Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: From Planning to Engineering?

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Phoenix
    Posts
    1

    From Planning to Engineering?

    I graduated from ASU with degrees in urban planning and physical geography (focusing on GIS). I've worked a few years now, mostly in unrelated areas, but this past year I managed to obtain a position with Maricopa County that is close to being related to those degrees. They're putting me through courses run through the state to gain knowledge on taxation and other areas, including more advanced areas of GIS.

    I still would like to go back to school for my graduate degree. However, I'm not so sure the MUEP at ASU is all that impressive. It has been a few years since I graduated with my undergrad in 2009, but I remain unconvinced that much has changed. They tend to focus more on theory than anything else. Its still an option but I'm considering something else: engineering. Does anyone have any idea how difficult engineering would be to get into with a planner's background? I do know there would be several pre-req undergrad courses to get into

  2. #2
    Cyburbian UrbaneSprawler's avatar
    Registered
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    404
    If you're asking about getting a masters degree in Engineering with a Planning undergrad degree, sure it's possible. You don't need to have an undergrad in Engineering to get a masters in Engineering. I think the larger question is what do you ultimately want to do professionally to understand what sort of education might then compliment this.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Plus
    Registered
    Sep 2011
    Location
    newark nj
    Posts
    184
    Quote Originally posted by Dibone View post
    I graduated from ASU with degrees in urban planning and physical geography (focusing on GIS). I've worked a few years now, mostly in unrelated areas, but this past year I managed to obtain a position with Maricopa County that is close to being related to those degrees. They're putting me through courses run through the state to gain knowledge on taxation and other areas, including more advanced areas of GIS.

    I still would like to go back to school for my graduate degree. However, I'm not so sure the MUEP at ASU is all that impressive. It has been a few years since I graduated with my undergrad in 2009, but I remain unconvinced that much has changed. They tend to focus more on theory than anything else. Its still an option but I'm considering something else: engineering. Does anyone have any idea how difficult engineering would be to get into with a planner's background? I do know there would be several pre-req undergrad courses to get into
    Well I've been looking to take just one engineering course at my university so I can graduate with additional certificate along with my MCRP. The engineering professors were trying to dissuade me based on my liberal arts background and ultimately said I could possibly handle 1 or 2 courses in their program. Most of the courses require the ability to do Differential Equations which I believe is the math they teach after Calc 4. I only have College Algebra in my pocket so a lot of courses were out of my realm of possibility. If you're willing to take the time to do it then go for it. I wasn't because I only need one class for a certificate and I'm not adding an extra year to my schooling for a certificate. However, maybe years from now if/when I have a steady planning job, I intend to go and get an undergrad in engineering. Mostly, just to say I have one.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Dec 2006
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    2,793
    This is my second planning job in a row working in an engineering firm, and I just have a planning degree. Unless you have a tight grip on heavy science and advanced math stay clear of engineering. Like architecture school, engineering is a weeding out process. Because the engineering bachelors is so tech heavy, a masters in engineering is usually in a specialized niche of engineering. I would seriously talk with as many practicing engineers who do what you want do to find out about the profession. Keep in mind many, but certainly not all, engineers lack social skills. You can learn a lot through informational interviews and networking with engineers but I think you really need to pound the pavement to get the answers you want from them.
    "This is great, honey. What's the crunchy stuff?"
    "M&Ms. I ran out of paprika."

    Family Guy

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 7
    Last post: 31 Oct 2013, 2:22 PM
  2. Civil engineering and planning
    Career Development and Advice
    Replies: 0
    Last post: 29 Mar 2012, 10:06 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last post: 07 Jan 2010, 2:35 PM
  4. Transportation planning or engineering?
    Transportation Planning
    Replies: 5
    Last post: 02 May 2008, 7:40 PM
  5. Replies: 5
    Last post: 06 Feb 2002, 1:12 PM