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Poll results: How to fix a neighborhood

Voters
24. You may not vote on this poll
  • Rehab programs

    8 33.33%
  • Community watch

    1 4.17%
  • Other (explain below)

    7 29.17%
  • 100 gallons of Gas and a match

    12 50.00%
Multiple choice poll
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Thread: Why do we bother with planning and community development

  1. #26
    Cyburbian the north omaha star's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis
    Why do we bother with planning and community development? I just returned from looking at a property that the county is taking down. That was the least of the problems on that block. The city that I live in does have some nice areas, but so much is such a ghetto slum now, that the neighbors are afraid to talk to the building inspector and myself. They are terrified that if some one finds out, they will jeopardy. It is to the point that much of this city is in such bad shape… I do not know if it is possible to rehab some of these neighborhoods. The only thing I can think of is level sections and start over.

    I know many of you share in my frustration. What has your city done when these neighborhoods get to the point when you can not comprehend people living in those conditions?
    Before the thoughts of 'giving up' come to you, come to Baltimore and see what I have to deal with. Baltimore City is almost exactly half tenants and half homeowners. Most of the tenants are dealing with absentee landlords.
    I am recognizing that the voice inside my head
    is urging me to be myself but never follow someone else
    Because opinions are like voices we all have a different kind". --Q-Tip

  2. #27
          jhboyle's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2005
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    Irwin, Pa
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    168
    Quote Originally posted by Jeff
    Philly is bulldozing most of the undesirable neighborhoods now. The city is actually attempting to get control of alot of the vacant/absentee owned properties through the use of windows.

    They recently passed an ordinance requireing all window panes to have, guess what? Windows. Not boards, sheet metal, etc. It is anticipated that owners will be fined daily until compliance is met or the city will take control of the property and do as it sees fit with it.

    Thats a GREAT idea, I am passing that one along to all of my fellow planners and ED people.

  3. #28
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    I was looking for a different topic under search and found this old thread - posting it as a bump because the poll made me spit up my lunch laughing - omg

    okay,I'll be serious as I do have a very important question...

  4. #29
    Cyburbian mgk920's avatar
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    Most of this thread was posted before I was caught into the Cyburbialand vortex, but I will comment that on the prior page, the commentary about immigrants moving en-masse into a formerly moribund neighborhood area, even if their occupancies violate this or that zoning or other code, is NOT a bad thing - as long as the properties are maintained. Perhaps it would not be a bad idea to try to have the local pols adjust the zoning law to better accommodate their urban design tastes. Remember that MANY older neighborhood areas were developed in a time before zoning.

    Otherwise, if it is a neighborhood area in a fast decline with no noticeable interest in it, just a mass of buildings in a death-spiral of decay, I would have chosen #4 (seriously) in the poll - but I would also rent time on them to the various area fire departments for 'live burn' training and recoup at least some of the losses on clearing them out.

    Mike

  5. #30
    Quote Originally posted by mgk920 View post
    Most of this thread was posted before I was caught into the Cyburbialand vortex, but I will comment that on the prior page, the commentary about immigrants moving en-masse into a formerly moribund neighborhood area, even if their occupancies violate this or that zoning or other code, is NOT a bad thing - as long as the properties are maintained. Perhaps it would not be a bad idea to try to have the local pols adjust the zoning law to better accommodate their urban design tastes. Remember that MANY older neighborhood areas were developed in a time before zoning.

    Otherwise, if it is a neighborhood area in a fast decline with no noticeable interest in it, just a mass of buildings in a death-spiral of decay, I would have chosen #4 (seriously) in the poll - but I would also rent time on them to the various area fire departments for 'live burn' training and recoup at least some of the losses on clearing them out.

    Mike
    Thank you!

    I was going to say to some of the posters that no wonder your neighborhoods are in decline. Great urban policy.

  6. #31

    Well it looks like Detroit is Starting Over

    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post
    Why do we bother with planning and community development? I just returned from looking at a property that the county is taking down. That was the least of the problems on that block. The city that I live in does have some nice areas, but so much is such a ghetto slum now, that the neighbors are afraid to talk to the building inspector and myself. They are terrified that if some one finds out, they will jeopardy. It is to the point that much of this city is in such bad shape… I do not know if it is possible to rehab some of these neighborhoods. The only thing I can think of is level sections and start over.

    I know many of you share in my frustration. What has your city done when these neighborhoods get to the point when you can not comprehend people living in those conditions?
    Mike,
    I just happen to be in Detroit over this Thanksgiving vacation weekend as I do every year to be with this part of my family. They live on the east side by the Manoogian mansion right off Jefferson, so its a decent area and most of the lots in this 'sub' are filled with older houses. Even during the recession, there are not a lot of vacancies there.

    And then, the area is adjacent to lovely Indian Village with those beautiful mansions; also a very desirable area with low vacancy rate. As a planner I have always been amazed at the layout of Detroit. Within this same community I see swaths of land with one or two houses per block. Some of them are occupied and some of them are just waiting to be demolished. As far as not being able to comprehend people living in those conditions, as an outsider, it looks like there used to be a house on every lot and this mass vacancy problem happened through shifting demographics and neglect. Those people that are left are holding on; waiting to be included in the re-imagined community, so I hope.

    Well the auto industry, with those HUGE plants allover town is outta Detroit, so here we go again with the shifting demographics. But it feels like a good thing. Instead of working around dying-out neighborhoods, a whole new city can be imagined out of the sheer mass of developable land so close to the riverfront and city center. Re-imaging Detroit is the subject of books and all over the front page of the Metro Times and it might happen this time. It really is a planners dream and I'm looking forward to the phoenix that rises from those ashes.

    communitypassionate 1

  7. #32
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Nov 2010
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    Toronto
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    There has been a lot of talk about bringing farming back into the City of Detroit. While there may be soil contamination and security issues I think this speaks to the real point of planning. Sometimes we get caught up in the idea that planning is about managing growth, but it's not. It's about managing change. A planner’s job is to look at all the possibilities and make appropriate decisions so that tomorrow's inhabitants don't have to suffer from our short-sightedness. If a City or neighbourhood is shrinking in population planners either need to look at ways to bring new people in or manage the change so that the future smaller city can survive. This may mean consolidating the remaining population into some areas and using the abandoned areas for non-urban uses.

  8. #33
    Cyburbian ursus's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Howl View post
    Sometimes we get caught up in the idea that planning is about managing growth, but it's not. It's about managing change.
    I wanted to let you know that in my corner of the world here I just stood up and applauded you. Very well said, Howl.
    "...I would never try to tick Hink off. He kinda intimidates me. He's quite butch, you know." - Maister

  9. #34
    Cyburbian Rygor's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ursus View post
    I wanted to let you know that in my corner of the world here I just stood up and applauded you. Very well said, Howl.
    Amen.


    On another note, though, here is one of my gay friends' theories of how gentrification works:

    1. The lesbians buy cheap, ugly property and fix up the buildings.
    2. The 'mos start to move in and pretty it up, adding niceties and flourishes.
    3. The yuppies and DINKS see the now safe and trendy neighborhood and move in and add cupcake shops and yoga studios.
    4. Voila! Gentrified neighborhood.

    It's a simplified version but in some urban places it holds true!
    "When life gives you lemons, just say 'No thanks'." - Henry Rollins

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