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Thread: Textbook recommendations for statistics

  1. #1
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    Textbook recommendations for statistics

    I will be teaching an introductory statistics course in a Masters in Urban Planning program next year. If you are currently a graduate student taking a statistics course or recently completed a statistics course please let me know if there is a textbook that you particularly liked or disliked.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    I'm taking a graduate level statistics course right now. The main book we use is Statistical Analysis: An Interdisciplinary Introduction to Univariate and Multivariate Methods by Sam Kachigan. I wasn't fond of the book when the course started, but gradually I've come to think of it as a good textbook and one that might be worth keeping even after the course ends.

  3. #3
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    Healey

    We used Statistics: A Tool for Social Research by Joseph Healey. I think it's a fantastic book and very practical. Explains the statistical concepts in normal words for those without an MIT background in Math. I'm at an Australian university, however it's an American textbook and our professor did her PhD at UC Berkley.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian WSU MUP Student's avatar
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    I'm a few years out of grad school but we used a book called "Essential Statistics for Public Managers and Policy Analysts" by Evan Berman and I still keep it by my desk in my office and refer to it quite frequently (a few times a year). It's one of only three textbooks I found informative enough to keep and actually bring into the office so take that for what it's worth (the other two textbooks that I've brought in are both GIS books).
    "Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost." - 1980 Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan

  5. #5
    Cyburbian
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    Not specifically for planners but nice and easy to understand - particularly when working with SPSS. We are using the following textbook for our students:

    Field, A. (2009) Discovering Statistics Using SPSS

  6. #6
    Cyburbian FueledByRamen's avatar
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    "Community Analysis and Planning Techniques" by Richard E. Klosterman is a good book for population estimates and forecasting methods.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian
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    We used Meier, Brudney, and Bohte's Applied Statistics for Public & Nonprofit Administration in the statistics/research methods course here at UMass. The authors have a quirky sense of humor that can show up unexpectedly, and which sometimes trumps opportunities to explain things: "Techniques exist for handling many types of non-homoscedasticity, but they are fairly advanced. The term homoscedasticity is a good one to know. The manager can always disturb her statistician by asking her whether the homoscedasticity assumption is met." (Notice that we are now focused on office foibles, instead of discussing techniques for handling what I assume is heteroscedasticity.) Imperfect editing means that the solutions to odd-numbered problems in the back of the book are not always correct, but that might just be more evidence of their quirky sense of humor. As the name implies, it explains by way of "real world" example whenever it can. Students who would like to learn the theory behind the application might not enjoy this presentation as much, but it would fit well in a program geared towards municipal/regional planning practice.

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