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Thread: Private sector recovery after a disaster

  1. #1
    Member
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    Private sector recovery after a disaster

    I am working on a strategy for private sector recovery after a disaster. I'm looking for case studies on how cities helped businesses recover (i.e. permitting, communications, relocation, etc) after a disaster, such as an earthquake or flood. I've already got APA's 'Planning for Post-Disaster Recovery and Reconstruction' but I'm looking for something more oriented towards economic recovery.

    In addition, can anyone suggest strategies for encouraging businesses to develop individual disaster recovery plans/attend trainings?

    FYI, this is for a small to medium sized city in California.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Cyburbian mike gurnee's avatar
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    Work with the insurance industry for ideas. They can even help with getting the word out when you show them premiums will rise as merchants get a grip on true costs and the need for better coverage.

    The main issue in Greensburg is that storefronts rented for $3-400 a month before the storm. Rents in new construction is quite a bit more. What we have to work on is to show that with sustainable building, utility cost savings can cover most of the rent increase.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Mike hit on a great problem for many businesses. They cannot afford to rent new construction. Does this mean that the city may have to help subsidize space? There are many other costs, too, that the business must bear to re-esyablish itself. You are right to focus on pre-disaster planning. In addition to APA, you should speak with the great folks over at the International Economic Development Council. I worked with them in Mississippi after Katrina and they have now formed a task force on disaster recovery from an economic development point of view. Send me a PM and I can hook you up.

    The other big problem that immediately comes to mind is that many companies impacted by a disaster lose customers and employees they need to recover. For a retail or service business this may mean trade area residents who are displaced. For a manufacturer it may be customers that it can't supply while waiting for new space or machinery to resume production.
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  4. #4
    NIMBY asshatterer Plus Richmond Jake's avatar
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    I'm not familiar with private sector post-recovery planning, but the Florida Dept of Community Affairs is actively involved in this issue. Here's a link that might be of assistance.

    http://www.dca.state.fl.us/fdcp/DCP/PDRP/index.cfm

  5. #5
    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    Reopening an old thread

    In the wake of Hurricane Irene and the damage caused to many inland communities in upstate New York and Vermont, I am looking for information on what planners and economic development professionals can do to assist in the recovery and revitalization process. I am especially interested in case studies of rural communities, as they often don't have the resources or capacity like you might find in a city.

    I have visited RestoreYourEconomy.org, a website developed by the U.S. Economic Development Administration with the IEDC. It's a great site, but I'm looking for more specific examples and best practices that pertain to rural areas. These businesses operate on a shoestring to begin with... Will they be able to recover after such a devastating event?

    Thanks.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Timely. I am working on one of these recovery plans right now. As for the ones I did after Katrina I would say the resuls have been mixed. They will recover eventually because they have the desirable location. It has simply taken long because of the extent of the damage. Here I am not so sure. The largest community in the area has some serious issues to deal with, but has the economy to pull through. The smaller communities have been losing population and economic strength for decades. Will it make sense for people to return, or will they take their payments and move on to a larger place with more opportunities?
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