Urban planning community | #theplannerlife

+ Reply to thread
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 82

Thread: el Guapo gets a bike

  1. #26
    Cyburbian Seabishop's avatar
    Registered
    Nov 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,834
    Thanks. Biking is the perfect workout for planners and other geography geeks because of the element of actually going somewhere. When I was a kid my bike rides got me intrested in the differences between neighborhoods. I can't do too much of it yet though because I'd be leaving my wife home with 2 very little ones while I have my fun.

  2. #27
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Somewhere between the mountains and the ocean.
    Posts
    16,973

    Re: Look Cleats

    Originally posted by BKM
    [B]

    I like my current Sidis from a fit standpoint (they are comfortable), but I'm about to give up on them. I have severe pronation (flat footedness) and they don't give enough support/I can't get them adjusted right. I'm gonna wreck my achilles tendon.
    [B]
    To help this, get a pair of ECCO shoes for your every day shoes. I worked at a shoe store for 3 years, and I have 4 pair of them now. They are not cheep, but they are one of the best quality shoes, and it is way cheeper than a trip to the foot doctor. Go to a higher end shoe store, like Tradehome Shoes, and ask to try them on.
    If you're not growing, you're dying. - Lou Holtz

  3. #28
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
    Registered
    Sep 2001
    Location
    skating on thin ice
    Posts
    6,960
    Seabishop wrote
    When I was a kid my bike rides got me intrested in the differences between neighborhoods
    when asked the question about your greatest accomplishment in job interviews I tend to say learning to ride a bike for this and a few other reasons.

    Michael S wrote
    barely a quarter mile from the house.
    Thats cool. Can you smell the epoxy curing?
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

  4. #29
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Cheese State
    Posts
    10,074
    Originally posted by donk
    Thats cool. Can you smell the epoxy curing?
    No, the moved the painting operation to Waterloo a couple years ago. Here's a picture of one being put together at the plant, though.

  5. #30
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Cheese State
    Posts
    10,074
    Ok, here's the picture. I've had a few tours.

  6. #31
    Nice mullet!

    I hope he built my bike! I bought an inexpensive Gary Fisher Wahoo mountain bike at the end of last season.
    "I'm a white male, age 18 to 49. Everyone listens to me, no matter how dumb my suggestions are."

    - Homer Simpson

  7. #32
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Cheese State
    Posts
    10,074
    Originally posted by Repo Man
    Nice mullet!
    Ha Ha! I never noticed that before. Maybe I don't want to use that photo in my economic development marketing!

  8. #33

    Registered
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Solano County, California
    Posts
    6,468
    Cool, Michael. The only thing made in the town (Fairfield) where I work is jelly beans and bad American lager (Budweiser).

  9. #34
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Cheese State
    Posts
    10,074
    Originally posted by BKM
    Cool, Michael. The only thing made in the town (Fairfield) where I work is jelly beans and bad American lager (Budweiser).
    This is a very el Guapo-friendly town. We make Trek bikes, guided missile circuitry, beer (best oatmeal stout I know) and hydraulic systems for Volvos.

  10. #35
    I considered a Bob trailer but the front and back panniers have a better feel -especially going down hill. Some extra weight in the front panniers is really stable. Ok from my last tour I learned a couple of things.

    1. I need waterproof panniers, plastic bags inside the panniers works but is to much clutter..

    2. Send all extras home! I found that sending things back home would help unload weight. film, clothes I don't need, etc...

    3. Having food sent to places along the way will be a must on my Norther Tier or TransAmerica tour.

    4. A better sleeping pad.

  11. #36
    Cyburbian Plus
    Registered
    Jun 2003
    Location
    curiosity
    Posts
    21,888
    would this be a good time to create new thread/w/poll
    for bicycle riders to vote on their favorite style/location of riding
    street - touring, commuting
    trail - single, rail-to-trail, levee

  12. #37
    Cyburbian Emeritus Chet's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    South Milwaukee
    Posts
    8,935
    I vote TREK too. I have their 7700, kind of a street / off road cross over, more desirable for street though. Its light enough, geared well, and comfortable.

  13. #38
    I vote TREK too
    They make a lot of nice bikes.

  14. #39
    Cyburbian Plus
    Registered
    Jun 2003
    Location
    curiosity
    Posts
    21,888
    don't most Police/Paramedics on bikes ride Trek's?

  15. #40
    Cyburbian el Guapo's avatar
    Registered
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Samsara
    Posts
    5,077

    el Guapo bought a bike: Sung to the tune of Jamie Got a Gun by Aerosmith.

    I took the day off from work today. I putzed around Lowes and the house and then went for a ride after the rain quit. I have been training for a club ride next weekend for about three months. Today I finaly rode the entire route. It is 22 miles of the worst hills in town. I was semi-pent when the ride was over, but I did it in 1:45 so I feel REAL good. That's 12.5mph in the "mountain stage."

    I won't be the fastest rider out there next weekend, but I'll finish for sure. Not too bad for a 2 pack a day smoker three years ago. To top it off I bought some new jeans today. The waist is 6 inches smaller than the pair I wore six months ago. Suprisingly my legs are still the same lenght.

    310 Road Miles in July.
    el Guapo is a former 20 year +/- urban planner (just like you) who thought becoming an attorney was a good life choice.

  16. #41
    El Guapo

    nice stats -true inspiration. 6 inches off the waist -you are STOKED!

  17. #42
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
    Registered
    Sep 2001
    Location
    skating on thin ice
    Posts
    6,960
    EG
    The waist is 6 inches smaller than the pair I wore six months ago
    Unfortunately you sent half of them to me. Good thing I don't pack my winter clothes away.

    Congrats and keep it fun.
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

  18. #43
    Cyburbian Jen's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    1,477
    Way to go!

    Six inches off the waist and legs like iron? Are you shaving the legs yet, want to show off that defined calf now dont' ya?

    Really you riders are inspiring me to get back in motion . I stopped riding my trek with the chubby cheeks seatwhen the kids got too heavy for the Burley trailer. Two kids w/ combined weight bout 60 lbs oh yeah I could feel the burn. Well the bike is hanging in the gayraj and the girls are scooting along on their mini treks w/ training wheels just above walking speed. Thus I have decided to take up inline skating! Got a set of wheels by Bauer and some protection for the ankles elbows and knees, and YES I can do this! Wheeee but I hafta work on braking!

  19. #44
    Member Wulf9's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    Near the Geysers
    Posts
    922
    My daily ride is a Brompton folder. It's not good for more than 5-10 miles but can fold small enough to fit in the car or in a suitcase for a plane flight.

  20. #45
    Corn Burning Fool giff57's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 1998
    Location
    On the Mother River
    Posts
    4,734
    Believe it or not, in 93 and 94 I rode 20-30 miles three or four times a week, with at least a 30 minute ride on other days. Got out of the habit because I didn't want to do grad school all stinky, and when I didn't have class my time was occupied with a four year old I was raising myself. I have an old Trek in the shed. I may have to dust it off and roaderize it.
    “As soon as public service ceases to be the chief business of the citizens, and they would rather serve with their money than with their persons, the State is not far from its fall”
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau

  21. #46
    Cyburbian Rem's avatar
    Registered
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NSW, Australia
    Posts
    1,530
    Originally posted by donk
    The only problem I have with look cleats is slipping on the floor of the gas station I refuel at on my 60 mile loop.
    EG I think you and the other guys may be talking about two different things. Don't try to match their stats if they are really riding Yamahas.

    There is some talk about touring options. Our state road authority organises an annual cycle tour each March(link) where luggage is carried ahead for you and meals and the like can be taken communally, if it suits. It may be a little crowded and slow for Cyburbians, judging by the discussion, but it is very popular with participants.

    Is cycling taken seriously or encouraged by North American road authorities?

  22. #47
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Cheese State
    Posts
    10,074
    Originally posted by Rem
    Is cycling taken seriously or encouraged by North American road authorities?
    If by "support" you mean not wanting to construct shoulders or sidewalks on bridges, and earmarking TEA enhancement money to partially fund highway construction, then our state "supports" bicycling. Fortunately, local governments are much more honest and truly supportive of cycling. Most of the bike lanes and trails that get constructed are done locally.

  23. #48
    Cyburbian Rem's avatar
    Registered
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NSW, Australia
    Posts
    1,530
    Originally posted by Michael Stumpf
    If by "support" you mean not wanting to construct shoulders or sidewalks on bridges, ...
    Our State Road Authority provides cycling lanes, usually the shoulder, on all new roads and rehab. projects. New urban freeways have quite extravagent facilities for cycles. This does create some discontinuous sections, but over time that will disappear.

    Local Government would probably build more cycle ways overall, but we tend to be criticised by the serious cycle users because most of our big projects tend to be recreational and mixed use (ie. with pedestrians) in character rather than the "head-down-bum-up" (our internal lexicon) variety cycle route.

  24. #49
    Cyburbian Jeff's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Mr. Cool Ice
    Posts
    4,163
    Originally posted by el Guapo
    My LBS is a Trek dealer. I was thinking this one: http://www.trekbikes.com/bikes/2003/road/1000.jsp

    It is all I can afford.
    Forgive me my dear friend I've been away, but before I read through the rest of this thread let me stop you in your tracks right now.

    First off, if you are going to buy a road bike...DO NOT .. repeat DO NOT buy anything with a drive train other than Shimano Ultegra or better. Trust me, anything less is junk, and once you get fitter, and start riding farther, I will guarantee you will be stuck 50 miles from your house with a bike that won't shift out of a 39x23. Sora drive trains need tuning and adjustments almost daily. Do not waste your money on this crap.

    Also, as far as Treks go, IMO if you aren't buying the USPS model, you are buying junk. That company sinks all their resources into building bikes for the USPS team and the rest of their production line is overlooked.

    Recommendation for a good starter bike: Since I don't think you're quite ready for an Orbea or Colnago, I would go with Giant. A solid American company with bikes of decent quality at all levels.

    Just remember, you get what you pay for in a bike. And bikes are expensive (I'm taking out a loan to get my next one). If you spend $500ish on a bike now, I can guarantee you will regret it in a few months. As you get fitter and fitter, you are going to expect better performance from your bike, and anything bought "off the rack" just isn't going to cut it.

    I'll go back and read the thread now, I'm sure this was all already discussed

  25. #50
    Cyburbian el Guapo's avatar
    Registered
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Samsara
    Posts
    5,077
    Mike,
    Going <$500 is not an option. See: house, wife wants to travel to overseas every 3 years, dog, kid in braces who need a musical instrument, retirement funds and volvo maintenance. If I wasn't dancing for Chipendales on the side I'd have no fun money at all. I think I'm just going to have to learn to live with a less than USPS quality bike. How about a used one? That is what I am thinking.
    el Guapo is a former 20 year +/- urban planner (just like you) who thought becoming an attorney was a good life choice.

+ Reply to thread
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 ... LastLast

More at Cyburbia

  1. Thank you El Guapo
    Cyburbia Issues and Help
    Replies: 12
    Last post: 18 Jul 2006, 6:29 PM
  2. Replies: 41
    Last post: 12 May 2004, 6:35 PM
  3. El Guapo, We Need You
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 14
    Last post: 18 Mar 2004, 2:03 PM
  4. What about this El Guapo
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 6
    Last post: 26 Nov 2003, 6:27 PM