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Thread: Post-Interview experience: Is this unprofessional?

  1. #1
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    Post-Interview experience: Is this unprofessional?

    Hello,
    I recently interviewed with a planning firm that I've heard has a good reputation. They ended up offering me the job. It would require me to relocate to a new city. However, this is where it all gets a little questionable:

    1. The person who offered me the job, called me to discuss salary negotiations while they were driving in their car (so entire phone call was hard to make out and cut out several times and the person could not answer all my questions).

    2. They were suppose to get back to me the other day about my salary expectations and what they're willing to offer me. They never called the day they said they would - making me wait by my phone the entire night - and only emailed me the next day to explain why. Then wanted to reschedule. Which is fine, however...if I were do that I would look like the unprofessional person and they'd probably think twice.

    3. Still have not received a more detailed description of the job and what it will all entail.

    4. Have not received a possible start date...which I would assume they would have in mind but they seem to be dragging this hiring process out a lot longer than I think necessary.

    My question to you all...is this unprofessional behaviour? Even though my salary would probably increase and there's potential to do more of the work I'd like to be doing, do you think I should still take the job? I'm worried that this is an example of what's to come which is something I don't really want to me apart of.

    Thoughts, comments, queries!

  2. #2
    Cyburbian
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    Personally I don't consider an offer an offer until I have something in writing, stating the salary, job description, start date, benefits, etc. I think at the very least you should ask for this. If they are hesitating to do this after they offered you the job , I don't think it's really work.
    "This is great, honey. What's the crunchy stuff?"
    "M&Ms. I ran out of paprika."

    Family Guy

  3. #3
    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by chrystally View post
    Hello,
    I recently interviewed with a planning firm that I've heard has a good reputation. They ended up offering me the job. It would require me to relocate to a new city. However, this is where it all gets a little questionable:
    ...
    My question to you all...is this unprofessional behaviour? Even though my salary would probably increase and there's potential to do more of the work I'd like to be doing, do you think I should still take the job? I'm worried that this is an example of what's to come which is something I don't really want to me apart of.
    Sounds like normal human behavior in some firms and in many industries. Planning has normal humans too. This is not to say we should condone such behavior. But we should expect it.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Tide's avatar
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    Is this a small based business, though well established you said? I think they could be busy, I don't know if you are applying for entry level or not, but obviously whoever is hiring you is also busy with other work. That said, I would maybe formulate an email with your basic questions and leave some blank spaces in between the questions so they can shoot you an email back quickly. Also, there may be someone in HR you can continue the hiring questions with. Often the interviewers don't have all the answers like the ones you are asking.

    Editorial: if you are unemployed an this is your best offer/only offer I wouldn't push back too much and just get the details you need to start. A job is a job.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for all the feedback!
    I wouldn't call this a small business, the office I'd be working at employs approx. 60 people however there are about 5 other office locations for the entire company.

    I do currently hold a full-time job, this would be more of lateral move however more directly involved in the planning field, which is what I'm looking for. So I'm currently not in a position where I'm going from being unemployed to being desperate to take whatever comes along.

    As nrschmid stated, an offer isn't an offer until received in writing. So I will wait until I receive a solid written offer with everything laid out in front of me before I make my final decision.

    I've never really had to do this before, the job I'd be leaving was one I started pretty much out of college. So I'm just a little unfamiliar with the whole process!

    Cheers

  6. #6
    It may be unprofessional but its very common. Depending on which kind of organization you're applying for, you can be subjected to varying degrees of bureaucratic nonsense and ineptitude. But an offer is an offer. I wouldn't turn your nose up at it just yet.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian
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    I'd send them an email. Up the ante. Assuming these two firms are competitive, you just may conceivably feel exposed at the moment.. for example, I am in a part of the industry where everybody knows each other and where a degree of game playing is not unheard of. If it leaks that you have an offer out there (or if they leak it, in order to get you to agree with whatever terms they may care to offer), your current firm may choose to take precipitous action. If this is a potential concern, you should discretely (and very politely) convey this to the hiring firm, in order to hint at this and emphasize to them the importance of getting back to you quickly and in turn hinting that you will get back to them quickly with your decision, one way or another. It may be they need to get a final board approval or something.. but then let them tell you that's the case and indicate to you how much time it will take.

    In my last transition, I felt a bit under the gun. I was offered the position by the CEO verbally without any details. I then received a call, much later the same day (a Thursday), from another member of the partnership, who gave me a proposal verbally, and went over a number of other issues with me, including his views on a possible start date, transition planning, team and marketing responsibilities, likely exclusivity demands, etc, etc. and that I should take some time to consider what he just proposed. He also casually mentioned that, by the way, he saw my current boss in his office that day (maybe that was a completely innocuous statement, maybe it wasn't!). I then received a letter confirming what he said the next morning, and his package provided me with their benefits and other details. I replied the same day with a counter-proposal to HR (saying that I was wondering whether it was worthwhile considering the following amendments to the proposal, but without indicating an acceptance or saying explicitly that acquiescence on those points would trigger an acceptance of it, by me). This was, in turn, accepted the same day.. HR then said, "take the weekend to think about this." At this point I knew I was totally exposed. That's when I reached out to anyone I could (including posting here), asking for advice on the details of their proposal. Nobody replied in a useful manner, but I still felt that I had to give them a written acceptance by first thing Monday morning and start having the difficult internal conversations quickly and I did so.

    Here's a possible email for you to send:

    Dear [peter/paul/mary],

    Thank you so much for meeting with me the other day. I enjoyed our conversation; it really reiterated for me [insert specific nicety about why you feel that working for the firm will be mutually benefial and/or how you can help them achieve their stated strategic and/or hiring objectives].

    I am writing to convey my appreciation for your verbal offer for employment with [firm or agency name] as [specific title, with grade if you have it]. I am very interested in continuing our conversation with a view toward bringing it to a mutually satisfactory conclusion. To this end, I look forward to receiving and reviewing your compensation proposal this week. It sounds like I will soon have some planning to do. My current employer has a [x] week notice period, which means I can start with you as early as [...]. Of course, my relationships will be of great value to you in my prospective new capacity, and I would like to make sure that I handle a transition from [current employer] appropriately and expeditiously.

    Again, thank you for the consideration, and I look forward to hearing back from you. Please call me at [mobile number], at your earliest convenience. I am available tomorrow morning, anytime between [give a narrow timeframe].

    Yours sincerely,
    Last edited by Cismontane; 21 Oct 2011 at 9:06 PM.

  8. #8
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    Again, thank you for all the feedback. I did end up taking the job and am happily enjoying the new position and work environment.
    Just one of those situations where you feel like you're the only one dealing with this...but in the end I just needed to let things come as they may

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