Urban planning community | #theplannerlife

+ Reply to thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 30 of 30

Thread: What happened to the homebuilding industry?

  1. #26
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
    Registered
    Jun 2003
    Location
    at the neighboring pub
    Posts
    6,461
    Quote Originally posted by Dan View post
    I didn't watch all the videos. Were any well-known national builders involved?

    There's a strong "local first" and "out-of-town developers are evil" sentiment around my neck of the woods. I'm wondering if local mom-and-pop builders really do put out a better product than Pulte, D.R. Horton, Toll Brothers, etc.
    I'm not a big fan of production builders, but at least the ones around here do a fairly good quality finish out. They all meet the same building codes, so in my experience the differentiating factor tends to be the final fit & finish. On that, the mom & pop almost always does better.

    That being said, in my experience it is the local mom & pop custom builder that tries to circumvent processes and building codes most often, often attempting to use political connections to do so. Production builders around here are focused on efficiency and getting into pissing matches with the City hurts their efficiency. We have the occasional production general contractor that we have to wack with a tack hammer, but otherwise it is fairly smooth sailing.

    Not all production builders are created equal. We have a lot of regional mid-size production builders. Those tend to have the best of both worlds.

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

  2. #27
    Cyburbian dvdneal's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Remote command post at local bar
    Posts
    12,478
    I think part of it goes to the buyer. You have to inspect your own house during construction and demand quality. Mine was a Pulte house in Phoenix. I checked on it daily and ended up telling the foreman to replace studs that were wracked or overhanging the bottom plate, fix electrical and plumbing holes (they drilled to close to the side), etc. It didn't take long for him to start doing this right (not that it was horrible). By the time we got the the finish inspection there wasn't much for them to fix and he had tagged most of the problems for me before I pointed them out. I think it also helped that I would bring a case of beer once a week for whoever was on site.
    I don't pretend to understand Brannigan's Law. I merely enforce it.

  3. #28
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Vegas BABY!!
    Posts
    8,285
    Blog entries
    1

    Yes

    Quote Originally posted by Suburb Repairman View post
    I'm not a big fan of production builders, but at least the ones around here do a fairly good quality finish out. They all meet the same building codes, so in my experience the differentiating factor tends to be the final fit & finish. On that, the mom & pop almost always does better.

    That being said, in my experience it is the local mom & pop custom builder that tries to circumvent processes and building codes most often, often attempting to use political connections to do so. Production builders around here are focused on efficiency and getting into pissing matches with the City hurts their efficiency. We have the occasional production general contractor that we have to wack with a tack hammer, but otherwise it is fairly smooth sailing.

    Not all production builders are created equal. We have a lot of regional mid-size production builders. Those tend to have the best of both worlds.
    Good points.....production builders seek consistency in the application of regulations, in order to better predict costs associated with building and to schedule financing.
    Mom and pops need to seek any advantage they can by cutting corners to save TIME in relationship to lending costs. Mom and Pop have more flexibility to create a better finish. Like allowing the customer to pick out fixtures based on a budget and not forcing stock finishes on the customer simply because the production builder got a sweet deal from Vinnie on crappy light fixtures and third rate carpet.
    “The way of acquiescence leads to moral and spiritual suicide. The way of violence leads to bitterness in the survivors and brutality in the destroyers. But, the way of non-violence leads to redemption and the creation of the beloved community.”
    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
    - See more at: http://www.thekingcenter.org/king-ph....r7W02j3S.dpuf

  4. #29
    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Land of Confusion
    Posts
    3,872
    According to builders a serious lack of skilled labor is holding back housing deliveries across the country:

    http://www.cnbc.com/2015/07/17/homeb...-of-labor.html

    I find it surprising that labor shortages are a problem now, considering how slow things have been in construction since the mid-2000s. Then again, skilled workers are retiring and the younger generations probably aren't going into construction like they once were. Our society has convinced all these kids they need to go to college when in reality a good number of them would be far better off learning a trade. In any event, the labor issue is huge when it comes to issues of housing production and quality.

  5. #30
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
    Registered
    Jun 2003
    Location
    at the neighboring pub
    Posts
    6,461
    Quote Originally posted by hilldweller View post
    According to builders a serious lack of skilled labor is holding back housing deliveries across the country:

    http://www.cnbc.com/2015/07/17/homeb...-of-labor.html

    I find it surprising that labor shortages are a problem now, considering how slow things have been in construction since the mid-2000s. Then again, skilled workers are retiring and the younger generations probably aren't going into construction like they once were. Our society has convinced all these kids they need to go to college when in reality a good number of them would be far better off learning a trade. In any event, the labor issue is huge when it comes to issues of housing production and quality.
    The shortage isn't just retirements and fewer new folks entering trades... it is unexpected competition. A lot of the skilled labor from the homebuilding industry, at least in Texas, has shifted to oilfield work. An electrician can easily earn double with oil field clients. Plumbers especially have been hard hit on this due to fracking demand for plumbers. It is generally considered the number 1 problem for builders in Texas these days (usually "damn commie planners" is number 1).

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

+ Reply to thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

More at Cyburbia

  1. Whatever happened to...
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 93
    Last post: 24 May 2010, 4:52 PM
  2. Whatever Happened to......
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 15
    Last post: 08 Jun 2006, 9:26 PM
  3. Replies: 43
    Last post: 15 Aug 2005, 2:38 PM