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Thread: The totally serious, and in no way frivilous thread.

  1. #1
    Cyburbian el Guapo's avatar
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    The totally serious, and in no way frivilous thread.

    Advice for our new parents on a very Serious subject.

    Allergic Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)

    Conjunctivitis is one of the most common and treatable eye conditions in children and adults. Often called "pink eye," it is an inflammation of the conjunctiva, the tissue that lines the inside of the eyelid and helps keep the eyelid and eyeball moist.

    Conjunctivitis can be caused by viruses, bacteria, irritating substances (shampoos, dirt, smoke, and especially pool chlorine), sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), or allergens (substances that cause allergies). Pink eye caused by bacteria, viruses, or STDs can spread easily from person to person but is not a serious health risk if diagnosed promptly; allergic conjunctivitis is not contagious.

    It is important to find out whether your pink eye is caused by allergies or infection, because each condition has different treatments. This section focuses on allergic conjunctivitis.

    What Are The Symptoms Of Allergic Conjunctivitis?

    Redness in the white of the eye or inner eyelid
    Increased amount of tears
    Itchy eyes
    Blurred vision
    Swelling of the eyelid
    See your ophthalmologist (a doctor and surgeon who is trained to treat eye conditions) or optometrist (doctor trained to treat eye conditions) or family doctor if you have any of these persistent symptoms.

    How Is Allergic Conjunctivitis Treated?

    Allergy-associated conjunctivitis should be evaluated by your doctor and an allergist. It may disappear completely, either when the allergy is treated with antihistamines, or when the allergen is removed. Your doctor may recommend you use one or more of the following:

    Ocular (topical) decongestants -- these medicines reduce redness by constricting small blood vessels in the eye. These medications are not recommended for long-term use. Using these drops for more than a few days can lead to a worsening of the swelling and redness, which is called a "rebound" effect.
    Ocular (topical) antihistamines -- these contain medicine that reduces redness, swelling, and itching by blocking the actions of histamine, the chemical that causes these symptoms of allergy. They are available both over-the-counter and by prescription.
    Ocular (topical) steroids -- when other medicines fail, your doctor may prescribe steroid eye drops to relieve the symptoms of conjunctivitis. These must be used with the supervision of your doctor since they can cause elevated pressure inside of the eye, which can lead to vision damage. These drops can also increase the risk of cataracts.
    Cromolyn -- this medicine works by preventing specialized cells from releasing histamine. It works best when started before symptoms occur.
    Immunotherapy - allergy shots also can be effective for treating allergic conjunctivitis.
    What Can I Do To Help Relieve Symptoms?
    Remove contact lenses, if you wear them.
    Place cold compresses on your eyes.
    Try nonprescription "artificial tears," a type of eye drop that may help relieve itching and burning (Note: Other types of eye drops may irritate the eyes and should not be used.) Do not use the same bottle of drops in the other eye if it is not affected.
    But the best defense against allergic conjunctivitis is a good offense: try to avoid the triggers for your allergies in the first place.

    Other Tips:

    Don't touch or rub the affected eye(s).
    Wash your hands often with soap and warm water.
    Wash your bed linens, pillowcases, and towels in hot water and detergent to reduce allergens
    Avoid wearing eye makeup.
    Don't share eye makeup with anyone else.
    Never wear another person's contact lens.
    Wear glasses instead of contact lenses to reduce irritation.
    Wash your hands after applying the eye drops or ointment to your eye or your child's eye.
    Do not use eye drops that were used for an infected eye in a noninfected one.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Thank you, EG, for bringing to light this serious, yet frivilous issue.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian el Guapo's avatar
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    You're quite welcome, and If Dan is not in a good mood these may be our very last posts. He did bring forth the Virgin Mary as an Icon of restraint to warn us.

  4. #4
    Corn Burning Fool giff57's avatar
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    Plantar fasciitis

    Plantar fasciitis (inflammation of the plantar fascia) is the most common cause of heel pain seen by an orthopedist. It is common in several sub-groups of people, including runners and other athletes, people who have jobs that require a fair amount of walking or standing (especially if it is done on a hard surface), and in some cases it is seen in people who have put on weight -- either by dietary indiscretion or pregnancy.
    The plantar fascia is a broad ligament-like structure that extends from the heel bone to the base of the toes, acting like a thick rubberband on the bottom arch of the foot. With a few extra pounds on board, or with activities such as exercise, the plantar fascia can develop microtrauma at its insertion into the heel bone, or anywhere along its length. This causes pain which can be quite severe at times.

    One disturbing fact about plantar fasciitis is that it sometimes takes many months to resolve. Indeed, it takes approximately 6 months for 75% of people to recover from this problem. 98% of people seem to be better at 12 months.











    Treatment of plantar fasciitis consists of 3 stages:

    Stage 1 involves prescribing the patient a heel cushion to decrease shock absorption of the plantar fascia, as well as a short course of medication to decrease inflammation in the heel.

    Stage 2 may involve cortisone injections into the heel region, if Stage 1 has failed to bring significant relief. Other modalities in Stage 2 include: orthotics, taping, physical therapy, and night splinting.

    Stage 3 is for those who have had plantar fasciitis for one year or longer, whose symptoms are severe and preventing them from their job or recreation. It involves a surgical release of part of the insertion of the plantar fascia. However, this surgery is rare, as most people do have significant relief from non-surgical treatment.

    Text prepared by Jonathan S. Jaivin, MD
    Southern California Orthopedic Institute

  5. #5
          Downtown's avatar
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    I could do a treatise on Reproductive Endocrinology, if anyone was so inclined to learn all about unexplained female infertility!

  6. #6
    Cyburbian el Guapo's avatar
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    Why Kelly, I'm enraptured with curiosity. Do tell...do tell...

  7. #7
          Downtown's avatar
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    hee. we could do an advice column! Ask the Pseudo Reproductive Endocrinologist*! Areas of expertise include:
    -Why aren't I ovulating?
    -I want to kill my husband and half of New England - could it be the Clomid?
    -Where can I unload 7 of my octuplets?
    -HSG - WTF?
    -What is baby dust and is it legal to snort?
    -Sperm Analysis - not just for suspected rapists.
    -Injectibles - Bend over and say "Ouch".
    -Where to buy pregnancy tests in bulk
    -Why turning to your husband and saying "Hon, temps are up, Mucus is egg-white like, climb on!" isn't sexy.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Jeff's avatar
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    Posting random news articles is frivolous in my book....

    I like it, I'm gonna have to try it some time.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian SW MI Planner's avatar
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    hee. we could do an advice column! Ask the Pseudo Reproductive Endocrinologist
    Hey Kel - if all doesn't go the way we want it to in the next few months, I might just take you up on that!

  10. #10
          Downtown's avatar
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    I've actually become a resource center for all my girlfriends who aren't getting knocked up as quickly as they'd like.

  11. #11
    Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator NHPlanner's avatar
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    Originally posted by KMateja
    -Why turning to your husband and saying "Hon, temps are up, Mucus is egg-white like, climb on!" isn't sexy.
    AAAARRRRRGGGGHHHH!!! I've actually heard a variation on that from the person that sleeps on my left. :p
    "Growth is inevitable and desirable, but destruction of community character is not. The question is not whether your part of the world is going to change. The question is how." -- Edward T. McMahon, The Conservation Fund

  12. #12
    Cyburbian el Guapo's avatar
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    Originally posted by KMateja
    I've actually become a resource center for all my girlfriends who aren't getting knocked up as quickly as they'd like.
    So, was I in my college days!

    Keep pitching Kelly!

  13. #13
    Cyburbian Jeff's avatar
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    Originally posted by KMateja
    I've actually become a resource center for all my girlfriends who aren't getting knocked up as quickly as they'd like.
    What are you the surrogate mother???

  14. #14
    Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator NHPlanner's avatar
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    Originally posted by El Guapo


    So, was I in my college days!

    Keep pitching Kelly!
    That was just a bad change-up left right over the middle of the plate...
    "Growth is inevitable and desirable, but destruction of community character is not. The question is not whether your part of the world is going to change. The question is how." -- Edward T. McMahon, The Conservation Fund

  15. #15
    Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator NHPlanner's avatar
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    Originally posted by KMateja
    I could do a treatise on Reproductive Endocrinology, if anyone was so inclined to learn all about unexplained female infertility!
    Here's your Reproductive Endocrinology Glossary. Kel:

    Glossary
    This is an alphabetical list of terms used at this site, with brief definitions. You can scroll down to find the term you are interested in, or use your browser's "search" or "find" tool to search the page for likely terms. If you don't find what you want here, try our links to some more exhaustive sites.

    Amenorrhea: Absence of menstruation

    Andrology: Science of diseases of males, including infertility, spermatogenesis and sexual dysfunction

    Anovulation: Total absence of ovulation, menses may still occur - see amenorrhea

    Ectopic Pregnancy: Pregnancy in which the fertilized egg implants outside the uterine cavity

    Embryo cryopreservation: Procedure in which embryos are preserved by freezing

    Endometriosis: Presence of endometrial tissue in abnormal locations

    Endometrium: Mucus membrane lining the uterus

    Hysteroscopy: Diagnostic procedure in which a lighted scope (hysteroscope) is inserted through the cervix into the uterus to enable to the
    physician to view the inside of the uterus

    in vitro oocyte insemination: In IVF, the addition of sperm to a culture dish containing an egg

    Infertility: Inability of a couple to achieve a pregnancy after one year of regular unprotected sexual relations, or the inability of the woman to carry a pregnancy to live birth

    Intrauterine insemination (IUI): Placement of washed sperm into the uterus

    Laparoscopy: Direct visualization of the ovaries and exterior of the fallopian tubes and uterus through a surgical instrument inserted through a small incision below the navel

    Micromanipulation: Process whereby a single sperm is injected under the egg's shell or directly into the egg to facilitate fertilization

    Myomectomy: Surgical removal of a tumor (myoma) in the uterine muscular wall

    Ovulation induction: Use of female hormone therapy to stimulate oocyte development and release

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome: Development of multiple cysts in the ovaries due to arrested follicular growth

    Uterine fibroids: Benign tumor made up of fibrous and muscular tissue in the uterine wall

    Courtest of http://www.stanfordivf.com/glossary.html
    "Growth is inevitable and desirable, but destruction of community character is not. The question is not whether your part of the world is going to change. The question is how." -- Edward T. McMahon, The Conservation Fund

  16. #16
    Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator NHPlanner's avatar
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    Another helpful health fact sheet

    Gout
    WHAT IS GOUT?

    Known as "the disease of kings and the king of diseases," gout has been studied by physicians and has caused suffering in countless humans at least since the days of Hippocrates. Formerly a leading cause of painful and disabling chronic arthritis, gout has been all but conquered by advances in research. Unfortunately, many people with gout continue to suffer because knowledge of effective treatments has been slow to spread to patients and their physicians.

    CAUSE

    Gout is caused by an excess of uric acid in the body. This excess can be caused by an increase in production by the body, by under-elimination of uric acid by the kidneys or by increased intake of foods containing purines which are metabolized to uric acid in the body. Certain meats, seafood, dried peas and beans are particularly high in purines. Alcoholic beverages may also significantly increase uric acid levels and precipitate gout attacks.

    With time, elevated levels of uric acid in the blood may lead to deposits around joints. Eventually, the uric acid may form needle-like crystals in joints, leading to acute gout attacks. Uric acid may also collect under the skin as tophi or in the urinary tract as kidney stones.

    HEALTH IMPACT

    Gout afflicts an estimated 840 out of 100,000 people.
    Gout and its complications occur more commonly and at a younger age in males.
    Gout is strongly associated with obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and diabetes.
    DIAGNOSIS

    Since several other kinds of arthritis can mimic a gout attack, and since treatment is specific to gout, proper diagnosis is essential. The definitive diagnosis of gout is dependent on finding uric acid crystals in the joint fluid during an acute attack. However, uric acid levels in the blood alone are often misleading and may be transiently normal or even low. Additionally, uric acid levels are often elevated in individuals without gout.

    TREATMENT

    Since the 1800s, colchicine has been the standard treatment for acute gout. While colchicine is very effective, it often causes nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. These side effects are uncommon when this drug is given intravenously. Because of the unpleasant side effects of colchicine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have become the treatment of choice for most acute attacks of gout. The NSAID that is most widely used to treat acute gout is indomethacin. NSAIDs may also have significant toxicity, but if used for the short-term, are generally well tolerated. Aspirin and aspirin-containing products should be avoided during acute attacks.

    Therapy directed at normalizing uric acid levels in the blood should be considered for patients who have had multiple gout attacks or have developed tophi or kidney stones. Several drugs that help the kidneys eliminate uric acid are available, such as probenecid, and a drug that blocks production of uric acid by the body, such as alopurinol. The choice between these two types of drugs depends on the amount of uric acid in the urine. With correct treatment, gout should be well controlled in almost all cases.

    THE RHEUMATOLOGIST’S ROLE IN THE TREATMENT OF GOUT

    Historically, gout has been a major cause of destructive and disabling arthritis. Today, it represents a victory for medical investigation. Through the research of rheumatologists, gout is one of the success stories for modern medicine. As experts in treating gout, rheumatologists serve as educators of patients with gout and their physicians.

    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    If you want to find a rheumatologist in your area, check the American College of Rheumatology membership directory. If you want more information on this or any other form of arthritis, contact the Arthritis Foundation at (800) 283-7800 or visit the Arthritis Foundation web site at www.arthritis.org.

    © 2000 American College of Rheumatology
    "Growth is inevitable and desirable, but destruction of community character is not. The question is not whether your part of the world is going to change. The question is how." -- Edward T. McMahon, The Conservation Fund

  17. #17
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Damn, I just ran out of Diet Coke.

  18. #18
    Cyburbian Emeritus Chet's avatar
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    OMG Kel I'm cracking up. Go to a one hour meeting and look what I miss...

  19. #19
    Cyburbian el Guapo's avatar
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    Thanks for the new title NHP!

  20. #20
    Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator NHPlanner's avatar
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    Originally posted by El Guapo
    Thanks for the new title NHP!
    I just choked on a pretzel...you're welcome...
    "Growth is inevitable and desirable, but destruction of community character is not. The question is not whether your part of the world is going to change. The question is how." -- Edward T. McMahon, The Conservation Fund

  21. #21
    Cyburbian Habanero's avatar
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    Originally posted by NHPlanner


    I just choked on a pretzel...you're welcome...
    NHPlanner for President!
    When Jesus said "love your enemies", he probably didn't mean kill them.

  22. #22
    Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator NHPlanner's avatar
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    Originally posted by TexasPlanner


    NHPlanner for President!
    No thanks....I turned down a nomination to run a couple years ago......for NNECAPA chapter president that is.
    "Growth is inevitable and desirable, but destruction of community character is not. The question is not whether your part of the world is going to change. The question is how." -- Edward T. McMahon, The Conservation Fund

  23. #23
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    If you insist ...



    Rectal bleeding is a sign that something is wrong. It is usually something minor that can be easily diagnosed, but not always. It is, therefore, important that the specific cause of rectal bleeding be identified so appropriate treatment can be started and the problem corrected. Even though rectal bleeding may not be serious, an individual should never assume this to be the case. Most importantly, rectal bleeding may be a sign of rectal cancer.

    The Causes of Rectal Bleeding

    Fissure - The passage of a hard stool or severe diarrhea may tear the lining tissue of the anus. This problem is similar to having cracked lips in cold weather. Nerve endings and blood vessels are exposed so that pain and bleeding occur with bowel movements. Frequent warm baths and bulking agents, used to keep stools soft, usually correct this problem. Sometimes surgery is needed.


    Keep it up, and I post the rest.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  24. #24
          Downtown's avatar
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    OMG! Tim, Guap - you guys are too funny - love the new title Guap!
    Here's my next submission:
    el·e·phan·ti·a·sis ( P ) Pronunciation Key (l-fn-t-ss)
    n.
    Chronic, often extreme enlargement and hardening of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue, especially of the legs and external genitals, resulting from lymphatic obstruction and usually caused by infestation of the lymph glands and vessels with a filarial worm.

  25. #25
    Cyburbian Plus PlannerGirl's avatar
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    hehe one of my fav words

    Main Entry: sub·mis·sion
    Pronunciation: s&b-'mi-sh&n
    Function: noun
    Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin submission-, submissio act of lowering, from submittere
    Date: 14th century
    1 a : a legal agreement to submit to the decision of arbitrators b : an act of submitting something (as for consideration or inspection); also : something submitted (as a manuscript)
    2 : the condition of being submissive , humble, or compliant
    3 : an act of submitting to the authority or control of another
    "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." Ben Franklin

    Remember this motto to live by: "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming 'WOO- HOO what a ride!'"

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