretty well.

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