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Thread: A spanish pronunciation question and general observation

  1. #1
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    A spanish pronunciation question and general observation

    What is the correct way to pronounce that Mexican pop called "Jarritos"?
    (I'm guessing yar-EE-tohs)

    Is it silly to want to pronounce spanish food items correctly at an authentic mexican restaurant (most of the staff doesnt speak english) when one doesn't speak spanish and it's obvious they are a first-class gringo? or should they just spit out in their twangiest midwestern "Listen sonny boy, get me some of those TAA-coz and bir-EYE-toz with jil-AP-in-oh peppers and make it snappy!"

    Anyone here from Lohz-Ahn-jeh-leez?

    Anyone remember that silly SNL skit with the NPR reporters overpronouncing the hell out of 'foreign' words? (I think Jimmy Smits may have been guest star)
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    More like har-EE-tos but even that doesn't give it quite the right pronunciation because you have roll the double-r.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

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    Cyburbian
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    It's painful to hear many Americans pronounce the name Jesus... If you're not referring to the religious figure, it's pronounced Hay-soos.

    Another one that amuses me is going into a Greek place and hearing someone order a gyro. The G is supposed to be silent if we're talking about a food item.

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Blide View post
    It's painful to hear many Americans pronounce the name Jesus... If you're not referring to the religious figure, it's pronounced Hay-soos.
    There's a lot of words pronounced by english speakers that are no doubt painful. To return to my more general question, why is widely acceptable to anglicize certain foreign words/names but not others? Let's actually use Los Angeles as an example - who here does NOT say Loss-AN-jel-iz? or take a more subtle thing like 'chimichanga' most anglos don't pronounce the i's as ee's do they? yet, that's the proper way.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    What is the correct way to pronounce that Mexican pop called "Jarritos"?
    (I'm guessing yar-EE-tohs)
    Har-Hee-toes

    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    Anyone here from Lohz-Ahn-jeh-leez?
    Lo-s-Han-ELS


    pin-chee green-gos
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  6. #6
    Maybe because I grew up with Spanish, I find it very easy to pronounce words I am not familiar with. Maybe a few Indian words from Mexico can be difficult but that's it. Everyone watches US tv at some point in their lives and is familiar with the anglicization of some words in the US. Not a big deal.

    I think that with only an hour lesson, anyone can learn how to pronounce 99% of spanish words. Even so, most Latinos don't make fun of how Anglos pronounce Spanish words.

    Their bad table manners, however, provide hours of entertainment, we joke about them all the time. So be very self conscious of how you eat.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian stroskey's avatar
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    I burned down the church to atone for my transgressions.

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    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    Is it silly to want to pronounce spanish food items correctly at an authentic mexican restaurant (most of the staff doesnt speak english) when one doesn't speak spanish and it's obvious they are a first-class gringo? or should they just spit out in their twangiest midwestern "Listen sonny boy, get me some of those TAA-coz and bir-EYE-toz with jil-AP-in-oh peppers and make it snappy!"
    Definitely try and pronounce correctly! Besides, its an opportunity to get it right. Instead of pretending you know the correct pronunciation, you can frame it as a question and get on-the-spot advice.

    I’ve spent some time in Texas and that is one of the places that bugs me the most in terms of mis-pronouncing Spanish words. Amarillo, for example, is simply “yellow” in Spanish, but not the way Texans pronounce it. In Austin, people would give you directions down all these Spanish named streets but say them like “San Jackinto” (instead of San Ha-seen-to) or “Gwodaloop” (instead of “Gwa-da-loo-pay” – patron saint of the Americas, incidentally). Of course, Texans manage to find odd ways to pronounce English words, too. But with so many Spanish speakers living there, you’d think they could get it right. Here in New Mexico, there is a great emphasis on getting Spanish pronunciation right. Although New Mexico Spanish has its own peculiarities and other native Spanish speakers sometimes laugh at how folks speak here.
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    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Blide View post
    It's painful to hear many Americans pronounce the name Jesus... If you're not referring to the religious figure, it's pronounced Hay-soos.
    If Jesus was Jewish, why the Puerto Rican name? My Colombian wife hates that joke.

    I also can't get her to stop calling those green citrus fruit "lee-mons." They're limes, dear
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    There seems to be a subtle difference ofos and Raf's pronunciations.....so I'll go with ofos' cuz he didn't try to make fun of me!

    Ah wait, we live in the modern world, why not hear the word with my very own ears....

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRXDu...eature=related
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Raf View post
    pin-chee green-gos
    You rock!
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

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