Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Who put the French in French Fries?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Emeritus Chet's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    South Milwaukee
    Posts
    8,935

    Who put the French in French Fries?


  2. #2
    Cyburbian Planderella's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 1998
    Location
    NOLA
    Posts
    4,468
    It sounds like it could be cool.
    "A witty woman is a treasure, a witty beauty is a power!"

  3. #3
    Cyburbian H's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2003
    Location
    MKS
    Posts
    2,847
    How did the French get the bad rap (originally, not this past winter with Iraq)?

    I have never been to France, but it seems that even as a boy, I had the impression that the French were “snooty”.

    Does anyone know how this started?
    "Those who plan do better than those who do not plan, even though they rarely stick to their plan." - Winston Churchill

  4. #4
    Cyburbian prudence's avatar
    Registered
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Purgatory (Mad-town)
    Posts
    675
    Originally posted by Huston
    How did the French get the bad rap (originally, not this past winter with Iraq)?

    I have never been to France, but it seems that even as a boy, I had the impression that the French were “snooty”.

    Does anyone know how this started?
    It seems the French only have the time and patience for others when the German Army is sipping coffee at every bistro in Paris...
    "Dear Prudence...won't you open up your eyes? "

  5. #5
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Santiago, Chile
    Posts
    4,767
    hmmm I wonder, what country helped the US in their independance? Could it be France? It sure wasn't the (now best buddy) British!

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Emeritus Chet's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    South Milwaukee
    Posts
    8,935
    Originally posted by SkeLeton
    hmmm I wonder, what country helped the US in their independance? Could it be France? It sure wasn't the (now best buddy) British!
    That was different. They only did it on the "enemy of my enemy is my friend" principle. They supported the rebellion to weaken the British Empire, not to aid a struggling upstart with graniose ideals.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian H's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2003
    Location
    MKS
    Posts
    2,847
    Originally posted by Chet
    That was different. They only did it on the "enemy of my enemy is my friend" principle. They supported the rebellion to weaken the British Empire, not to aid a struggling upstart with graniose ideals.
    Yes, they also (unofficially) supported the Confederacy during the War Between the States, I suspect only to see our structural fabric weakened by being split.
    "Those who plan do better than those who do not plan, even though they rarely stick to their plan." - Winston Churchill

  8. #8

    Registered
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    1,548
    Originally posted by Huston
    Yes, they also (unofficially) supported the Confederacy during the War Between the States, I suspect only to see our structural fabric weakened by being split.
    I thought that was only because they wanted the free and easy export of cotton from the South.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian H's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2003
    Location
    MKS
    Posts
    2,847
    Originally posted by pete-rock
    I thought that was only because they wanted the free and easy export of cotton from the South.
    Yes, that would also be on the list of reasons why.
    "Those who plan do better than those who do not plan, even though they rarely stick to their plan." - Winston Churchill

  10. #10
    Cyburbian jresta's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    1,472
    The big textile industry was in England during our civil war - most of the cotton exports went there. The french had their own cotton kingdom on other continents.

    Neither country really supported either side of our civil war.

    Either way, the french were on the verge of their own bourgeois revolution just as ours was coming to a close. I really don't consider Louis the XVI as the embodiment of the character of the French people at the time.

    As for french people being "snooty". Going to Paris and expecting to get around by walking up to people and posing questions in english will get you the same reaction as going up to someone in Manhattan and asking them for directions in Russian.

    It's the biggest city in Europe. People are impatient and in a hurry just like they are in every big city. Americans on vacation don't seem to understand this.

    Outside of Paris, even in other big cities like Lyon (where Italian is more common than english) people are generally nothing less than accomodating. The smaller the town the more welcoming the people.

    In places like Nice you'll prob. run into the same city attitudes you would as if you'd gone to Miami Beach. It's also a place that sees a lot of american traffic.

    And if you've ever traveled outside of a tour group and come across a group of Americans - the stereotypes are usually true.

    Maybe i'll have to tell the story about the american college student i was sitting across from on the Piccadily Line in London on my way into town from Heathrow. - tomorrow.
    Indeed you can usually tell when the concepts of democracy and citizenship are weakening. There is an increase in the role of charity and in the worship of volunteerism. These represent the élite citizen's imitation of noblesse oblige; that is, of pretending to be aristocrats or oligarchs, as opposed to being citizens.

  11. #11
    Cyburbian H's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2003
    Location
    MKS
    Posts
    2,847
    Originally posted by jresta
    And if you've ever traveled outside of a tour group and come across a group of Americans - the stereotypes are usually true.

    Maybe i'll have to tell the story about the american college student i was sitting across from on the Piccadily Line in London on my way into town from Heathrow. - tomorrow.
    That statement is so on the money.

    Please do tell you Piccadily Line story.

    Ps. I was always taught in history that the French did indeed unofficially support the South in the War.
    "Those who plan do better than those who do not plan, even though they rarely stick to their plan." - Winston Churchill

  12. #12
    Cyburbian jresta's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    1,472
    so i'm on the picaddily line - and if you don't know flying to europe - the flights from the east coast leave usually around 8 or 9 pm and with a 6 hour flight and 5 hour time change and another hour for customs and baggage claim you usually found yourself waiting for a train about 10 am local time.

    You're tired and disoriented in the worst of ways and the last thing you want to do is to hear someone yaking away.

    The Piccadily line runs from Heathrow all the way to the northeast fringes of London. We were staying with friends in a place called Barnett. The ride is a cruel 90 minutes but it's cheap and direct.

    The train pulls up and goes through it's loop of heathrow . Apparently at the previous terminal an american princess who was going to school in London was being visited by her old high school friends. We were unfortunate enough to be sitting directly across from her. By the time we realized our mistake the car was full so moving wasn't an option.

    She was talking about how much she loved London and how she was going to show her friends all of the sights. Except she wasn't just telling her friends. She was telling the entire train. English people aren't given to staring but the eye-rolling was abundant.

    20 minutes into the trip the subject turns to Italy and the three young women begin swapping war stories punctuated with "like" and "ya'know" about every third word or so. Three people could not have projected the concept of privelege any better. A month in Venice, a few weeks in Rome, a weekend in Genoa. Mind you, i've been to a few of these places myself but i've also been working for ten years (as opposed to being 2 years out of high school.)

    My two travel companions and I kept cringing at certain expressions they used. We kept silent the entire time so as not to be associated with the other three. Of course everyone on the train was keeping quiet because the three were being so loud that it was nearly impossible to converse with out being louder than the offenders.

    15 minutes or so into the Italy discussion a cell phone rings. The would-be Londoner explains "ohh it's my MOW - buy-ul" The other two giggle. She is literally yelling into the phone that she and her friends will be there in a half hour or so and that the person on the other end should wait up for them. "oh, oh - we're about to go underground so i'm going to lose you"

    The conversation then turns to clubs, bars, and boys. The "likes" begin to flow like Bass. The three of us resort to staring at them across our suitcases. They don't get it. They saw us get on at the airport and think we're just weary eyed, sleep deprived Brits unannoyed by their transgressions.

    We're now approaching an hour into the trip and finally my friend (who has a sick South Jersey accent - it's Jersey all the way but it has that certain Philly touch to it) gives it her best shot and belts out "Yo! *pause/uncomfortable silence* what the f*** is wrong with you? You're in a confined public space. Shut up!"

    complete silence - for the two visitors it's deafening and they seem to realize their mistake. The "local" doesn't get it. The offensive three turn to shoegazing.

    I was waiting for applause as often happens under similar circumstances stateside. The look of our local passengers was more one of shock and awe that someone would actually be that confrontational with a total stranger and that it was one american scolding another. There were plenty of smiles and smirks to go around. Mostly from people who been on the train for the last half hour. Since we had already passed through Central London at that point we had lost nearly all of the original riders.

    The entourage disembarked a stop or two later, careful to "mind the gap" i'm sure and hopefully their friggin' volume as well.

    Unfortunately we still had a 1/2 hour to go.
    Indeed you can usually tell when the concepts of democracy and citizenship are weakening. There is an increase in the role of charity and in the worship of volunteerism. These represent the élite citizen's imitation of noblesse oblige; that is, of pretending to be aristocrats or oligarchs, as opposed to being citizens.

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 2
    Last post: 03 Aug 2009, 3:43 PM
  2. Hi, Stef (a French in UK)
    Introduce Yourself
    Replies: 6
    Last post: 24 Jan 2009, 11:11 PM
  3. I love the French Quarter!
    Cities and Places
    Replies: 8
    Last post: 15 Feb 2007, 6:35 PM
  4. Those crazy french
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 2
    Last post: 17 Mar 2004, 3:53 PM
  5. God Hates the French too
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 13
    Last post: 21 Aug 2003, 5:09 PM