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Thread: Attitudes and mindset of the elderly

  1. #1
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Attitudes and mindset of the elderly

    Serious question: have you ever encountered anyone over, say, the age of 95 that was open-minded and not highly opinionated?

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    Last edited by Maister; 11 Jan 2013 at 8:48 AM.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    OH....IO Hink's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    Serious question: have you ever encountered anyone over, say, the age of 95 that was open-minded and not highly opinionated?
    No. I think once you hit 90 you just realize you don't have much time left and start being REALLY honest with everyone.
    A common mistake people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools. -Douglas Adams

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    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    Serious question: have you ever encountered anyone over, say, the age of 95 that was open-minded and not highly opinionated?
    Its funny though my Mom is 86 and she's more open minded now than she was before - so I don't know?

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Hink View post
    No. I think once you hit 90 you just realize you don't have much time left and start being REALLY honest with everyone.
    Ha ha. That might explain why a disproportionate number of elderly appear to be outspoken and opinionated, but doesnt explain why should one cease to be open-minded at that age (yeah yeah they probably never were to begin with)
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Cyburbian Plus dandy_warhol's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    Serious question: have you ever encountered anyone over, say, the age of 95 that was open-minded and not highly opinionated?
    Yep. My great Aunt who died in 2011 at 102 was very open minded, kind, and thoughtful.
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

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    Cyburbian MD Planner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by dandy_warhol View post
    Yep. My great Aunt who died in 2011 at 102 was very open minded, kind, and thoughtful.
    She sounds like the polar opposite of my mother, who apparently has been close-minded, incredibly opinionated and sharp-tongued since about 1950. Jeezus!
    He's a planner, he's a dreamer, he's a sordid little schemer,
    Seems to think that money grows on trees . . .

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    Cyburbian Big Owl's avatar
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    I had two great-aunts that were 100 and 98 when they died. It was interesting as the youngest left the farm, worked in a hosiery mill, buried two husbands, and went back to the farm in her late 60's. The oldest stayed on the farm to care for their mother. The oldest was more open minded than the youngest. I always found that interesting.

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    Cyburbian dvdneal's avatar
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    My theory of old people is that they come in two categories:
    1. They are pissed off that they didn't die young and become angry (and maybe closed minded)
    2. They are so happy they made it this far they're always in a good mood (and maybe tipping the bottle a little)
    I'm hoping to be in the second category, but I've already decided to be the angry old guy at the council meeting when I retire. We must make sure the next generation of planners has that guy to deal with.
    I don't pretend to understand Brannigan's Law. I merely enforce it.

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    Cyburbian Linda_D's avatar
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    Well, I'm glad to see that we're defining "elderly" as 80+ at least ... I'm safe for another decade plus!

    FTR, given the number of younger people, say from their thirties and on up, who are close minded and opinionated, why should we be surprised that we see this same trait in the elderly, only magnified? The world is changing so rapidly, technologically and socially, that I'm not at all surprised to see even people my age (63) just give in to human nature (as in being resistant to change) and declare the old ways best.

    It's hard for most of us to imagine a world without laptops and cellphones, but people in their mid 80s remember when not every home had a phone, radio was "modern technology", and TV didn't even exist.
    If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich. -- John F. Kennedy, January 20, 1961

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    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    Serious question: have you ever encountered anyone over, say, the age of 95 that was open-minded and not highly opinionated?

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    Are they mutually exclusive?

    I consider myself highly opinionated, but also very open-minded. I'd like to think I'll be the same when I'm 97.
    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany"

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    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    My mother will be 97 tomorrow. She is more open minded than I am.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

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    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    Serious question: have you ever encountered anyone over, say, the age of 95 that was open-minded and not highly opinionated?
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    Yes. I marched in the anti-Eye-rack war demonstrations in SFO and SAC and it was wonderful to see. Retired teachers and other social service folk, mostly.

    But I agree the fallback position is settled opinion.
    -------
    Give a man a gun, and he can rob a bank. Give a man a bank, and he can rob the world.

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by btrage View post
    Are they mutually exclusive?
    Quote Originally posted by the Dictionary
    o·pin·ion·at·ed
    /əˈpinyəˌnātid/Adjective
    Conceitedly assertive and dogmatic in one's opinions.
    I'd say so. Being both "dogmatic" and "open-minded" would appear to be a contradiction.

    EDIT: it occurs to me that there may also be different interpretations of what it means to be 'opinionated' as well.
    Last edited by Maister; 11 Jan 2013 at 12:34 PM.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Cyburbian Brocktoon's avatar
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    They hate everything but Matlock.
    "If you don't like change, you're going to like irrelevance even less" General Eric Shinseki

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    OH....IO Hink's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Brocktoon View post
    They hate everything but Matlock.
    Murder She Wrote and Cesar Milan.
    A common mistake people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools. -Douglas Adams

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    Cyburbian Planit's avatar
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    Mom is in her 80s and has always had a strong opinion about politics in a certain right direction. However after the last 2 years her attitude has changed quite abit because "there are no more statesmen, just a bunch of blowhards." This is a significant step for her and surprised both my brothers & I.

    However she is now tending to tell me things in great details about her day like even what one of her friends wore to their lunch together. Also when she asked me to do something (like inspect her duplex she rents), she tells me in great detail every step she wants me to take and exactly how it needs to be done - I feel like a 10 yo getting instructions. But alas she is my mom...

    Now Get Off My Lawn!
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    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    At least with my mom, who is now 87, I think that perhaps she was more open-minded all along than I thought she was but before she got old, she just didn't share those thoughts. A few years back, I was visiting my mom and she had knocked back a few glasses of wine while we talked. She told me about a trip she had taken with a few of her friends to Spain. While in Madrid, they stayed in the house of a gay man. This dyed-in-the-wool Republican, Catholic Southern lady told me about what a nice man he was and how gracious he was while showing them around the city. No prejudice. No disapproval. Acceptance and open-mindedness.

    Her mother, on the other hand, was a mean, bigoted woman to her grave.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

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    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    Serious question: have you ever encountered anyone over, say, the age of 95 that was open-minded and not highly opinionated?

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    Not if they are still breathing.

    At that point in life I think they have a who cares mentality. As for being over 95... I think that is how it is when you hit 70.
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post
    Not if they are still breathing.

    At that point in life I think they have a who cares mentality. As for being over 95... I think that is how it is when you hit 70.
    Admittedly I pulled the number 95 somewhat at random...I simply wanted to pick an age where no one could say "speaking from experience...." and ensure all responses would be speculative. Yes, I suspect (but don't know for sure) the die is likely cast long before one hits 95.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    OH....IO Hink's avatar
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    I think this attitude can be carried over into why they steal. You know they just don't care
    A common mistake people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools. -Douglas Adams

  21. #21
    My late dear grandfather in law was sharp and eager to learn new things up til the day he died. I only hope I am so engaged when I am nearing 100 (he made it to 99).

    My step dad is 80and drives me nuts with his negative comments about young people (those under 75. I don't confront him, But my tongue is full of bite mark after having dinner with him.

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