Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 53

Thread: Colicky babies

  1. #1
    Cyburbian TerraSapient's avatar
    Registered
    Nov 2009
    Location
    The Glass City
    Posts
    2,610

    Colicky babies

    Anyone out there have any tips for making screaming babies stop crying?

    Sea Monkey is a very grumpy baby. He cries for about 5+ hours every single day. That is not an exaggeration. Every. Single. Day. My ears are bleeding. My head is throbbing. I can't get any meaningful sleep. I seriously question how the species has survived.

    Moderator note:
    Maister: split from RTDNTOTO
    Last edited by Maister; 30 Oct 2012 at 12:20 PM.
    Occupy Your Brain!

  2. #2
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 1996
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    14,584
    Blog entries
    3
    Ouch. No self-rocking cradle? No white noise machine?
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  3. #3
    Cyburbian TerraSapient's avatar
    Registered
    Nov 2009
    Location
    The Glass City
    Posts
    2,610
    We have 3 white noise machines. They are all fails. He likes the swing, but only for about an hour. He cries on and off all day, but from about 8pm to after midnight, he just cries and cries and cries and cries and cries... you get the point.


    After eliminating everything else under the sun, we are fairly sure he just is overly tired at night, but he will not sleep. He won't take a pacifier. There has to be something we can do. Definitely losing my mind right now.
    Occupy Your Brain!

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Otis's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Upper left edge
    Posts
    3,883
    Here is where you make your fortune. Two words: Baby Valium. 1 mg. Or maybe grown-up valium would be better. 10 mg. For you two, of course. And if it happened to get passed on in mother's milk, who is to complain?

    But seriously, folks, I have no idea. I hope he outgrows it soon.

  5. #5
    Corn Burning Fool giff57's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 1998
    Location
    On the Mother River
    Posts
    4,581
    Quote Originally posted by TerraSapient View post
    Anyone out there have any tips for making screaming babies stop crying?

    Sea Monkey is a very grumpy baby. He cries for about 5+ hours every single day. That is not an exaggeration. Every. Single. Day. My ears are bleeding. My head is throbbing. I can't get any meaningful sleep. I seriously question how the species has survived.
    My middle child cried most of the time he was awake. Since he just turned 23, I don't really remember how we dealt with it. For some reason we noticed he would stop when the vacuum was running so we let it run sometimes. It only lasted a few months for the most part.
    “As soon as public service ceases to be the chief business of the citizens, and they would rather serve with their money than with their persons, the State is not far from its fall”
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
    Registered
    Sep 1999
    Location
    400 miles from Orlando
    Posts
    13,775
    If it's colic, you have no choice but to rock and walk; and beg baby to go to sleep. IF your pediatrician has ruled out other reasons. BTW, colic can last longer than the doc rec of 3 months; my kid screamed like a banshee for 4 months and slept maybe 6 hrs a day as a newborn. I should have seen that as a prediction,...I cried for weeks on end for him to sleep, to no avail. It was his internal clock.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Tide's avatar
    Registered
    Oct 2005
    Location
    The Gig City
    Posts
    2,656
    Quote Originally posted by TerraSapient View post
    We have 3 white noise machines. They are all fails. He likes the swing, but only for about an hour. He cries on and off all day, but from about 8pm to after midnight, he just cries and cries and cries and cries and cries... you get the point.


    After eliminating everything else under the sun, we are fairly sure he just is overly tired at night, but he will not sleep. He won't take a pacifier. There has to be something we can do. Definitely losing my mind right now.
    Feed him more or give him a little hit of the bottle at midnight if that keeps up - 2oz or so. Just a thought. And we believe in the "Baby Sleed Solution" book - you can find it pretty easy - worked with our two, they sleep like champs now at 21mo and 3.5 years.
    @GigCityPlanner

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Veloise's avatar
    Registered
    May 2004
    Location
    Grand Rapids, Michigan (Detroit ex-pat since 2004)
    Posts
    4,786
    Quote Originally posted by TerraSapient View post
    We have 3 white noise machines. They are all fails. He likes the swing, but only for about an hour. He cries on and off all day, but from about 8pm to after midnight, he just cries and cries and cries and cries and cries... you get the point.

    After eliminating everything else under the sun, we are fairly sure he just is overly tired at night, but he will not sleep. He won't take a pacifier. There has to be something we can do. Definitely losing my mind right now.
    Go for a drive in the car? With him, I mean.

    Trying to recall the name of the medication my mama used. Seriously, you slip him a mickey and he's out, everyone gets some rest. In the 1950s and early 60s, that was.

    Helpful hints

    Found it:
    Historical Perspective

    Not so long ago, in the middle part of this century, tranquilizers and sedatives were the "treatment of choice", routinely prescribed by doctors for Infant Colic. There is no doubt that such medicines worked quite well. They were abandoned in the 1960’s, however, when we began to appreciate that they had adverse long-term developmental consequences. The idea persists to this day, however, in some quarters. Not only do some older doctors persist in prescribing such medications (Paregoric, Phenobarbital, Bentyl) but some recent research has shown that small quantities of alcohol given to colicky babies result in a reduction in crying time. It should be noted, however, that alcohol is really in the same pharmacologic category as all of the tranquilizers previously used, and likely would have the same adverse developmental consequences.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian dandy_warhol's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2005
    Location
    meh.
    Posts
    8,339
    Quote Originally posted by TerraSapient View post
    We have 3 white noise machines. They are all fails. He likes the swing, but only for about an hour. He cries on and off all day, but from about 8pm to after midnight, he just cries and cries and cries and cries and cries... you get the point.


    After eliminating everything else under the sun, we are fairly sure he just is overly tired at night, but he will not sleep. He won't take a pacifier. There has to be something we can do. Definitely losing my mind right now.
    You might want to get him checked for acid reflux. My nephew had it from birth to almost two years. The only thing that helped was the boob and being held upright.
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian TerraSapient's avatar
    Registered
    Nov 2009
    Location
    The Glass City
    Posts
    2,610
    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess View post
    If it's colic, you have no choice but to rock and walk; and beg baby to go to sleep. IF your pediatrician has ruled out other reasons. BTW, colic can last longer than the doc rec of 3 months; my kid screamed like a banshee for 4 months and slept maybe 6 hrs a day as a newborn. I should have seen that as a prediction,...I cried for weeks on end for him to sleep, to no avail. It was his internal clock.
    This is it. He is "colicky" which is just an "expert's" way of saying, "your kid is going to scream all day everyday nonstop from 2 weeks old to between 3mo and 5mo and we have absolutely no idea why. Good luck".

    Old theories as to what instigates colic included: gas (now debunked), acid reflux (now debunked), and uncheery disposition (seems like the case).

    We have tried everything known to mankind and then some other random things. He will not stop crying. It is really frustrating to have friends with "normal" children say stupid things like, "maybe his diaper is wet". Yes, because after 6 hours of nonstop crying we didn't think of that.

    My normal day is basically like this:
    Wake up. Try not to cry while getting ready for work.
    Work all day.
    Come home, take baby and attempt to soothe him so MW can get a break.
    Pass baby back and forth between me and MW so he can eat.
    Do magical circus acts and attempt every baby soothing technique ever thought of.
    Enjoy 5-10 minutes of noncrying baby time.
    Attempt unsuccessfully to put baby to sleep for about 3-5 hours.
    Cry myself to sleep.
    Awake all night long to baby who cries every hour or so.
    Next day, repeat.

    Weekends are actually worse because then we have visitors who want to come around and see the baby, which just interrupts his few hours of good sleep he manages to get during the day, making him even fussier and more difficult to manage. They also say awesome things like, "he is so fussy, how do you make him stop crying?" and "have you tried feeding him more?". Most of these comments we just let roll off our backs, after all we don't have much energy left to deal with adult people after a schedule like this, but every so often someone says something so ridiculous that it takes every bit of self restraint I have left not to bite their heads off.

    After all the research I have read, and let me tell you, we have read just about everything, it appears that we just have to deal with it until he abruptly stops around 3 - 5 months of age. Allegedly we can enjoy motherhood from that point. In all honesty, if more babies were "colicky", we wouldn't have a population problem.
    Occupy Your Brain!

  11. #11
    OH....IO Hink's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hang on Sloopy...land
    Posts
    10,090
    Quote Originally posted by TerraSapient View post
    This is it. He is "colicky" which is just an "expert's" way of saying, "your kid is going to scream all day everyday nonstop from 2 weeks old to between 3mo and 5mo and we have absolutely no idea why. Good luck".

    Old theories as to what instigates colic included: gas (now debunked), acid reflux (now debunked), and uncheery disposition (seems like the case).

    We have tried everything known to mankind and then some other random things. He will not stop crying. It is really frustrating to have friends with "normal" children say stupid things like, "maybe his diaper is wet". Yes, because after 6 hours of nonstop crying we didn't think of that.

    My normal day is basically like this:
    Wake up. Try not to cry while getting ready for work.
    Work all day.
    Come home, take baby and attempt to soothe him so MW can get a break.
    Pass baby back and forth between me and MW so he can eat.
    Do magical circus acts and attempt every baby soothing technique ever thought of.
    Enjoy 5-10 minutes of noncrying baby time.
    Attempt unsuccessfully to put baby to sleep for about 3-5 hours.
    Cry myself to sleep.
    Awake all night long to baby who cries every hour or so.
    Next day, repeat.

    Weekends are actually worse because then we have visitors who want to come around and see the baby, which just interrupts his few hours of good sleep he manages to get during the day, making him even fussier and more difficult to manage. They also say awesome things like, "he is so fussy, how do you make him stop crying?" and "have you tried feeding him more?". Most of these comments we just let roll off our backs, after all we don't have much energy left to deal with adult people after a schedule like this, but every so often someone says something so ridiculous that it takes every bit of self restraint I have left not to bite their heads off.

    After all the research I have read, and let me tell you, we have read just about everything, it appears that we just have to deal with it until he abruptly stops around 3 - 5 months of age. Allegedly we can enjoy motherhood from that point. In all honesty, if more babies were "colicky", we wouldn't have a population problem.
    Our first was horribly colicky. He would cry from 8pm-2am every night. We ended up moving to shifts. My wife would sleep from 7pm to 2am and then I would sleep from 2am to 6am. I would then get up with the kid and let her sleep a couple more hours. That was for the first two weeks when I was home from work.

    Once I went back, we switched it around, so at 6am I would go to work. The colic behavior lasted for about a month. We did give him acid reducers though (my wife found studies that support this helping if not completely fixing). It won't last forever. I won't.

    Stay positive. This time will be a blur no matter what. I can't remember the first 3 months of my twins life.... no idea what happened then. I have pictures so I know it was real... but I got nothing.

    You can do it
    A common mistake people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools. -Douglas Adams

  12. #12
    Cyburbian TerraSapient's avatar
    Registered
    Nov 2009
    Location
    The Glass City
    Posts
    2,610
    Quote Originally posted by Hink View post


    Stay positive. This time will be a blur no matter what. I can't remember the first 3 months of my twins life.... no idea what happened then. I have pictures so I know it was real... but I got nothing.

    You can do it
    Thanks Hink. I needed that.
    It isn't always that bad, but sometimes.... wow! He has his days where I think he just likes to hear his own voice and enjoys crying.
    Unless you have had to deal with a colicky baby, I just don't think there is anyway to understand the level of stress and the feelings of helplessness that go along with trying to soothe a baby that has been crying for 6 straight hours. It is incomprehensible, even to those going through it.
    Occupy Your Brain!

  13. #13
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
    Registered
    May 2005
    Location
    Metro Detroit
    Posts
    6,420
    Quote Originally posted by TerraSapient View post
    Thanks Hink. I needed that.
    It isn't always that bad, but sometimes.... wow! He has his days where I think he just likes to hear his own voice and enjoys crying.
    Unless you have had to deal with a colicky baby, I just don't think there is anyway to understand the level of stress and the feelings of helplessness that go along with trying to soothe a baby that has been crying for 6 straight hours. It is incomprehensible, even to those going through it.
    I don't have any magic answers. We got lucky with our two daughters. They have always been good sleepers, from infants to today. The one thing we always tried to do was but them down for bed before they actually were tired. We always found that when they were over-tired they would fight sleep even more. Granted, if you have a colicky baby this probably won't matter.

    Feel free to bitch to us any time you want. Link Hink said, it will be hard for you to remember these days a few years from now. Sometimes I think I would trade a crying, cranky infant for my loud, mouthy, bratty 9-year old daughter.

    It's all relative TS. Don't feel like it's anything you're doing, and don't be afraid to tell the adult population to stay the hell away on the weekends.
    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany"

  14. #14
    My son was colicky AND he had 11 ear infections in his first year. Antibiotics helped with the ear infections but we learned later from his pediatric dentist that such frequent use of them caused a loss of enamel on his teeth. Permanently. I was not happy about that, but the horse was already out of the barn, so to say. Now I read where otocaine and Tylenol/Motrin might be a better option for newborns with ear infections over antibiotics.

    My daughter (the youngest) was not colicky but also had many ear infections.

    It does indeed get better and you become stronger parents for the experience.

    Off-topic:
    You also end up with a lot more gray hair, but that's a whole different thread.
    On pitching to Stan Musial:
    "Once he timed your fastball, your infielders were in jeopardy."
    Warren Spahn

  15. #15
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2004
    Location
    on my 15 minute break
    Posts
    18,169
    Hang in there TS. I was you seven years ago. Junior was collicky until he hit about four months. Time tends to diminish pain, but I recall thinking during that 15 week black hole of sleep deprived despair that I wasn't going to be able to hold on to my sanity. I did (well, relatively). The two most important things you can do is to make sure you and MW TAKE SHIFTS. You should figure out who works which shift, even to the point you write down the schedule on paper and post it on the refrigerator. The other thing - as much as humanly possible - is to sleep during those fleeting times when the baby sleeps - don't try to catch up on housework or prepare meals or deal with other repsonsibilities during these window. If you have any sort of support network now is the time to call in all favors from friends and family. Get their assistance in helping deal with some of the household responsibilities or even the baby. You can owe them later.

    I remember one morning as I was trundling off to work I noticed Mrs. Maister was sitting in the rocking chair with Junior crying and she was crying too. I asked her if there was anything I could do to help and she said (it was Monday) "I would like to take a shower on Wednedsay. I've written down a 15 minute time slot (on the 'schedule') for me to do that. Please make certain you can deal with him then." We tried EVERYTHING and nothing seemed to help. At one point a pediatrician suggested it might be a formula sensitivity and recommended some type of formula that cost about 6 times as much as the usual formula - I remember thinking I would have gladly paid my entire salary if it would just stop Junior from crying.

    It will stop in a few weeks. Maybe not as soon as you want, but it will stop. Honest.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  16. #16
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2005
    Location
    in a meeting
    Posts
    8,613
    Oh TS - I am so sorry

    My remedies I did with my kids with colick:
    • lay baby on belly and give an oil massage in a darkened room - olive oil works great - baby oil is too strong a scent imho for a little baby to take on
    • baby pepto bismol - it's pink I remember but I can't remember what they call it - mylicon?
    • hand off the baby to a neighbor - no really, I was lucky when I had my kids to have other Moms in the neighborhood - let them hold the baby while you take a walk/run/bike for an hour (yes, an hour) - another set of arms often helps the situation and at least you will get a break - and really, as a Mom, holding another person's crying baby doesn't freak us out
    • put the baby in the crib, close the door, leave the room and set the timer for 20 minutes and come back in when the timer rings - as my Mom says, if they're crying, they're breathing and sometimes they need to sort out whatever is ailing them without you around - 20 minutes will not send them to therapy when they are 25 (but just in case, we always put a quarter in the therapy fund jar when we did this)

    and it's okay to cry too

  17. #17
    Cyburbian Planit's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In a 480 square foot ex baseball nacho stand
    Posts
    7,319
    TS & MW - my heart goes out to you & welcome to the world of kids...

    Seriously, lp has the answer, it's mylicon. We called it Magic Drops. Our daughter was colicky from 6 - 8 every night, you could almost time it. We started using the mylicon and it worked. Fussing and crying started getting less and less. It was a relief.

    Our best friends daughter was much more colicky than ours. Her daddy used to sit on the front porch and just rock her in his lap outside. The traffic (white noise) and the cool air helped her (in combination with the mylicon).

    Everyone who we give a baby shower gift to receives a bottle of "Magic Drops" mylicon for their baby & their sanity. Good luck.
    "Whatever beer I'm drinking, is better than the one I'm not." DMLW
    "Budweiser sells a product they reflectively insist on calling beer." John Oliver

  18. #18
    Cyburbian TerraSapient's avatar
    Registered
    Nov 2009
    Location
    The Glass City
    Posts
    2,610
    Thanks. You guys are the best! I needed some encouragement today.
    I will definitely try a few of these suggestions tonight and see if little screecher lets up at all.
    Occupy Your Brain!

  19. #19
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
    Registered
    Sep 1999
    Location
    400 miles from Orlando
    Posts
    13,775
    Quote Originally posted by TerraSapient View post
    Weekends are actually worse because then we have visitors who want to come around and see the baby, which just interrupts his few hours of good sleep he manages to get during the day, making him even fussier and more difficult to manage. They also say awesome things like, "he is so fussy, how do you make him stop crying?" and "have you tried feeding him more?". Most of these comments we just let roll off our backs, after all we don't have much energy left to deal with adult people after a schedule like this, but every so often someone says something so ridiculous that it takes every bit of self restraint I have left not to bite their heads off.
    .
    For your own sanity, maybe you need to explain to people that you cannot have visitors on weekends until the colic is over. Unless, of course, they'd like to babysit for awhile so you can lock yourself in your room with earplugs, a sound machine, and a dose of a sleep aid, and get some rest.

    My son's colic was so bad that at 3 weeks, I drove two hours to my parents' house, handed him to my mom, and slept for two days. (His father was completely useless)

    p.s. I set up the video camera and got a good long video of the kid's colic and me trying to deal with it. Just in case he ever has a kid with colic...

  20. #20
    Cyburbian TerraSapient's avatar
    Registered
    Nov 2009
    Location
    The Glass City
    Posts
    2,610
    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess View post
    For your own sanity, maybe you need to explain to people that you cannot have visitors on weekends until the colic is over. Unless, of course, they'd like to babysit for awhile so you can lock yourself in your room with earplugs, a sound machine, and a dose of a sleep aid, and get some rest.
    I have already been pushing for this. Now to get MW on board. She wants to let the grandparents visit whenever they want, which I understand, but sometimes I just want everyone to leave us alone. From now on, they can visit all they want, but they are going to be put to work as soon as they arrive.

    Grandparent to do list:
    vacuum
    dishes
    cat liter
    walk dogs
    soothe crying baby so we can nap
    mow lawn

    Thanks for visiting! come again!
    Occupy Your Brain!

  21. #21
    Cyburbian terraplnr's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2005
    Location
    American Riviera
    Posts
    1,064
    A good friend’s baby boy was very colicky and she removed allergens from her diet (wheat and dairy) and tried all the gas remedies, but nothing really worked, she just had to wait it out. Apparently I was a colicky baby and a few times when my mom was at her wit’s end she would do the “put me in the crib and take a shower” thing because as long as she could hear me wailing she knew I was alright. From what I’ve read and heard once you’ve tried all the basics then it’s just a waiting game. Hang in there and each day that passes is a minor victory and one day closer to it being over! Once he’s 4+ months and smiley and happy then it’ll all be a distant bad dream.

  22. #22
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Down by Dun Ringill
    Posts
    6,043
    Blog entries
    6
    Terra Sapient,

    You are getting a lot of good advice. Babies, being human, are all different, so you may have to try everything that has been suggested and a few more you think of. And by the time you've tried everything, the baby may just grow out of it.

    Our son was not troublesome as a baby (as an 11 year old, well, that is a different story!!! ). He basically ate, slept and pooped. With colic, finding the way to burp the baby that works is a help. Some babies burp best by putting them on your shoulder and gently patting,so they can ruin your shirt, while others respond better to the method of putting them on your leg and patting them, so they can ruin your pants and the sofa cushion. Either way, fabric will get spoiled, but the baby might be less fussy.

    On the occasions that he was fussy, my solution was reciting "The Finn Who Wouldn't Take a Sauna," by Garrison Keillor. Why it worked - I think it was because there was a soothing cadence and it goes for about five minutes, which was about how long it took to get him to sleep.

    My only other suggestion is to muster your best attitude and present a comforting front (even if you are going nuts). If the baby senses you are at the end of your rope, then the baby may become more upset. If you at least seem calm and comforting, then the baby may feel more comforted and at ease.

    And don't worry about spoiling the little tyke. Our baby wasn't spoiled. He just smelled that way.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  23. #23
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
    Registered
    May 2005
    Location
    New Town
    Posts
    3,872
    Oh boy, THAT sounds familiar! Our first born seemed very unhappy to be here. I remember it starting very early on with the inconsolable crying and, like you all, the only real advice I got was “things really change around 3 months…” 3 MONTHS?! I didn’t think I would make it and there were many nights where I held my son up, looked him in the eye and proclaimed “I don’t know what you want!”

    Eventually, it subsided and I don’t have any explanation for it beyond time. We were hyper conscious of things like what my wife was eating, rhythms of sleep and wake, some horrible physical condition that made his insides feel like they were on fire. Never did get any clear sense of what was causing the discomfort, but as I said, it eventually went away. Still, we were a nervous wreck for those first three months.

    As for whether its an indication of an unhappy disposition, I’ll just say that, now 12, our son is a very happy and contented fellow. Not always. And he does tend to be an emotional kid when stressed or hungry, but overall, he’s become very even keeled.

    Our daughter was a very happy go lucky kid and gave us very little trouble in those early months. But now, at 7, she is quite the handful. So, you take your licks up front, or when they are older. You're just doing your time early…

    It all balances out in the end. But right now, try to have a good sense of humor about it all. Because, believe it or not, it will go by in an instant and you will be pining for those days when all your concerns boiled down to eating, sleeping and changing diapers. Again, sense of humor!! Its absurd and ridiculous and they try your patience to no end, knowing that they are so dang cute, they can get away with it (which they can, because they are!). But for those parents who fall off the edge, this is how babies get shaken! Definitely don’t do that (not that you would…)

    A few things to try: warm baths with a little lavender oil, belly rubs (I think you are supposed to do it clockwise to encourage digestion), and sleeping when you can!! The dishes can wait, your nerves can’t. This is really hard for parents who want to “get things done” when the child is asleep. But, in my opinion, your state of mind is more important than clean dishes. Sleep.
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  24. #24
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
    Registered
    May 2005
    Location
    Metro Detroit
    Posts
    6,420
    I wonder if there are colicky adults?
    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany"

  25. #25
    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Land of Confusion
    Posts
    3,740
    My sister is currently going through this with her baby boy (1 month old). She is also crying a lot and seems pretty exasperated. I wish I had some helpful advice for you TS, but all I can offer is 'hang in there', things will get better..

+ Reply to thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 18
    Last post: 31 Oct 2012, 10:51 AM
  2. [OMG!] Puppies, kitties or babies?
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 19
    Last post: 28 Jan 2010, 5:04 PM
  3. Lack of babies in San Francisco
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 45
    Last post: 01 Jun 2005, 3:42 AM