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Thread: Colicky babies

  1. #26
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    RT was a colicky baby. My mom and I used to take turns eating dinner so we could walk and bounce her until she passed out for the evening. The daytime wasn't quite as bad but the 6-11pm run was brutal. My heart goes out to you and MonkeyWife.

    Some things that helped a little:

    Mylicon drops-it's simethicone and inert so it's not absorbed but it breaks down gas bubbles in the digestive tract
    Switching from milk based to soy based formula-if MW is breastfeeding try an elimination diet, www.kellymom.com is the best BF website EVER for anything related to BF.
    Try putting SeaMonkey to sleep on his tummy. I know all this "back to sleep" business but something about tummy sleeping made RT happier.
    Take time for yourself. And MW take time for herself. That might mean shifts for a while but it helps.
    Temporary ban on weekend visitors. Schedule visits, some people might be a little put out about it but they aren't the ones dealing with SeaMonkey hour after hour either.
    Things will get better. I promise.

    Thankfully Arabella has been a lot easier than her big sister.
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  2. #27
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Cow Lick Baby!
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  3. #28
    Cyburbian TerraSapient's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by btrage View post
    I wonder if there are colicky adults?
    Right now I feel like a colicky adult. I don't think the world would be as understanding and compassionate to me as I am to my baby if I cried all day though.

    Quote Originally posted by kjel View post
    RT was a colicky baby.
    Try putting SeaMonkey to sleep on his tummy. I know all this "back to sleep" business but something about tummy sleeping made RT happier.
    We have already made the switch to the belly. It doesn't help a ton, but what little sleep he does give in to he gets on his belly. Sleeping on the back = waking up every 30-40mins guaranteed. At least while he is on his belly, we have a chance that he will go for 2-3 hours. I know tummy sleep allegedly gives a greater risk of SIDS but it definitely reduces the risk that we will snap and go stark raving mad.
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  4. #29
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    Are the week-end visitors responsible people? If so, let them in to see the baby, then beat feet to the beach for a few hours!
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  5. #30
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Mastiff View post
    Are the week-end visitors responsible people? If so, let them in to see the baby, then beat feet to the beach for a few hours!
    my thought exactly - if they come, they have to be part of the solution, not part of the problem -

  6. #31
    Cyburbian terraplnr's avatar
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    I’m just curious, have you tried a really tight swaddle? My son would wake up on his back after half an hour unless we swaddled him like a sausage. I recall the “Happiest Baby on the Block” guy saying that most parents are afraid to tightly swaddle (definitely me at first) but when I did a really tight one, it calmed him down a lot. But, he just had the general newborn fussiness, so it might not help. Just curious. Hang in there!!!

  7. #32
    Cyburbian TerraSapient's avatar
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    I wrap a pretty decent swaddle I must say. The "5 Ss" really do help calm him down. The problem with them is that they just temporarily postpone the screaming. Even if I swaddle him, shussshhh him, sway him, lay him on his side/belly for an hour, within a minute or two of my stopping he just starts right back up. It does buy us a little bit of quiet sometimes though.

    Edit: I must note that what actually works better than regular swaddling with his temperment is wearing him. Our Moby wrap has been the only tool that we can nearly always rely on. We just wrap him up around us, like a swaddle that is attached to us, bounce with him, walk him in the yard, and after about 30-45 mins he calms down and goes to sleep. Not sure if sleeping sitting up wrapped on us is the best napping position, but he is still breathing and he is getting some much needed rest, so I say screw it.

    Edit2: We decided to start bottle feeding tonight -- a few days ahead of schedule, but MW needed a break and I needed some bonding time. MW is breastfeeding but has been pumping so that we could supplement his feeding with bottles when she wants a beer or a break. Well tonight I was able to feed my son for the very first time. What a joy! It was awesome. It was also the first completely positive moment I have had with him in a few days. Much needed.
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  8. #33
    NIMBY asshatterer Plus Richmond Jake's avatar
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    I was fortunate. My two sons did not suffer from the colic.

    Notwithstanding, this shall pass.




    RJ runs and hides.
    I think that one of the great signs of security is the ability to just walk away.

  9. #34
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by TerraSapient View post
    I wrap a pretty decent swaddle I must say. The "5 Ss" really do help calm him down. The problem with them is that they just temporarily postpone the screaming. Even if I swaddle him, shussshhh him, sway him, lay him on his side/belly for an hour, within a minute or two of my stopping he just starts right back up. It does buy us a little bit of quiet sometimes though.

    Edit: I must note that what actually works better than regular swaddling with his temperment is wearing him. Our Moby wrap has been the only tool that we can nearly always rely on. We just wrap him up around us, like a swaddle that is attached to us, bounce with him, walk him in the yard, and after about 30-45 mins he calms down and goes to sleep. Not sure if sleeping sitting up wrapped on us is the best napping position, but he is still breathing and he is getting some much needed rest, so I say screw it.

    Edit2: We decided to start bottle feeding tonight -- a few days ahead of schedule, but MW needed a break and I needed some bonding time. MW is breastfeeding but has been pumping so that we could supplement his feeding with bottles when she wants a beer or a break. Well tonight I was able to feed my son for the very first time. What a joy! It was awesome. It was also the first completely positive moment I have had with him in a few days. Much needed.
    Do what works for you, MW, and SeaMonkey and don't be the least bit apologetic about it. Seriously. Parenting is a lot of trial and error, lots of error. You'll figure each other out though, I promise

    Good for you an MW on the bottle feeding. Everyone needs a break and you need some positive interaction with SeaMonkey too. Since MW is bf'ing, do check out kellymom.com for super awesome advice for every situation imaginable.
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  10. #35
    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by dandy_warhol View post
    You might want to get him checked for acid reflux. My nephew had it from birth to almost two years. The only thing that helped was the boob and being held upright.
    This is a great suggestion. My daughter was colicky and we finally had it. We tried everything. Milk, car rides, swaddle, etc. Went back to the doc and suggested a new formula since the boob juice has prematurely ran dry. Sure enough, it worked. To each their own, and remember, hang in there. It gets better and better than you hit that stride, than the next thing you know, your at the terrible twos
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  11. #36
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by TerraSapient View post
    Edit2: We decided to start bottle feeding tonight -- a few days ahead of schedule, but MW needed a break and I needed some bonding time. MW is breastfeeding but has been pumping so that we could supplement his feeding with bottles when she wants a beer or a break. Well tonight I was able to feed my son for the very first time. What a joy! It was awesome. It was also the first completely positive moment I have had with him in a few days. Much needed.
    Now that I think about it, with our first daughter we switched to bottle-feeding much earlier than what was planned. However, I do recall her becoming a much happier baby after we did this. We theorized that she just wasn't getting enough of the breast milk for whatever she needed it for.
    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany"

  12. #37
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by btrage View post
    Now that I think about it, with our first daughter we switched to bottle-feeding much earlier than what was planned. However, I do recall her becoming a much happier baby after we did this. We theorized that she just wasn't getting enough of the breast milk for whatever she needed it for.
    Making poo
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  13. #38
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by TerraSapient View post
    Edit: I must note that what actually works better than regular swaddling with his temperment is wearing him. Our Moby wrap has been the only tool that we can nearly always rely on. We just wrap him up around us, like a swaddle that is attached to us, bounce with him, walk him in the yard, and after about 30-45 mins he calms down and goes to sleep. Not sure if sleeping sitting up wrapped on us is the best napping position, but he is still breathing and he is getting some much needed rest, so I say screw it.
    Our fussy child really wanted to be held and carried almost all the time as well. It was exhausting but I think better overall for his emotional development. We used a Bjorn (or however its spelled) and put him facing out which he loved. But reading all of this reminded me of the inevitable napping ritual that plagued those early months. One of us would either walk around bouncing him or sit rocking him to sleep, make sure he was in deep slumber, and then attempt to lower him into his crib. About 6 inches from the mattress he would always wake up in a panic. So, back to the pacing and bouncing and rocking and quietly crying to oneself about the sweet sweet elixir of sleep...

    Dr. Sears and his pantheon of baby books were always our go-to resource for all things babies. He promotes "attachment parenting" and I think your observations fit in with that. If he is wanting to be in contact with you, he is telling you something important, so good to listen. There is also lots of evidence that babies that spend a lot of time in physical contact with their parents as babies are more confident and exploratory later on. They have that confidence behind them, resulting from so many hours of contact, that the parents really "have their back" as it were.

    Good luck. Don't forget to laugh. Seriously...
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  14. #39
    Cyburbian ursus's avatar
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    I'm going to ditto the advice and add two things I didn't see that are simple and made a difference with my first daughter who was super-colicky:

    1. Rocking Chair. (you've already got an hour from the swing, right?) I would not live in a house with babies without a rocking chair I legitimately liked to spend time in because you're going to be in that chair rocking that baby if you like peace. I'm a fan of rocking chairs.

    2. Binkys. You mentioned he didn't like to take a pacifier. Try all kinds of them, not just the ones the baby magazines say are the best. I mean literally try. them. all. Every kid is different and I had some who wouldn't touch a certain kind but loved others and a binky might just save everybody. I also say let them suck that binky as long as they want to no matter what the dumb-a** magazines say, too.

    I wish I lived on your street and could take your colicky boy for you for a while, TS. I really wish I did.
    "...I would never try to tick Hink off. He kinda intimidates me. He's quite butch, you know." - Maister

  15. #40
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by TerraSapient View post
    Edit: I must note that what actually works better than regular swaddling with his temperment is wearing him. Our Moby wrap has been the only tool that we can nearly always rely on. We just wrap him up around us, like a swaddle that is attached to us, bounce with him, walk him in the yard, and after about 30-45 mins he calms down and goes to sleep. Not sure if sleeping sitting up wrapped on us is the best napping position, but he is still breathing and he is getting some much needed rest, so I say screw it.
    Our fussy child really wanted to be held and carried almost all the time as well. It was exhausting but I think better overall for his emotional development. We used a Bjorn (or however its spelled) and put him facing out which he loved. But reading all of this reminded me of the inevitable napping ritual that plagued those early months. One of us would either walk around bouncing him or sit rocking him to sleep, make sure he was in deep slumber, and then attempt to lower him into his crib. About 6 inches from the mattress he would always wake up in a panic. So, back to the pacing and bouncing and rocking and quietly crying to oneself about the sweet sweet elixir of sleep...

    Dr. Sears and his pantheon of baby books were always our go-to resource for all things babies. He promotes "attachment parenting" and I think your observations fit in with that. If he is wanting to be in contact with you, he is telling you something important, so good to listen. There is also lots of evidence that babies that spend a lot of time in physical contact with their parents as babies are more confident and exploratory later on. They have that confidence behind them, resulting from so many hours of contact, that the parents really "have their back" as it were.

    Good luck. Don't forget to laugh. Seriously...
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  16. #41
    Cyburbian TerraSapient's avatar
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    We have tried 3 binkies so far, so we probably have a long way to go. I will definitely keep trying though because I want that kid's mouth full of something.

    I really enjoy wearing him in the moby. I get great photos of him, as you can see.



    kjel I forgot to mention that MW has found that site useful! Thanks!
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  17. #42
    Cyburbian ursus's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by TerraSapient View post
    We have tried 3 binkies so far, so we probably have a long way to go. I will definitely keep trying though because I want that kid's mouth full of something.

    I really enjoy wearing him in the moby. I get great photos of him, as you can see.



    kjel I forgot to mention that MW has found that site useful! Thanks!
    This is priceless!
    "...I would never try to tick Hink off. He kinda intimidates me. He's quite butch, you know." - Maister

  18. #43
    Cyburbian TerraSapient's avatar
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    The Doc seems to think it isn't "colic" (which she refers to as babies who have a hard time coping with the world) and that SeaMonkey has acid reflux.

    I'm not sure what to make of this since I have read a ton about how acid reflux is the new "its just gas" diagnosis and that even babies treated for reflux show little change in amount of time screaming. Nonetheless, Doc doesn't want to try drugs first and has a list of other remedies she would like us to try first, including sleeping on a 30 degree incline at night, and sleeping sitting up in the moby during the day whenever practical. I'm okay with this. Try it we shall.
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  19. #44
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by TerraSapient View post
    ... she would like us to try first, including sleeping on a 30 degree incline at night, and sleeping sitting up in the moby during the day whenever practical. I'm okay with this. Try it we shall.
    And trying is all you can do. I too have heard acid reflux is becoming the new 'it's just gas'
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  20. #45
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    I would personally shy away from any medications for a child of this age, even if it is, indeed, acid reflux (instead of "acid reflux" wink, wink). Hang in there! SeaMonkey is still young and bodies change quickly, so I'm still holding out hope it will resolve itself with time. But you probably won't notice - it will be replaced by another thing to fret about. Its what we parents do (and is a good thing - vigilance - and sometimes there really is something that needs professional attention so I'm not poking fun). Do either of you check to make sure he's still breathing? Like a few times a day? I know I did. For both kids...

    I was also recently recalling that our son LOVED his pacifier (we were all talking about it last night and even he, at 12, still has memories of it) It was even "an issue" for a while and something we had initially decided against. But that kid REALLY wanted to suck on something, so we caved. And he's more than fine now. Our daughter, by contrast, was not interested. Anyway, another trick to try.
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  21. #46
    Cyburbian dandy_warhol's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by dandy_warhol View post
    You might want to get him checked for acid reflux. My nephew had it from birth to almost two years. The only thing that helped was the boob and being held upright.
    My nephew had acid reflux. Gas affected him differently, in fact the poor little guy could never burp - still can't but he can toot like a champ! My sister had to restrict her diet and eliminate certain foods while nursing which did seem to help nephew's tummy. He was put on baby priolosec and special drops - maybe what was previously mentioned. Through my sister's research she found that breastfeeding (not just breast milk) was best for his situation.

    Good luck.
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

  22. #47
    Cyburbian TerraSapient's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by dandy_warhol View post
    My nephew had acid reflux. Gas affected him differently, in fact the poor little guy could never burp - still can't but he can toot like a champ! My sister had to restrict her diet and eliminate certain foods while nursing which did seem to help nephew's tummy. He was put on baby priolosec and special drops - maybe what was previously mentioned. Through my sister's research she found that breastfeeding (not just breast milk) was best for his situation.

    Good luck.
    Our Doc said acid reflux is fairly common and most babies out grow it by six months. Sorry to hear your little nephew had such a rough patch of it!

    MW is cutting out dairy starting tomorrow. I have decided to be supportive in this endeavor and join her. Goodbye sweet delicious cheese. Creamy, tart yogurt. Goodbye my loves. Well... for the next few months anyway.
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  23. #48
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    TS,
    How's the colic going? My daughter (now 3) had extremely bad "acid reflux" for the first 7 months of her life. She was miserable and so were her mother and I. As others have said; hang in there, it does get better. Our pediatrician sent us to a gastric specialist who put her on some very expensive and stinky prescription formula which seemed to help for about a week. We used gripe water with some degree of relief so if you haven't tried it you may want to. I really feel for you as I know all to well what you're experiencing, best of luck.

  24. #49
    Cyburbian TerraSapient's avatar
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    Thanks Shell. Gripe Water has been the only thing that seems to help right now, though we haven't tried any other medicinal remedies really. Hopefully the little dude finds some relief from sleeping more upright and smaller meals. It sucks watching him wiggle around now, knowing he is in pain. Poor little monkey.
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  25. #50
    Cyburbian TerraSapient's avatar
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    Another month goes by and no improvement. It has been two hours since he started crying this evening.

    64 days old. MW and I could really use a solid night's sleep.

    Allegedly they grow out of this between 3 months and 1 year.

    Though the crying isn't getting better, our tolerance of it has grown. On the bright side, I haven't cried myself to sleep in at least a month.


    Edit: I am so envious of my friends who have babies right now that don't cry like this. I will pay this child back for this when he is 16 and wants to sleep in on the weekends.
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