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Thread: "CNU-A CNU accreditation

  1. #26
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    Informational Update

    Apparently CPSURaf, you have been in an isolation cell since November 2008 and recently released. Let me help you here and bring you as current as I can on the employment scene for all the variations in the true design professions (e.g. architects, landscape architects, urban designers and various engineering disciplines (e.g. civil,mechanical, electrical, structural) interior designers) and the equally important and supportive planning realms (e.g. urban, current and long-range, environmental, natural resources even horticulturists turned planners). We have been in what is now being referred to as the Lesser Depression (thank you Paul Krugman NYT). It used to be referred to as the Great Recession, and later on the Great Desperation.

    Private sector design and planning firms around the country (no metro region was unaffected, none of them) have nearly cut themselves between 30%-50% in staffing since the real beginning (2007)of the never ending recession that was supposed to have been over in 2009. Many large to medium sized firms have been bought out or merged. The other mid to small sized firms that were not that fortunate, have become a shadow of their former selves, are now nothing more than one person home office operations with an email address and cellphone, or have entirely vaporized.

    As far as planning in the public sector, the picture is equally or more bleak. There are several threads here that by now I am sure you might be catching up on, now that your free again, about the hemorraging of jobs at all levels, local, county, regional, state and now even federal. Many of the public sector agencies have purged about the same percentage of all jobs (as in the range referred to above) directly and indirectly related to planning, community development, including completely eradicated redevelopment agencies in our own fair state. Some cities in California no longer have their own employees in planning and community development and have hired stand-in mercenaries. This downsprial of this sad nationwide cycle started to really become noticeable in the summer of 2008. Their is no hopeful sign, no savior or bailout, or light at the end of any tunnel or other hole that this will reverse itself anytime soon. Best case prediction, we will start digging ourselves out around 2017, when those states that got hammered the worst and lost most of still missing 6,000,000 (an underestimate) jobs get back to their pre-2007 employment llevels.

    The few public sector planning positions that are open and advertised now a days receive more applications and resumes than Google receives in one hour. Chances are, if your on the dark side of planning right now, your agency has been hit and hard. I don't care if you have no acronyms after your name or more letters then are in a can of alphabet soup, in many cases it made or still makes little difference.

    For those of you who will seize on that last statement and attempt to flip it around on me, I got the CNU-A in 2008 along with many other design and planning professionals who had to surf and survive through that first tsunami of layoffs. Many, many others sought new certifications including AEP and ATP, and thought that would give them a distinct advantage. stateside, I have no idea if it did for anyone other than me. Sure I was fortunate and got interviews for some of the incredibly small number of jobs available then (2008) and the ones that are even in shorter supply now. Unfortunately, no cigar or brass ring on that merry-go-round.

    By contrast, those same licenses and certifications allowed me to have my choice of jobs internationally. I still would much rather practice our shared professions back in our own country. Just sayin.
    Last edited by landplnr2001; 24 Jun 2012 at 8:00 AM.

  2. #27
    OH....IO Hink's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by landplnr2001 View post
    Apparently CPSURaf, you have been in an isolation cell since November 2008 and recently released. Let me help you here and bring you as current as I can on the employment scene for all the variations in the true design professions (e.g. architects, landscape architects, urban designers and various engineering disciplines (e.g. civil,mechanical, electrical, structural) interior designers) and the equally important and supportive planning realms (e.g. urban, current and long-range, environmental, natural resources even horticulturists turned planners). We have been in what is now being referred to as the Lesser Depression (thank you Paul Krugman NYT). It used to be referred to as the Great Recession, and later on the Great Desperation.

    Private sector design and planning firms around the country (no metro region was unaffected, none of them) have nearly cut themselves between 30%-50% in staffing since the real beginning (2007)of the never ending recession that was supposed to have been over in 2009. Many large to medium sized firms have been bought out or merged. The other mid to small sized firms that were not that fortunate, have become a shadow of their former selves, are now nothing more than one person home office operations with an email address and cellphone, or have entirely vaporized.
    I think Raf's point was that you think this accreditation is important, and yet you are unable to leverage it to find employment. I think that fact speaks volumes to the value. If a bunch of letters was going to produce better development or a more rounded individual, I would consider that in hiring. But I find those who support CNU in general much more ivory tower than those who received more realistic educations. I actually would probably look at strong CNU support as a negative, as many believe that the transect will solve all the problems of the universe, and have no grasp on the realities of day to day planning.

    I surely wouldn't hire an urban designer or landscape architect to make planning or land use decisions. I know better than that. Just as I would hope an LA wouldn't hire a planner to design a landscape plan.


    Quote Originally posted by landplnr2001 View post
    The few public sector planning positions that are open and advertised now a days receive more applications and resumes than Google receives in one hour. Chances are, if your on the dark side of planning right now, your agency has been hit and hard. I don't care if you have no acronyms after your name or more letters then are in a can of alphabet soup, in many cases it made or still makes little difference.
    The thing I find interesting about this discussion, is that you are preaching to the people who are largely employed, and by and large make hiring decisions for their community / private firm. You are speaking from "experience" to people who already have experience. When you preach, try to make it less condescending and you will have a better result.

    We welcome a diverse range of ideas and ideals on Cyburbia. Try having a more cordial discussion without attacking the person who disagrees with you. That will keep you around and not have you find the banhammer.
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  3. #28
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    Quote Originally posted by landplnr2001;635724I
    already deal and have deait with such matters as a LICENSED landscape architect.
    You mean that profession that didn't require a license in all fifty states until 2010? I'm impressed. And don't even get me started on 1000 Friends, they can be as bad for Oregon as they have been good, trust me I know.

    That said, everyone in here needs to dial it back a notch. Seriously, you all sound like children arguing about who has the toughest Daddy. Aside from from FEMA floodplain credentials (that I would never put behind my name), I have none. Zero. Nada. Anyone who wants to go toe to toe on what they know and what they can do, you'd better have experience in many fields. I hire planning consultants, sometimes out of the planning mecca that is Portland, and know what? All the letters behind the names get ignored. Really. I couldn't care less what book knowledge you have, I want to see what you've done with it, so that what I look for when I hire.
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  4. #29
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    Quote Originally posted by Hink View post
    I find those who support CNU in general much more ivory tower than those who received more realistic educations. I actually would probably look at strong CNU support as a negative, as many believe that the transect will solve all the problems of the universe, and have no grasp on the realities of day to day planning.
    Quote Originally posted by Mastiff View post
    All the letters behind the names get ignored. Really. I couldn't care less what book knowledge you have, I want to see what you've done with it, so that what I look for when I hire.
    I see a million letters, I think someone is either unsure of their value or hiding something. And slavish adherence to the transect tells me you cannot think or don't practice on the ground.

    Nevertheless, this dovetails nicely with several other discussions on this board about the purpose and usefulness of AICP, letters that carry no stamp or guarantee, but cost a lot to obtain and maintain.
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  5. #30
    Cyburbian mike gurnee's avatar
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    If interviewing an applicant with CNU credentials, I would ask what are the weaknesses of NU. The response would be critical to my hiring decision.

  6. #31
    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    Sorry Mastiff.. but this really chaps me..

    Quote Originally posted by landplnr2001 View post
    Apparently CPSURaf, you have been in an isolation cell since November 2008 and recently released. Let me help you here and bring you as current as I can on the employment scene for all the variations in the true design professions...
    Private sector design and planning firms around the country (no metro region was unaffected, none of them) have nearly cut themselves between 30%-50% in staffing since the real beginning (2007)of the never ending recession that was supposed to have been over in 2009. Many large to medium sized firms have been bought out or merged. The other mid to small sized firms that were not that fortunate, have become a shadow of their former selves, are now nothing more than one person home office operations with an email address and cellphone, or have entirely vaporized.
    Ok.. I know. Why.. because I was in the private sector during this time. Yea, i helped entitle, some of my projects got built, some sit vacant, and others well.. the pipe dream ran out in 2008, and yes I feel partially responsible for some of glut in California, and yea, I was also punch drunk on the whole let's make money thing, but to sit there and grandstand and not know anything about my professional past is a slap in my face imo. I saw some of my best friends laid off, as well as some damn good planners, architects and landscape architects, engineers and surveyors. I held on as long as I could thanks to a great mentor and boss who tried to keep me on the payroll doing other non-planning related things in the office. I worked hard to bring in more work and compete for what little was left. I didn't work for 8 weeks yet my firm didn't lay me off in early 2010. My wife lost her job and we had our 2nd baby on the way. I had no way to pay for a mortgage let alone food on the table. I signed up for food stamps man, so please, don't patronize me with my isolation "cell" since November of 2008. I didn't have the luxury of getting my "certificates on". Instead i looked for work outside of the profession and it sucked. Every night i would look for new jobs across the country where my family could move. Putting together resumes, cut-sheets, portfolio examples for each job I was qualified for. I got interviews based on my resume and portfolio, not my 4 letters behind my name...

    Quote Originally posted by landplnr2001 View post
    As far as planning in the public sector, the picture is equally or more bleak. There are several threads here that by now I am sure you might be catching up on, now that your free again, about the hemorraging of jobs at all levels, local, county, regional, state and now even federal. Many of the public sector agencies have purged about the same percentage of all jobs (as in the range referred to above) directly and indirectly related to planning, community development, including completely eradicated redevelopment agencies in our own fair state. Some cities in California no longer have their own employees in planning and community development and have hired stand-in mercenaries. ...
    Yea.. i know that too, guess what, I was a stand in "mercenary" from 2008-2010. And it was fine, it paid me, kept me employed, kept me impartial, and led me to my next job in the public sector. I agree with your assessment, and frankly it should scare newly minted planners, which is why people ask advice on this site on how to get ahead and compete for what little is left out there...

    I don't care if you have no acronyms after your name or more letters then are in a can of alphabet soup, in many cases it made or still makes little difference.
    Your right.. which is why many of us have said the CNU-A makes little to no difference. The original poster asked the following:

    Has anyone pursued the CNU-A accreditation?
    Some said they have, some said it was a scam (including myself). Many of us professionals just don't see the usefulness in this accreditation. Unless you are in the private sector going after RFPs that are requesting practitioners to be CNU-A, than there is really no benefit to this accreditation, especially to a newly minted grad or those looking for work for quite sometime. Rarely will you see a job posting requiring this (mainly private sector) and even if you did come across it, this would not be a factor in hiring someone that brings the tools and work necessary to fill in the void at said organization.
    follow me on the twitter @rcplans

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally posted by CPSURaf View post
    Sorry Mastiff.. but this really chaps me...
    Shoot at the post, not the poster. That's just fine. Everyone get that? Good!
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  8. #33
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    We have reached equilibrium here

    Now that I have attempted to counter the crass condescension and muted arrogance that was flowing through this thread before I showed up, let's dial it way back for the sake of professional respect and civility. I'm on board if the rest of you can lower the volume here.

  9. #34
    Quote Originally posted by landplnr2001 View post
    Now that I have attempted to counter the crass condescension and muted arrogance that was flowing through this thread before I showed up, let's dial it way back for the sake of professional respect and civility. I'm on board if the rest of you can lower the volume here.
    Uh, I'm pretty sure you're the one who started the descent into condescension, arrogance, disrespect, and incivility.

  10. #35
    Gunfighter Mastiff's avatar
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    I'm pretty sure it'll end here no matter what.

    Carry on..
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  11. #36
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    Sorry to disappoint the multiple snarks and sharks here

    Well Mastif you were close to being right about it ending here, but based on you dependably continuing to mimic my ocassional lapses here into less than courteous commentary, I need to lapse again.

    Your absolutely right, I do not know what state it was but I believe licensure for landscape architects hit the full 50 in 2010. We started in 1957 (or thereabouts in my home state of CA). As far the planning profession, I have, along with thousands of others, the only credential offering some evidence of basic competency in the profession of planning, namely AICP. I have no idea what acronym follows your last name, maybe it is just empty space, and your absolutely right none of that matters.

    What does matter is fair and objective comparison between the two professions.What amounts to licensure for planners only exists in two states currently, New Jersey and Michigan. That is two, with 48 to go. Sometime between the now and the end of the 21st century, if the planning profession stages a comeback and gains greater public and governmental legitimacy once again, which it will, there might be at least a "title" standing for planners throughout the whole country. Something to look forward to you if you live that long.

    In parting, I am very proud to have lived, worked and practiced in the mecca of planning that is Portland. Like every other major metro area in the US, it has been devastated by the Lesser Depression and there are very, very few jobs in the true design professions and their allied support groups, like planning. A real planning position opens about once every two months and it experiences a shark-feeding frenzy of highly competitive interest. After all, most every planner wants to be a pilgrim to Portland and greater Oregon. There is an overabundance of bachelors and masters graduates from the outstanding planning programs of Portland State and U of O, who, if they are fortunate enough, are full time baristas or work in booming food cart scene.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally posted by jamesrouse View post
    Has anyone pursued the CNU-A accreditation? Seems that you take an online class from the University of Miami and then can sit for the exam.

    http://www.cnu.org/accreditation

    10. How do I prepare for the Exam?


    A recommended reading list has been developed for the exam, see below. In addition, the University of Miami School of Architecture offers a The Principles and Practice of New Urbanism course online three times a year.

    Charter of the New Urbanism, cnu.org/charter
    New Urbanism: Best Practices Guide, 4th edition, by Robert Steuteville, Philip Langdon, et. al. (Ithaca, NY: New Urban Publications, 2009).
    Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream by Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, and Jeff Speck (New York: North Point Press, a division of Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2000).
    Sustainable Street Network Principles by CNU Project for Transportation Reform (2012).
    If it's something that interests you, I say go for it. It definitely won't hurt.

  13. #38
    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    Did we just witness some sort of Internet Performance Art?
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  14. #39
    Gunfighter Mastiff's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by landplnr2001 View post
    Well Mastif you were close to being right about it ending here, but based on you dependably continuing to mimic my ocassional lapses here into less than courteous commentary, I need to lapse again.
    Mastiff, double f, like the dog breed. Be careful how you lapse, as I have been quite fair in saying everyone needs to dial it back. However, I chuckle at arrogance and condescension, I simply won't tolerate personal attack.

    Quote Originally posted by landplnr2001 View post
    Your absolutely right, I do not know what state it was but I believe licensure for landscape architects hit the full 50 in 2010. We started in 1957 (or thereabouts in my home state of CA). As far the planning profession, I have, along with thousands of others, the only credential offering some evidence of basic competency in the profession of planning, namely AICP. I have no idea what acronym follows your last name, maybe it is just empty space, and your absolutely right none of that matters.
    Vermont.

    If you haven't heard the joke, people say AICP stands for "any idiot can plan." That said, I've seen good and bad, like in any profession, irrespective of letters. As I stated before, I have no initials and don't care if I get them. What I do have is BLarch, some time in law school, and a work history that is very diverse. Yes, I do planning and can write code from scratch, but I have also worked for many years in engineering. Then, along with planning, did code enforcement, building inspection, grant writing and administration, floodplain management, and so on. And for the past 11 years, been the director of both planning and public works. (That means I can design parks... then actually go build them! It's awesome!)

    Stack up your letters and see how high they compare to that when looking for work.

    Quote Originally posted by landplnr2001 View post
    What does matter is fair and objective comparison between the two professions.What amounts to licensure for planners only exists in two states currently, New Jersey and Michigan. That is two, with 48 to go. Sometime between the now and the end of the 21st century, if the planning profession stages a comeback and gains greater public and governmental legitimacy once again, which it will, there might be at least a "title" standing for planners throughout the whole country. Something to look forward to you if you live that long.
    I won't. I wouldn't care, either. Legitimacy isn't based on passing a test to me, it's the quality of what you do and how you act. I had an engineer in the firm where I worked who started drinking at 10:00 a.m. We started double checking all his work when he put a storm pipe 15' in the ground because .5% is a long way from .05% even in a short run. I know architects I wouldn't trust to design a doghouse. The same goes for contractors, inspectors, planners, and just about anyone.

    Quote Originally posted by landplnr2001 View post
    In parting, I am very proud to have lived, worked and practiced in the mecca of planning that is Portland. Like every other major metro area in the US, it has been devastated by the Lesser Depression and there are very, very few jobs in the true design professions and their allied support groups, like planning. A real planning position opens about once every two months and it experiences a shark-feeding frenzy of highly competitive interest. After all, most every planner wants to be a pilgrim to Portland and greater Oregon. There is an overabundance of bachelors and masters graduates from the outstanding planning programs of Portland State and U of O, who, if they are fortunate enough, are full time baristas or work in booming food cart scene.
    I'm happy for you. I work in Oregon, too, as do others on the board. What I always tell the new planners that come here is to get experience in as many aspects as possible, and avoid the pigeon holes of bigger firms. I can say that with some confidence, since I actually hire people.
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  15. #40
    Cyburbian MacheteJames's avatar
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    I, for one, am loving the knives-out debate in this thread. Something we've been sorely lacking on this site in general, and in this subforum specifically - there's been little to discuss in the way of career development since so many of us are fighting a rear guard action to maintain what we have, rather than advance professionally.

  16. #41
    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by MacheteJames View post
    I, for one, am loving the knives-out debate in this thread. Something we've been sorely lacking on this site in general, and in this subforum specifically - there's been little to discuss in the way of career development since so many of us are fighting a rear guard action to maintain what we have, rather than advance professionally.
    What you trying to say CM credit doesn't advance you professionally?

    Honestly, the head of our PW department wants to me to take the PE exam. I have put some serious thought and he offered to take me under his wing. I know that is completely different from CNU-A, but hey it advances right?

    I still am a firm believer in ULI. I wish we could afford a membership, simply because their publications and their conferences were far superior to APA. I learned more sitting in on a one day session of public-private partnerships than any APA publication or conference.
    follow me on the twitter @rcplans

  17. #42
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by landplnr2001 View post
    What does matter is fair and objective comparison between the two professions.What amounts to licensure for planners only exists in two states currently, New Jersey and Michigan. That is two, with 48 to go. Sometime between the now and the end of the 21st century, if the planning profession stages a comeback and gains greater public and governmental legitimacy once again, which it will, there might be at least a "title" standing for planners throughout the whole country. Something to look forward to you if you live that long.

    AICP next to your name will get you hired faster in Michigan than having a state liscence. Most planners in the State do not have the moniker Professional Community Planner. It as seen as a redundant test.

    In my opinion getting a CNU certification is about as usefull for a planner as being a doctor of optometry.
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  18. #43
    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner View post
    AICP next to your name will get you hired faster in Michigan than having a state liscence.
    We just got back recently from SE MI for a wedding. My wife was aghast at the built environment, so I'm not sure that's a ringing endorsement. And we went all over heck's half-acre trying to see everyone I hadn't seen in a decade.

    Nevertheless I'm also a ULI fan and second the endorsement (not for letters on a business card, tho).
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  19. #44
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    My experience with ULI around here, though limited, has led me to believe that it's dominated by the big money, private sector real estate development crowd. Both planning and the nonprofit/CDC spheres seem to get a secondary focus at best. Maybe this is just the case in the NYC area, where the real estate industry is absurdly powerful, but that's been my experience. Then again, we all know how lame APA National tends to be, so I'm not sure what the answer is.

  20. #45
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
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    You can count me as a fan for ULI for one big reason: they address what is perhaps the biggest weakness among planners & designers--a sometimes poor understanding of the money game. You don't necessarily need to join ULI, but I encourage all planners to attend at least a few of their seminars & events if only to gain a better understanding of a real estate developer's perspective.

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

  21. #46
    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Suburb Repairman View post
    You can count me as a fan for ULI for one big reason: they address what is perhaps the biggest weakness among planners & designers--a sometimes poor understanding of the money game. You don't necessarily need to join ULI, but I encourage all planners to attend at least a few of their seminars & events if only to gain a better understanding of a real estate developer's perspective.
    Couldn't have said it better SR. Gaining an understanding on the financing of projects provides planners a leg up on getting "the rug pulled under them" for more controversial projects or conversely gaining an understanding on how mixed-use projects and other higher density residential projects require certain capital investment and/or liability coverage just to get off the ground, to which were government can step in through public-private partnerships if a project is truly beneficial for a community.
    follow me on the twitter @rcplans

  22. #47
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    A potential threat to the public's health, safety and welfare

    I won't. I wouldn't care, either. Legitimacy isn't based on passing a test to me, it's the quality of what you do and how you act. I had an engineer in the firm where I worked who started drinking at 10:00 a.m. We started double checking all his work when he put a storm pipe 15' in the ground because .5% is a long way from .05% even in a short run. I know architects I wouldn't trust to design a doghouse. The same goes for contractors, inspectors, planners, and just about anyone. d

    Mastif (you really wanted to project power and pomposity with that username, didn't ya ?) You have made it abundantly clear that current position and title, irrespective of any license or credential you can design anything you want. Do not get redundant and repetitive again. Since you have exhibited borderline disrespect and near absolute arrogance is dissing the design professions, my worst fear is that the above quote is completely autobiographical. If I have exposed you here, please seek the employee assistance programs that are available to you as a public sector employee.

    As for a dog house for you or your real Mastif, architects regularly participate in fund raising events for very worthwhile causes (including Alcoholics Anonymous) where the design really amazing and outrageous doghouses for people to bid on. They also do the same thing for playhouses. Look it up. The true and legitmate design professions are really quite community oriented and benevolent of their proven talents.

    As for the parks you claim to have designed and gotten built, that would be most likely be under an engineers stamp and seal since you have indirectly admitted your not a licensed landscape architect. Glad you could use someone else's professional imprimatur to get your design "built". Tell ya what..... you tell me what parks you "designed" and had built and the next time I'm in Portland, I will be happy to visit them and give you free of charge, a post-occupancy analysis, which is essentially a design crit. You remember those from school, right ? Objective, thoughtful and acute analysis and critique in the design professions is always welcome, or should be, because it always offers an alternative viewpoint, things we might have missed, never considered or just completely overlooked. I'm sure you being the open and accessible type, would welcome that.

    While I am there, I will design the doghouse of your dreams, in five minutes with a sketch you can get a building permit with.

  23. #48
    Gunfighter Mastiff's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by landplnr2001 View post
    I won't. I wouldn't care, either. Legitimacy isn't based on passing a test to me, it's the quality of what you do and how you act. I had an engineer in the firm where I worked who started drinking at 10:00 a.m. We started double checking all his work when he put a storm pipe 15' in the ground because .5% is a long way from .05% even in a short run. I know architects I wouldn't trust to design a doghouse. The same goes for contractors, inspectors, planners, and just about anyone.

    Mastif (you really wanted to project power and pomposity with that username, didn't ya ?) You have made it abundantly clear that current position and title, irrespective of any license or credential you can design anything you want. Do not get redundant and repetitive again. Since you have exhibited borderline disrespect and near absolute arrogance is dissing the design professions, my worst fear is that the above quote is completely autobiographical. If I have exposed you here, please seek the employee assistance programs that are available to you as a public sector employee.
    Actually, I've owned and rescued the breed for probably longer than you've been alive. By now consciously misspelling the name, you only show your ass. You've exposed nothing except your own ignorance, as I haven't "dissed" any profession, only that all of them have people in them that aren't very good. Your responses make me think you are just the kind to which I refer.

    Quote Originally posted by landplnr2001 View post
    As for a dog house for you or your real Mastif, architects regularly participate in fund raising events for very worthwhile causes (including Alcoholics Anonymous) where the design really amazing and outrageous doghouses for people to bid on. They also do the same thing for playhouses. Look it up. The true and legitmate design professions are really quite community oriented and benevolent of their proven talents.
    And? I know people from all walks of life who participate in fundraising events. Is this some kind of point?

    Quote Originally posted by landplnr2001 View post
    As for the parks you claim to have designed and gotten built, that would be most likely be under an engineers stamp and seal since you have indirectly admitted your not a licensed landscape architect. Glad you could use someone else's professional imprimatur to get your design "built". Tell ya what..... you tell me what parks you "designed" and had built and the next time I'm in Portland, I will be happy to visit them and give you free of charge, a post-occupancy analysis, which is essentially a design crit. You remember those from school, right ? Objective, thoughtful and acute analysis and critique in the design professions is always welcome, or should be, because it always offers an alternative viewpoint, things we might have missed, never considered or just completely overlooked. I'm sure you being the open and accessible type, would welcome that.
    I'll pass. I don't want a loon like you anywhere near me, and certainly don't need you to "crit" my work. Once you have a resume, you'll understand.

    Quote Originally posted by landplnr2001 View post
    While I am there, I will design the doghouse of your dreams, in five minutes with a sketch you can get a building permit with.
    Same deal, I'll pass. You're just a troll.
    Last edited by Mastiff; 26 Jun 2012 at 12:07 AM.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    C'mon and get me you twist of fate
    I'm standing right here Mr. Destiny
    If you want to talk well then I'll relate
    If you don't so what cause you don't scare me

  24. #49
    BANNED
    Registered
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
    12

    A reconsideration and a explicit warning

    I really do appreciate the comments about a ULI membership. I have often considered a membership in this organization and know it would benefit me (only if I participated locally) far more than a CNU accreditation, but I made my choice and will have to live with it for now. If I am in a better place with more renumeration in the coming months, then I will certainly reconsider. Thank you all for your comments in that regard.

    Mastiff with two "FF'S" . You need to get immediately real with what I am putting down here. Myself and my interconnected licensed colleagues completely agree that you have, based on what you have disclosed here, potentially stepped way over the line in what may constitute practicing landscape architecture without a license even in an incognito manner. Oregon is both a title and practice state
    .
    Even with the consideration of you being a law school dropout, you should now the significance and meaning of those terms. Any complaint to the Oregon State Landscape Architecture Board (OSLAB) gets investigated, fully and completely no matter what the allegation. The party that makes the complaint retains complete anonymity throughout and beyond the results of the investigation. You won't. You have savaged one of the true, licensed and accredited design professions here on several counts and, while we have a certain tolerance for such disdain and disregard, you have crossed that line. I for one, have promoted the necessity and purpose of even an AICP credential here. You have completely discredited that, on more than one account. Trust me on this, I will not report you, but my very upset colleagues will.

    Whatever governmental body you work for in your stated capacity of some kind of Planning and Public Works director or something resembling that, will also become fully informed of the complaint and the subsequent investigation.

    I urge you to stop your spouting off here. This is serious stuff and you do not need any other distraction or interference while you try to justify your current position and keep your job.

    Fellow Cyburbians, please persuasively weigh in here and talk some sense into this cretin before he receives a certified letter that will require him to answer to his own admissions and really make his tenuous standing, even more so.

  25. #50
    Gunfighter Mastiff's avatar
    Registered
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Middle of a Dusty Street
    Posts
    6,392
    Quote Originally posted by landplnr2001 View post
    I really do appreciate the comments about a ULI membership. I have often considered a membership in this organization and know it would benefit me (only if I participated locally) far more than a CNU accreditation, but I made my choice and will have to live with it for now. If I am in a better place with more renumeration in the coming months, then I will certainly reconsider. Thank you all for your comments in that regard.

    Mastiff with two "FF'S" . You need to get immediately real with what I am putting down here. Myself and my interconnected licensed colleagues completely agree that you have, based on what you have disclosed here, potentially step way over the line in what may constitute practicing landscape architecture without a license. Oregon is both a title and practice state.
    Even with the consideration of you being a law school dropout, you should now the significance and meaning of those terms. Any complaint to the Oregon State Landscape Architecture Board (OSLAB) gets investigated, fully and completely no matter what the allegation. The party that makes the complaint retains complete anonymity throughout and beyond the results of the investigation. You won't. You have savaged one of the true, licensed and accredited design professions here on several counts and, while we have a certain tolerance for such disdain and disregard, you have crossed that line. I for one, have promoted the necessity and purpose of even an AICP credential here. You have completely discredited that, on more than one account.

    Whatever governmental body you work for in your stated capacity of some kind of Planning and Public Works director or something resembling that, will also become fully informed of the complaint and the subsequent investigation.

    I urge you to stop your spouting off here. This is serious stuff and you do not need any other distraction or interference while you try to justify your current position and keep your job.
    Fellow Cyburbians, please persuasively weigh in here and talk some sense into this cretin before he receives a certified letter that will require him to answer to his own admissions.
    Good luck with all that...

    In a dozen posts I know all I need to know about you. However, no one else will be weighing in here, because it's closed. I'm certain I will receive dozens of messages trying to get me to amend my evils ways and bow at the alter of the Holy Post Nominal Letters. Yes, I best reevaluate my entire career, nay, life! Woe is me... woe is me.

    See? I'm reformed.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    C'mon and get me you twist of fate
    I'm standing right here Mr. Destiny
    If you want to talk well then I'll relate
    If you don't so what cause you don't scare me

Closed thread
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