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Thread: The inside scoop on being Catholic

  1. #26
    Cyburbian mike gurnee's avatar
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    I am too filled with guilt to respond at this time.

  2. #27
    Cyburbian Linda_D's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by stroskey View post
    This is anecdotal, but Catholics to me tend to be less forthcoming with their faith. I rarely hear Catholics asking people if they are saved, saying so-and-so is the antichrist, etc. In fact, the annual men's stag in the school cafeteria brings in kegs, allows cigar smoking, and invites local sports figures in to speak. I have never heard of a baptist church doing that. The older I get the more and more I really think it is the right way of doing things. Faith is a personal thing and I think Catholics find a good balance between religion and life.
    QFT. Catholics aren't "pushy" about their religion. If you want to hear about it, we'll tell you (as in this thread) but we won't ram it down your throat.

    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner View post
    Most Catholics are taught that actions are the way to spead the goodness of God, not through constant badgering or belittling. While what you say is true, you seem to have glossed over the countless Catholic soup kitchens, the Knights of Columbus, and St. Vincent de Paul charities.
    That's because faith alone isn't enough for salvation. You must also do good works.

    Quote Originally posted by terraplnr View post
    I was really reconsidering going back this past year and becoming more active, but there are too many things that I don’t agree with or hoops that I’d have to jump through to feel like I would be completely part of the Catholic Church again. I went to an Episcopalian service this Christmas and one of the church members said they have a “Catholic altar with an evangelical sermon” which felt about right, but am still feeling/thinking things out.
    I, too, have been thinking about joining the Episcopalians because of my differences with the Church, but it's a hard decision. The Episcopalians are much less judgemental than most Protestants.

    Quote Originally posted by otterpop View post
    The Catholic Church would be a better religion if there were more and not less people with my mother's character.
    The Church (NOT necessarily individual priests) has turned its back on all women who didn't/don't accept second-class status or who wouldn't/won't be broodmares, which is very sad because women are generally the backbone of most churches -- and they raise the next generation of church members. In the US -- and I think Europe, too -- most priests are old men. The average age of priests in the Buffalo Diocese is almost 60 years old. About half the population of WNY is nominally Catholic but parishes are being closed by the dozen because the old people are dying off and the younger people are either estranged or "unchurched". I don't think that's a unique situation in most of the areas of the country with large Catholic populations.
    If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich. -- John F. Kennedy, January 20, 1961

  3. #28
    Cyburbian beach_bum's avatar
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    Did anyone mention the different Catholics yet? I come from Irish Catholic roots, but there is Italian catholic, Eastern European catholic, Spanish catholic, etc. each brings different traditions to the table.
    "Never invest in any idea you can't illustrate with a crayon." ~Peter Lynch

  4. #29
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by beach_bum View post
    Did anyone mention the different Catholics yet? I come from Irish Catholic roots, but there is Italian catholic, Eastern European catholic, Spanish catholic, etc. each brings different traditions to the table.
    Ethnically I am mostly polish and irish, but have catholic friends of all nationalities. My schools were definitely not the least bit segregated and had Catholics from lots of different backgrounds. Being kids of the 60's there was less of a marrying among your own self-sect thing going on. As a result most of my cohort is multi-ethnic. In fact it was the odd-ball who was just Mexican, Lebanese, Black, Italian...........

    We do try to keep the polish Christmas traditions in my family (known as Wigilia).
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  5. #30
    Cyburbian TOFB's avatar
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    I was raised in a very strict and devoted Catholic family. I went to Catholic elementary school, where I was routinely beaten and demeaned (except for Sister Mary Ellen). I went to public middle school to find myself seriously behind in every subject, and was told to quit band because I was so far behind (that would have been the biggest mistake of my life). By high school, I went to 'mass' alone, instead driving around or hanging in a park, showing up at the end of mass to grab a bulletin and see who was on the altar, because undoubtedly i would be quizzed when I got home. (Dad was a parish trustee and knew everything) My two brothers were abused by one of the most notorious monster priests in the diocese, [URL="http://http://www.bishop-accountability.org/ia-davenport/assignments/Wiebler-William-F-Davenport-IA.htm"], who was moved from parish to parish. My children were mentored by an awesome, super cool priest who was suddenly removed by the Bishop and sent to Rome, apparently because he was too liberal.

    How can I be anything but an atheist now?

    Sorry, not a big fan of the catholic. . . .

  6. #31
    Cyburbian TOFB's avatar
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    I gotta stop the Debbie Downer posts . . .

  7. #32
    Cyburbian
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    TFOB, your, and your brothers, experience, is awful.

    I'm surprised that I still attend Mass after having my priest tower over me, wave his arms, and proclaim that it was all my fault that my husband was having an affair, and then have a Catholic Charities counselor tell him that he should move out. When I think about leaving the church, I can't leave the parish, the people I've gone the church will all these years. If I were to move, I'd probably find a non-catholic church.

  8. #33
    Cyburbian beach_bum's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner View post
    Ethnically I am mostly polish and irish, but have catholic friends of all nationalities. My schools were definitely not the least bit segregated and had Catholics from lots of different backgrounds. Being kids of the 60's there was less of a marrying among your own self-sect thing going on. As a result most of my cohort is multi-ethnic. In fact it was the odd-ball who was just Mexican, Lebanese, Black, Italian...........
    The school I went to had Philippino, Vietmaneses and Lebanese Catholic kids among the European-rooted Catholics. We were very close to large naval base which was a big reason we had so many Philippinos. I enjoy some of the Mardi-gras/French Catholic traditions. My school's clergy and nuns were all Irish, so St. Patricks day was a big deal, they would let us wear green shirts instead of white that day!

    My other Catholic roots are French and I found out that my ancestor (French) was an architect who designed a Catholic Church (that still stands today) in Dubuque, Iowa.
    "Never invest in any idea you can't illustrate with a crayon." ~Peter Lynch

  9. #34
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by beach_bum View post
    Did anyone mention the different Catholics yet? I come from Irish Catholic roots, but there is Italian catholic, Eastern European catholic, Spanish catholic, etc. each brings different traditions to the table.
    I live across the street from my church's cemetery. You can see that there were originally ethnic sections - Irish, Italian, and eastern European. A lot of the Italian head stones have or had photographs of the deceased on them.

  10. #35
    Cyburbian Plus Whose Yur Planner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by beach_bum View post
    Did anyone mention the different Catholics yet? I come from Irish Catholic roots, but there is Italian catholic, Eastern European catholic, Spanish catholic, etc. each brings different traditions to the table.
    Both of my families roots are German Catholic. I've lived in places where mass would be said in German occasionally. Then again, the Lutherns would have occasionally have services in German too.
    When did I go from Luke Skywalker to Obi-Wan Kenobi?

  11. #36
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    I was born and raised Catholic Heavy.

    I spent nine years in Catholic school. I attended Mass every Friday morning at school and again on the weekend.

    I was an Altar Boy for many years, including my freshmen year in high school.

    All of the stereotypes you hear about Catholicism are rooted in truth.
    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany"

  12. #37
    Cyburbian Linda_D's avatar
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    My family's roots are Polish and Italian.

    In Buffalo, into the 1970s, the neighborhoods, parishes, and their parochial schools were largely ethnically segregated. The geographical areas covered by the parishes was very small. Even the kids with non-ethnic last names tended to be the parish ethnicity through their moms. When I lived in the Grant-Amherst/West Hertel area of Buffalo from the late 1960s through most of the 1980s, there were 3 main parishes: Assumption (Polish), St Elizabeth's (Hungarian), and St Florian's (Polish), all with their own parish schools. My one set of cousins on my mom's side were raised very strict Catholics and were instructed in Polish and English in the primary grades in the early 1960s at St Florian's.

    The transition in Buffalo's Catholic parishes often reflected the changes in their neighborhoods. St Brigid's transitioned from Irish to African American. St Columba's transitioned from Irish to Italian to African American and Italian. Holy Cross changed from Italian to Italian/Hispanic/African American. Buffalo's Catholics also established ethnic Catholic parishes in the suburbs, most notably in Cheektowaga where Polish Catholics from Buffalo's East Side established a string of Polish Catholic parishes and in West Seneca where Irish Catholics also established several.
    If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich. -- John F. Kennedy, January 20, 1961

  13. #38
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    This discussion of the 'different' Catholics has stirred a memory.

    My great grandparents had a farm in Michigan for when the factory work was slow. It was in a small town on the Saginaw Bay (Lac Huron). Interestingly, up until a few years ago it had two catholic churches, two catholic cemetaries and was a divided place. The Poles went to one church and the French went to the other. If you were any other ethnic group I guess you were SOL and were driving into Bay City (the home of tilt wheel and Madonna!)!
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  14. #39
    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    Latino flavored catholic here and yes, we have a lot of mother mary hanging out in my folks house and lots of prayers to god knows how many saints and yes, we got some crazy traditions to boot
    Men do dumb $hit... it is what they do to correct the problem that counts.

  15. #40
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Raf View post
    Latino flavored catholic here and yes, we have a lot of mother mary hanging out in my folks house and lots of prayers to god knows how many saints and yes, we got some crazy traditions to boot
    We poles have got plenty of Mary devotion as well. My old house had a backyard Mary and I sure left her where she was! I would get a strange feeling hosing the bird poop and cobwebs off of her! Growing up, there was a family down the block that is half Mexican and half Polish. You know they were not escaping Mary traditions! I still run into them at the St. Patrick's day parade.
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  16. #41
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Raf View post
    Latino flavored catholic here and yes, we have a lot of mother mary hanging out in my folks house and lots of prayers to god knows how many saints and yes, we got some crazy traditions to boot
    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner View post
    We poles have got plenty of Mary devotion as well. My old house had a backyard Mary and I sure left her where she was! I would get a strange feeling hosing the bird poop and cobwebs off of her! Growing up, there was a family down the block that is half Mexican and half Polish. You know they were not escaping Mary traditions! I still run into them at the St. Patrick's day parade.
    Easy there fellas.

    This German Catholic got a shit load of Mary shoved in my face.

    My mother still signs greeting cards "May Mother Mary Protect You".

    (I'm picturing the fight scene in Anchorman, with a bunch of Catholics fighting about who is more authentic)
    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany"

  17. #42
    Cyburbian beach_bum's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by btrage View post
    Easy there fellas.

    This German Catholic got a shit load of Mary shoved in my face.

    My mother still signs greeting cards "May Mother Mary Protect You".

    (I'm picturing the fight scene in Anchorman, with a bunch of Catholics fighting about who is more authentic)
    Guess who was picked by her 8th grade Catholic school class to do the "May Crowning" of Mary...that's right, me

    We had a replica of the Grotto with a Mary statue next to the school.
    "Never invest in any idea you can't illustrate with a crayon." ~Peter Lynch

  18. #43
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by beach_bum View post
    Guess who was picked by her 8th grade Catholic school class to do the "May Crowning" of Mary...that's right, me

    We had a replica of the Grotto with a Mary statue next to the school.


    In 8th grade, my friend and I were picked to carry the Mary statue from school to church for the May Crowning. I'm talking big statue. It was put on some wooden boards and I swear we almost dropped the thing countless times.
    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany"

  19. #44
    Cyburbian Coragus's avatar
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    I was born, raised, and confirmed Roman Catholic. I've said this before about the faith and I'll write it here. It's easy to be Catholic, but it's damn hard to be a goodCatholic.

    Having moved from Michigan to Kentucky, I also now realized how much the culture influences the faith. Where I came from, Las Vegas nights were regular staples for fundraisers and I've seen a few drinking priests in my time at family functions. Down here though, I suggested to a couple representatives of a local parish whose property (not a church, former retreat center) is in my study area on a study that they might want to team up with the local horse racing park if they built a "racino" and the look on their faces made me realize that I'd accidentally blasphemised!
    Maintaining enthusiasm in the face of crushing apathy.

  20. #45
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by btrage View post
    Easy there fellas.

    This German Catholic got a shit load of Mary shoved in my face.

    My mother still signs greeting cards "May Mother Mary Protect You".

    (I'm picturing the fight scene in Anchorman, with a bunch of Catholics fighting about who is more authentic)
    My Mary can kick your Mary's @$$!
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  21. #46
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Raf View post
    Latino flavored catholic here and yes, we have a lot of mother mary hanging out in my folks house and lots of prayers to god knows how many saints and yes, we got some crazy traditions to boot
    I've noticed that Colombian Catholics are a lot more laid-back regarding the official Church's stances on premarital sex and birth control. My wife likes to put up lots of pictures of Mary too. When in Colomiba we went to a Mass at this gorgeous cathedral - where the priests held a mass that never really ended, just restarted. People came in and stayed until the mass got back to where they came in and then left. At one point a dog walked up the aisle and then wandered out. Don't know if it was looking for his master or just wanted to come in out of the sun. No one paid him much mind and he was well-behaved.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  22. #47
    Cyburbian terraplnr's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by beach_bum View post
    Guess who was picked by her 8th grade Catholic school class to do the "May Crowning" of Mary...that's right, me
    Oh I had forgotten all about that! It was like our 8th grade equivalent of Homecoming Queen. One of my friends was chosen to crown Mary, I was one of the assistants (i.e., in her court).

  23. #48
    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by beach_bum View post
    Guess who was picked by her 8th grade Catholic school class to do the "May Crowning" of Mary...that's right, me

    We had a replica of the Grotto with a Mary statue next to the school.
    Quote Originally posted by btrage View post


    In 8th grade, my friend and I were picked to carry the Mary statue from school to church for the May Crowning. I'm talking big statue. It was put on some wooden boards and I swear we almost dropped the thing countless times.
    Quote Originally posted by terraplnr View post
    Oh I had forgotten all about that! It was like our 8th grade equivalent of Homecoming Queen. One of my friends was chosen to crown Mary, I was one of the assistants (i.e., in her court).
    Poo Poo all yall.. i was christian citizen of the month of may in 8th grade.. ya, that's right, i was tight with the homie jesus.
    Men do dumb $hit... it is what they do to correct the problem that counts.

  24. #49
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    No priest has ever been able to answer this burning question I have: If Jesus was a Jew, why the Puerto Rican name?
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  25. #50
    Cyburbian terraplnr's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Raf View post
    Poo Poo all yall.. i was christian citizen of the month of may in 8th grade.. ya, that's right, i was tight with the homie jesus.
    For a few years, we would have "student of the month" or "most improved student" for the older classes (I think 5-8th) and the winners would get to go bowling with our nearing-retirment-age priest and with the school principal. I remember going once or twice. The running joke was that you wouldn't want to stand right behind Father as he was bowling, because every third month or so he would accidentally throw the ball behind him.

    I just looked up my childhood parish online (I haven't been since 2001 when my parents moved away), and on their website, part of their logo is the phrase "for the love of God." How could you put that in your logo and not crack up?!

    I miss their annual Easter fundraiser... little old ladies would make chocolate eggs (filled with various delicious fillings), chocolate bunnnies, etc. in the school's basement and we'd eat sell as many as we could.

    Memories...

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