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Thread: When to start applying for jobs?

  1. #1

    When to start applying for jobs?

    Hi

    So I'm heading into my last year for bachelors in Landscape Architecture (with a push towards planning). I was wondering when to start applying for jobs?
    I don't graduate until July 2013, but I've already done research into a few companies I'd be interested in (both international companies as I want to move countries).

    I havent had an official internship (one week shadowing in an Architects office) and I've spent this last academic year studying abroad in California and travelling to Canada in between, networking along the way.

    Would it be worth also trying to get a few weeks internship over my Easter break?

    Nisha
    UK

  2. #2
    When to start applying for jobs?
    Yesterday. If you do get a job while still finishing up your studies, you may be able to postpone your start date or negotiate a flexible work schedule until you finish.

    I was in a similar situation many years ago. I landed a fulltime job with while being a fulltime student. They were able to off me a very flexible schedule around classes: 7 to 10, 3 to 6 and whatever hours I needed to get to 40 on Saturday.
    The content contrarian

  3. #3
    Cyburbian
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    I think what OfficialPlanner said is ideal. In addition, I would use the Fall semester to network as much as you can, setting up informational interviews, figuring out places you'd like to work (many jobs are often not posted). You can ramp this up during your winter break. It's typical to apply in the Spring for a post-graduation start date as employers often don't know their needs too far in advance (unlike, say Law or Management Consulting).

  4. #4
    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by OfficialPlanner View post
    Yesterday. If you do get a job while still finishing up your studies, you may be able to postpone your start date or negotiate a flexible work schedule until you finish.

    I was in a similar situation many years ago. I landed a fulltime job with while being a fulltime student.
    Mee three, but I started part-time then went to full-time after I finished.

    And I'd caution that the personality type that makes a good LARCH doesn't necessarily make a good planner (or Project Manager, for that matter), IME. Considerable E.
    -------
    Give a man a gun, and he can rob a bank. Give a man a bank, and he can rob the world.

  5. #5
    Hi, thanks for all the feedback! I'll definitely start working on this right now.

    Is there any advantage to applying at smaller firms or bigger multi-discipline business?

    -N

  6. #6
    OH....IO Hink's avatar
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    Retirements usually happen at the end of the year or in the Spring. Understanding who is leaving, and what positions that will most likely open up is key to getting yourself in the door. You can plant a seed for new openings, but if you know a job is going to be available due to a retirement, getting your foot in the door before the job is advertised is always a great opportunity.

    Get to know the planners in your area, or the area you want to work. Networking is key.
    A common mistake people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools. -Douglas Adams

  7. #7
    Cyburbian
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    "Understanding who is leaving, and what positions that will most likely open up is key to getting yourself in the door."

    No.

    I feel bad for fresh grads who network with this mindset. One, there's just something pathetic about it. I could see being that cutthroat to be made partner in a law firm, but not for an entry level gig that will pay less than you could make as a garbage man or a toll collector; and secondly, assuming that retirements equal entry level openings is pure silliness. You still have to somehow get ahead of the Executive Director's friend's kid or his/her neighbor's kid if it's a private or non-profit entity and if it's governmental, there will be a line around the block of patronage candidates.

    Networking schmetworking!

  8. #8
    Cyburbian dvdneal's avatar
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    Apply

    I'd say apply, it can't hurt, but I always seemed to have trouble getting interviews prior to graduation. My best advice is to network and get an internship. If you get the interview, I think they would be willing to work with you on hours. After all, they know you're in school and think you might be what they need. I think a large part of it is how fast does the position need to be filled. Finding out that and the unlisted jobs all depends on the networking everyone mentioned.
    I don't pretend to understand Brannigan's Law. I merely enforce it.

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