Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: European programs: Erasmus Mundus

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Chandlerville, IL
    Posts
    6

    European programs: Erasmus Mundus

    I have a keen interest in studying European planning, and after stumbling about the internet, came across the Erasmus Mundus program administered by the EU. They offer two programs for planners: Planet Europe http://www.planet-europe.eu/home.html and 4cities http://www.4cities.eu/ (the latter seems to be much more loosely "planning" though). Planet Europe graduates students with a joint or "double" M.S.c degree (you attend three different universities and get a degree from two). However, 4cities is less clear on the type of degree offered. All I've been able to find is that it is indeed a Masters degree (whether it is a M.S.c and/or a joint degree remains elusive to me).

    They are both new programs it seems, under five years. I was wondering if ..... a. anyone had experience with either program or had any impressions upon reviewing their websites and b. potentially working in the US with degrees from Europe (I know there are several threads already dedicated to global transfer-ability of degrees, but I was hoping to get some fresh opinions (: ).

    Thanks much everyone!

  2. #2
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Across the pond
    Posts
    149

    My thoughts

    As an American currently living in Europe here are my 2c.
    1) The US won't understand your program/ area of study.
    2) It can be harder to get AICP certification.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Mar 2008
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    57
    I'm an American working in Europe as well (with a Master's in Urban Planning from a UK University). Although I haven't made the transition back to the US, I've heard others having trouble breaking into the 'planning market' with a European degree. In a good economy I think the experience in Europe would be looked at very well. Nice range of experience always boast well. However the problem that we're in now is competition is so high. If you apply for a planning job in California for example, they'll certainly want you to have some knowledge of local planning, and will probably take someone with a (prestigious) local institution rather than a (prestigious) European institution.

    All that said take my advice with a grain of salt. As I said early I haven't made the transition back to the US, but that's my quick observations. Regardless the options you presented sound promising and I don't think you'll regret it at all. Just weigh out your options carefully. Hope this helps.

  4. #4
    Member
    Registered
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Ithaca, NY
    Posts
    2

    Erasmus Mundus

    Erasmus Mundus programs are well worth the time. In my experience, the students who participate in this program are sharp, engaging, and provide unique perspectives. I suggest you make a list of positives and negatives and review your final line. I can begin the list of positives for you: extremely low tuition fees (with high probability of full-funding), low cost of living (in relation to most places in the U.S.), varying perpectives, an opportunity to study the American city (if you so wish) outside of the American city, and, of course, the many positives that come along with being in beautiful cities, like Vienna (schnitzel, kleiner brauners auf der Ringstrasse, biking everywhere, walking everywhere, etc.). The cons: opportunity cost.

    If you have an American undergraduate degree, I find it hard to believe that your application to a planning position will be discounted for having a European graduate degree in planning. Come the application/interview phase, you will be assessed based on your experiences (both internship and academic exercises). I recommend you look at the programs and determine what practical applications you will be able to partake in (be it case study creation, workshops, etc.) that will help you apply the theory acquired. Speaking to your experiences about efforts to revitalize corridors in Turin during an interview will not have deleterious consequences. There are many cases where people without planning degrees get planning jobs. If your question was about going to Europe to study law with a desire to practice in the U.S., my reply would be very different. Instead, you've selected to embark upon a profession that can be positively impacted by the diverse perspectives of critical thinkers. All that being said, there are also many pros to studying in American schools. At the end of the day, it's a matter of how you wish to assemble your life experiences so that it can help shape your future decisions.

  5. #5
    Member
    Registered
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Chandlerville, IL
    Posts
    6
    Great advice! Thanks! Anyone else have their two cents to throw in?

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 13
    Last post: 25 Sep 2013, 10:54 AM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last post: 10 Apr 2011, 1:30 PM
  3. European Films
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 4
    Last post: 26 Apr 2010, 11:26 AM
  4. The new European microcar
    Transportation Planning
    Replies: 10
    Last post: 13 Sep 2005, 4:17 PM
  5. European
    Introduce Yourself
    Replies: 31
    Last post: 12 Oct 2004, 7:10 PM