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Thread: Luddites vs hi-techies: advantages and disadvantages

  1. #1
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Luddites vs hi-techies: advantages and disadvantages

    Just go ahead and say it.....Let's get it out of the way.......Maister, you're an effin' Luddite! There. Feel better now?

    Yesterday a coworker kicked himself verbally for forgetting to pick up something at the store. Said he frequently does that and wondered what he could do to improve that state of affairs. I suggested he use/make something like what we have.....in our kitchen we have a 'shopping reminder' peg board we got from my grandmother's estate. It's a smallish wooden paddle with a couple dozen or so holes drilled into it (looks kinda like a cribbage board) and next to each hole is listed a common shopping item like: milk, eggs, bread, condiments, flour, etc. This item probably dates back to at least the 1940's because it also has a few items like 'Nervine', 'snuff', and 'X-Lax' listed that appeals to my inner-hipster. This thing is mounted on a wall prominently in the kitchen and whenever we notice we're low or out of something we put a peg in the corresponding hole. It works great and we almost always remember that way to get whatever we need the next time we go to the store.

    The coworker in question gave me a horrified/quizzical expression when I described the device (minus the Nervine and snuff references) and another coworker pipes up 'I have a grocery list app that I use for that'. So technology comes to the rescue once again I've been stewing about it since and it occurs to me the Old School way it's own advantages too - it never breaks, you don't have to worry about keeping it charged, and by having a peg board in the kitchen it has the advantage of allowing everyone in the household to update the list as soon as they notice we're out of something, instead of just relying on the person using an app to compile the list.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  2. #2
    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    The coworker in question gave me a horrified/quizzical expression when I described the device (minus the Nervine and snuff references) and another coworker pipes up 'I have a grocery list app that I use for that'. So technology comes to the rescue once again I've been stewing about it since and it occurs to me the Old School way it's own advantages too - it never breaks, you don't have to worry about keeping it charged, and by having a peg board in the kitchen it has the advantage of allowing everyone in the household to update the list as soon as they notice we're out of something, instead of just relying on the person using an app to compile the list.
    I still use the back of an envelope for my shopping list, so consider me a luddite as well.

  3. #3
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by hilldweller View post
    I still use the back of an envelope for my shopping list, so consider me a luddite as well.
    Let's hear it the for backs of envelopes - it was good enough for Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg!

    You know technology can be a great thing, but by that token the most hi-tech solution is not necessarily the best solution either. I seem to remember the Air Force spending billions on devising sophisticated sensors for some jet to allow pilots to see what was behind them, whereas the Israeli's solution on the same jet was to install some sort of rear view mirror.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  4. #4
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by hilldweller View post
    I still use the back of an envelope for my shopping list, so consider me a luddite as well.
    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    Let's hear it the for backs of envelopes - it was good enough for Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg!
    You know if the USPS goes under, millions of snails will lose their employment applying adhesive to envelopes as well as their only means of long distance travel. And you thought it was called snail mail because it was so slow.

    For God's sake, think of the snail children!!!
    Click image for larger version

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    Just a few cents postage every day can feed little Slimey and Sluggo. Don't let another day go by without helping. Send your contribution to Succor the Snails, you'll be glad you did.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

  5. #5
    Cyburbian ursus's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    Let's hear it the for backs of envelopes - it was good enough for Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg!

    You know technology can be a great thing, but by that token the most hi-tech solution is not necessarily the best solution either. I seem to remember the Air Force spending billions on devising sophisticated sensors for some jet to allow pilots to see what was behind them, whereas the Israeli's solution on the same jet was to install some sort of rear view mirror.
    ...don't forget the famous comparison of NASA's famous "Astronaut Pen" that could make ink flow in zero gravity to the Soviets telling their guys to use a pencil.

    J.S. Bach scrawled many compositions on whatever paper he could find. So much so that the choir boys and deacons used it to wrap up their lunches I think I once heard. You have to wonder if technology would have enhanced or quashed the genius of someone like Bach, or Milton, or take your pick.

    Tell you what, I'm un-installing the Evernote app on my phone RIGHT NOW! You've inspired me, Maister. You freakin' Luddite.
    "...I would never try to tick Hink off. He kinda intimidates me. He's quite butch, you know." - Maister

  6. #6
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    Maister, you're an effin' Luddite!
    We have this thing called a "blackboard" Its awesome. You can write stuff on it and then just erase it with the swish of this special device they call an "eraser." No wasted paper!

    I agree about the advantage of having something posted where everyone can see it and contribute to it. This is one of my pet peeves about the proliferation of "devices." Its all so individually oriented. Ever try to crowd around a laptop to look at something let alone an iPhone/iPod? Its ridiculous. Now, I’m not so much of a fool that I don’t realize the economic advantage of this for the manufacturers. Just like we ALL apparently need a washing machine and dryer and lawnmower because, well, “its good for the economy,” so do we also apparently need a handheld device. Sure, its used to connect us to other people, but only through isolating ourselves from others. I just think its interesting how all the development has been geared toward individual use and not collaborative ones.

    Don’t get me wrong, I think all that technology is pretty dang amazing and I do recognize how transformative all of this has been in such a short time. But I’ll take my scrap paper (or envelope) hand scrawled list copied from the blackboard to the store over my shopping app any day.

    I’m Wahday, and I’m a Luddite, too…

    Quote Originally posted by ursus
    ...don't forget the famous comparison of NASA's famous "Astronaut Pen" that could make ink flow in zero gravity to the Soviets telling their guys to use a pencil.
    That's a good one - and my son has one of those pens!
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

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    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    I guess I have my Luddite cred. I do not have a cell phone. My computer skills are at best functional (I can make an okay map on Arc/GIS and I can get my staff report to look presentable). While my son and wife have fast laptops, I work on a snail-slow desktop at home.

    My son says I should get a Kindle or something like that, because I could store a bunch of books on it. But I like paper. I don't want to have to remember to charge my book. The only real advantage I see to an e-book is reading at night without disturbing the other half.

    I write my shopping list on a piece of scrap paper. And I have a lot of scrap paper, because of the computer age. We use much more paper than we did 30 years ago, because printers waste so much of it. Okay to be fair, the printer isn't wasting the paper, we are.

    I do like that the knowledge of the world is at my fingertips. That is one huge and ultra-cool thing about this electronic age.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  8. #8
    maudit anglais
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    I seem to be right on that generational divide where, while I love the technology I still I prefer writing things out on paper first. I don't think I could use a grocery list app...much easier to use a paper list and I don't have to worry about dropping it/misplacing it while shopping.

  9. #9
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    I would guess the power goes out at our house maybe twice a year - usually due to storms. We seem to fare better than some families do during power outages; when other family members in town lose power they frequently show up at our doorstep.

    We have a good functional fireplace insert in the family room and can heat much of the house during cold weather. We have a couple of kerosene lamps in the family room and bedroom that get used during these times (and occasionally I'll use them at other times just for the ambience). We haven't made candles for several years but have at least a dozen in our 'storm drawer' from our last candle making session for illumination as well. We also keep a set of cast iron cookware (and my favorite Dutch oven) handy for camping, but it also works great with our fireplace during these occasions. We have entirely too much junk in our kitchen cabinets and drawers but the up side of that is much of that stuff is old manual cooking utensils/equipment (e.g. old citrus juicer, can openers, egg beaters, etc) and loss of power is not much of an inconvenience where cooking is concerned. And if the power goes out during the winter months we don’t even have to worry about refrigeration.

    As entertainment goes we like our DVD’s, computer games and wii, as much as anyone, but because we’re a bunch of bookworms losing power is never met with choruses of “I’m bored. What do we do?” There’s a bit of inconvenience with power outages, but on the whole I actually view these times as something of a nice change of pace.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  10. #10
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by otterpop View post

    My son says I should get a Kindle or something like that, because I could store a bunch of books on it. But I like paper.
    I prefer paper, too. But I love taking a Kindle on vacation: you can have hundreds of books, many of them free, without having to haul heavy books or run out on your trip and having to buy more.

    As for grocery lists, the only downside of paper is if you forget to take the paper. Not that I've ever thought of using an "app". I make written lists for everything (RJ rolls his eyes a lot); my grocery list is a post-it note.

    I'm on my second GPS but always have map backups. But maybe having a GPS makes me a Luddite, since I'm not doing GPS on my smartphone.

    I intensively research vacation spots online, but still order the AAA Tour Books, so I guess I'm halvsies on that one. Tradition, you know.

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