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Thread: The 2013 Garden thread

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    The 2013 Garden thread



    It's January and there's snow on the ground, a perfect time to dream about what you want to plant/grow this year in your garden. The disastrous 2012 growing season is now behind us. Let's share our plans!
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    I will once again attempt to grow ground cherries this year. If I can get the seeds, I will grow paprika peppers.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

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    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    I'm growing more acorn squash, fewer tomatoes, and a different Charentais melon this year. Dropping the bell peppers for cubanelles, and taking the tomatillo out of the container and into the actual garden.

    I'm also getting a couple lengths of conduit to put up some shade cloth to cut some heat, as I suspect we'll be too hot again this year.
    -------
    Give a man a gun, and he can rob a bank. Give a man a bank, and he can rob the world.

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    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    We are going to be all over the place this year in terms of gardens. The area that I had my garden last year now has three climbing roses and a wisteria vine. It will also have beans, squash, cucumber, and even a few tomato plants tied up to a trellis fence that I am installing soon.

    I also plan building 2 small (2-foot by 2-foot) raised vegetable beds close to the house for salad greens and root plants that will be in a partly sunny area of the yard. Finally, we are planning on using pots for hot weather plants like peppers.

    We will also be rebuilding our back porch, but when we get done, we will install a trellis and plant a grape vine (eating not wine) along the side of it and herbs & edible flowers at the base.
    Over the next few years we will be doing more experimenting with combining decorative landscape and garden vegetables into the same beds. Additionally, I would love to start experimenting with espalier fruit trees since I don’t have a large area.

    *yes, I do have a full 10 year landscape design plan for my house.
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  5. #5
    Cyburbian fringe's avatar
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    Mustard, chard, and beets in a cattle watering trough converted to cold frame.

    Greens medley is great sauteed.

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Probably around St Patricks Day I'm going to set up my small greenhouse again this year and get started on a few spring vegetables. The greenhouse was the one big success story for last year's otherwise near-disastrous garden season. The plants I started in the greenhouse were ready for harvest a full two weeks sooner than the seeds that were started without the greenhouse.
    Starting in the greenhouse this year definitely sugar snap peas and spinach. I think I'll try growing leeks as well for the first time too.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Cyburbian ursus's avatar
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    I'm a bad gardener, but I'm going to try again this year. Tomatoes, green peppers, squash and pumpkins. The typical "you've-got-to-be-a-moron-if-you-can't-even-grow-this-stuff" garden of suburbia. But I'm going to kick butt this year, I can feel it. I might even build a scarecrow and dress it up like Joan Rivers, just because.

    Serious question, how hard are peas to grow? I've not ever tried but think if I added one "less standard" thing it would be peas. Advice?
    "...I would never try to tick Hink off. He kinda intimidates me. He's quite butch, you know." - Maister

  8. #8
    2 years ago I did Fava beans and they actually worked pretty well in Wisconsin. Might do those again. Also have 4 hop plants I put in last year that should go nuts this year. I also usually do some chard, kale, greens, and beets, and of course a ton of hot peppers and tomatoes.
    "I'm a white male, age 18 to 49. Everyone listens to me, no matter how dumb my suggestions are."

    - Homer Simpson

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ursus View post
    I'm a bad gardener, but I'm going to try again this year. Tomatoes, green peppers, squash and pumpkins. The typical "you've-got-to-be-a-moron-if-you-can't-even-grow-this-stuff" garden of suburbia. But I'm going to kick butt this year, I can feel it. I might even build a scarecrow and dress it up like Joan Rivers, just because.

    Serious question, how hard are peas to grow? I've not ever tried but think if I added one "less standard" thing it would be peas. Advice?
    Peas are supposed to like to climb so you may want to place a net or other support for them to grow up
    Peas are easy to grow - plant them kinda deep (1" - 1.5") as soon as the ground can be worked. They grow best in cool weather. Apart from watering and weeding there's really nothing to 'em because they're usually pest & disease free! pods come online in the early summer and youre usually done with your harvests early-mid July. I recommend sugar snap peas because you got a lot more food due to the sweet and edible pods/shells.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Cyburbian ursus's avatar
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    Thanks! I'm going to try the peas. Beautiful plants, too.
    "...I would never try to tick Hink off. He kinda intimidates me. He's quite butch, you know." - Maister

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Cardinal View post
    I will once again attempt to grow ground cherries this year. If I can get the seeds, I will grow paprika peppers.
    Did you locate any paprika peppers? I'd be willing to pay to get them from a seed catalogue if I knew i had a reputable source (and not one of those shady - or should I say 'seedy' - outfits that sell seeds out of the back of a van...."psst, hey Bub, you wanna buy some pepper seeds? They're genuine Hungarian you know...")

    Quote Originally posted by Repo Man
    2 years ago I did Fava beans and they actually worked pretty well in Wisconsin. Might do those again....
    Please tell me you served them with a nice chianti....
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    Did you locate any paprika peppers? I'd be willing to pay to get them from a seed catalogue if I knew i had a reputable source (and not one of those shady - or should I say 'seedy' - outfits that sell seeds out of the back of a van...."psst, hey Bub, you wanna buy some pepper seeds? They're genuine Hungarian you know...")....
    I don't see them anywhere. I am also not finding ground cherry this year.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

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    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Here's a link to a companion planting poster.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ofos View post
    Here's a link to a companion planting poster.
    That's kinda cool. I like visual guides like that one.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Yesterday there was very little snow left on the ground and I endeavored to hoe another raised bed and wanted to erect the mini-greenhouse. Alas, the soil was still partly frozen. I intend to get as early of a start as possible on the spring vegetables this year, but the prolonged cold weather (we really haven't experienced very long of a stretch this year with above freezing temps) has delayed my enthusiastic impulses thus far. Just checked the 10 day forcast and it looks like we are on track for 40+ degree temps the next week and a half. I think we may at last be out of the woods with regard to winter (although there's always the chance of a freak snow in April to screw things up).

    This weekend for sure I will get things underway with at least one plot!
    Last edited by Maister; 26 Mar 2013 at 10:46 AM.

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    Over the last couple weekends I managed to get the two large raised beds prepared - worked the soil and covered them with paper mulch and set up a twine grid to mark out 12" squares. I sowed 62 sugar snap peas and 144 spinach. The spinach seeds were a few years old and I'm hoping for 70 - 80% germination. The peas were brand new. Tonight I will sow the lettuce and plan to start 12 of them.

    The big garden excitement this weekend, though, was the almost 70 degree temps AND.....several stalks of asparagus emerged!!! Based on the weather reports, it looks like we should be getting our first harvest probably by Friday. That, my friends, is satisfying.

    Bunnies munched on five of the six small blueberry plants this winter, it looks like possible one of the damaged plants may be saved but I may have to replant and put up better defenses this year.

    A word about spinach: 'savoy' in connection with plant types, is a term that means really crinkly leaves. While it looks nice, I find it is a pain in the arse when it comes to washing the plants off. It's easy to miss some crusted dirt or insect that has lodged itself in the folds....my advice is to avoid savoy types of spinach and go with a smooth variety instead. Correnta is a nice tasty choice, having smooth easy to clean leaves, and is fairly bolt resistant too.

    Anyone have recommendations for a super tender type of bush green bean? I intend to can alot of beans this year and I'm looking for the tenderest I can find.
    Last edited by Maister; 29 Apr 2013 at 9:02 AM.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  17. #17
    Cyburbian Plus dandy_warhol's avatar
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    Good luck with the asparagus, Maister. It is one of my favorite veggies!


    I went out investigating sedum on Saturday. I have a number of varieties in various garden beds but I'm interested in doing one of those vertical planters you may have seen.
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

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    Cyburbian Plus Salmissra's avatar
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    Despite my best intentions, and my genetics, I am an indifferent gardener. So far all I've been able to grow with consistent success are shrubs and certain flowers.

    Can keep alive if purchased already growing: hanging potted plants, indoor ivy, and some ornamental cacti.

    Will kill despite best efforts: started from seed potted plants, vegetables (I think it's the ground prep, not the plants), and low blooming plants.

    Have not tried in current house: roses of any kind, climbing vines of any kind, and fruit.
    "We do not need any other Tutankhamun's tomb with all its treasures. We need context. We need understanding. We need knowledge of historical events to tie them together. We don't know much. Of course we know a lot, but it is context that's missing, not treasures." - Werner Herzog, in Archaeology, March/April 2011

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    Cyburbian dvdneal's avatar
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    I haven't tried in a while, but this year I will try to plant a tomato and basil plant in some pots. These should be a no brainer for people like me who know nothing about gardening other than put it in the ground and water it. Once I'm out of a rental house and into my own I want to start a real garden with some bell peppers, lettuce, radish, and if I can get ambitious, artichokes.
    I don't pretend to understand Brannigan's Law. I merely enforce it.

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    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    I miss having a patch of dirt to garden or even a balcony/deck to do a container garden
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

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    Cyburbian imaplanner's avatar
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    Going to try some artichokes this year. I don't know much about how to grow them though. So far we have sugar snap peas, lettuce, cilantro, spinach, basil (sweet and thai), and broccoli in the ground. Shooting for additional plantings of peppers, green onions, potatoes and carrots and maybe artichoke.
    Children in the back seat can cause accidents - and vice versa.

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    Cyburbian dvdneal's avatar
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    For the last two weekends I've told myself to go buy pots and soil for my ambitious gardening efforts (two plants). Every week it gets warmer and I think I'm missing out on prime growing time (like today). Then the snow, frost, hail, whatever comes in and I'm thankful I havene't planted anything yet. The snow is coming in a day or two, but I think this weekend I should be able to plant.
    I don't pretend to understand Brannigan's Law. I merely enforce it.

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by imaplanner View post
    Going to try some artichokes this year. I don't know much about how to grow them though.
    I briefly looked into growing artichokes. The idea of perennial vegetables is an appealing one to me - plant 'em one year and then harvest them annually after the second season without having to worry about replanting for years - what's not to like? I'm not sure where you live, but I was disappointed to learn that in MI we pretty much have to grow artichokes as an annual vegetable due to the cold climate. Given how much space they take up that makes them far less appealing, but perhaps you live in a more moderate climate, in which case I say go for it.

    http://www.vegetablegardener.com/ite...hokes/page/all
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Cyburbian dvdneal's avatar
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    I did some of my gardening this weekend with the kids. We planted strawberries, garlic, basil, vincas, and impatiens. It's fun to garden with my kids, they get competitive over who's digging a hole right or who's watering the plants.

    Next weekend I hope to plant the tomatos and get some other herbs to go with the basil. I also think I have to fix the garlic. I think the kids just burried the whole bulb and didn't break up the cloves.
    I don't pretend to understand Brannigan's Law. I merely enforce it.

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    Cyburbian Plus dandy_warhol's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by dvdneal View post
    I did some of my gardening this weekend with the kids. We planted strawberries, garlic, basil, vincas, and impatiens. It's fun to garden with my kids, they get competitive over who's digging a hole right or who's watering the plants.

    Next weekend I hope to plant the tomatos and get some other herbs to go with the basil. I also think I have to fix the garlic. I think the kids just burried the whole bulb and didn't break up the cloves.
    Sounds like you had a nice weekend of gardening! FWIW, my grandpa always said to plant the garlic in the fall.
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

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