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Thread: Buffalo, New York - Kaisertown [w/images]

  1. #1
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Buffalo, New York - Kaisertown



    Kaisertown, located on Buffalo's East Side, is a blue collar neighborhood that was developed between 1900 and 1915. Despite its name, Kaisertown is a predominantly Polish-American neighborhood. Let's check the place out ...


    This is Clinton Street, the main business strip of Kaisertown. Almost all the businesses are located in buildings styled after Buffalo's famous two-flat house, with the business located downstairs, and the business owners living above. Clinton is a classic streetcar strip; trolleys stopped running along the street in 1950.























    Kaisertown's housing stock is typical of Buffalo's East Side; small frame single family and two-flat houses on deep, narrow lots.









    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

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    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Some Kaisertown flavor.
















    Can't forget the little old Polish lady. Where's the babushka?

    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

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    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Meat raffle?

  4. #4
    What is the dark dome shaped building in the 13th pick down?

  5. #5
    Cyburbian bocian's avatar
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    I noticed that one picture had a brick street - how common is it in that neighborhood, and in Buffalo as a whole? The housing stock looks kind of "boring" and "uninspiring," but reminds me somewhat of practical Midwestern working-class quarters (Cleveland, Chicago, Indy) more than from the city that's located in New York State.
    Great photos !!!

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Originally posted by bocian
    ...more than from the city that's located in New York State.
    ...
    Buffalo is in New York State? Which one of the boroughs?

  7. #7
    Reminds me of some parts of Scranton-Wilkes Barre...

    The preponderance of frame structures in the business district seemingly indicates that the village really didn't achieve substantial economic growth, as frame structures typically are replaced by masonry (especially if there is a major conflagration).

    The village could also use some serious sign control. Hmm, I wonder if a "signage non-proliferation act" is possible anywhere?

    As usual, nice images, Dan.
    On pitching to Stan Musial:
    "Once he timed your fastball, your infielders were in jeopardy."
    Warren Spahn

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Rumpy Tunanator's avatar
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    -Dan, great picks of an area that still remains stable in the city, while other parts have gone to hell.

    -As for village, this is part of the city.

    -People often say Buffalo looks like a Mid-west city rather than a east-coast city, probally to the way it grew with the Great Lakes trade.
    A guy once told me, "Do not have any attachments, do not have anything in your life you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you spot the heat around the corner."


    Neil McCauley (Robert DeNiro): Heat 1995

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    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    http://www.topozone.com/map.asp?z=17...06&layer=DRG25

    The dome is St. Casimir's Roman Catholic Church. I didn't get close enough to take a picture, but there's more information at http://www.faithelevators.us/stcasimirs.html . There's two other Catholic churches in Kaisertown; St. Bernard's, and one with one of those really long, bloody names like "Most Holy Precious Blood of the Martyed Virgins."

    I don't know what a meat raffle is, but I would assume it's one of those things unique to Buffalo Polish/Catholic culture that I was never privy to; sort of like Chinese auctions and butter lambs.

    Brick roads aren't common in Buffalo, but they aren't all paved over, either. The vast majority of brick roads that weren't paved over are on the East Side and in South Buffalo.

    Buffalo has a fairly permissive sign code. High rise signs and freestanding sign clutter in general aren't allowed, but restrictions on wall signs are minimal, and there are no sign design requirements. Buffalo's sign regulations also allow old-school blinking-arrow type portable signs in the ROW; the only sign code in the US to permit this, AFAIK.

    The housing stock is typical of Buffalo's blue-collar east side; basic turn-of-the-century American vernacular. Boring, with most covered in vinyl siding and remodeled beyond recognition. Many early immigrants to Buffalo were German carpenters, and nearby North Tonawanda was at one time the largest lumber transshipment port in the United States; thus, the abundance of small frame "telescoping houses."
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

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    Cyburbian Rumpy Tunanator's avatar
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    Originally posted by Dan
    Many early immigrants to Buffalo were German carpenters, and nearby North Tonawanda was at one time the largest lumber transshipment port in the United States; thus, the abundance of small frame "telescoping houses."
    -Its another reason why there is a lot of fires happen on the east side, tinderbox houses really close to each other that go up in a flash. When a house is abandoned it becomes a prime target of arsonists.
    A guy once told me, "Do not have any attachments, do not have anything in your life you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you spot the heat around the corner."


    Neil McCauley (Robert DeNiro): Heat 1995

  11. #11
    Originally posted by bocian
    The housing stock... reminds me somewhat of practical Midwestern working-class quarters (Cleveland, Chicago, Indy) more than from the city that's located in New York State.
    Great photos !!!
    Actually the housing stock is very remeniscent of other cities in the Central & Western part of NY. Older neighborhoods in Syracuse, Rochester, &others in the Finger Lakes Region look very much like this neighborhood -- so much so that looking at these pictures made me a bit home sick.

    The connection between that part of the state & the Mid-west goes beyond the housing stock to people's way of life. When people ask where my accent is from they assume its Mid-west not Upstate NY.

  12. #12
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Originally posted by Dan
    The housing stock is typical....blue-collar...; basic turn-of-the-century American vernacular. Boring, with most covered in vinyl siding and remodeled beyond recognition
    I have seen this in many Chicago neighborhoods of the same age.

    The alum. and asphalt siding salesmen must have made a killing in these working-class wood frame neighborhoods across the country in the 1950s and 1960s.



    There are many streets in Chicago that resemble this picture of Dan's
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

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    Member steveanne's avatar
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    Originally posted by Dan


    Brick roads aren't common in Buffalo, but they aren't all paved over, either. The vast majority of brick roads that weren't paved over are on the East Side and in South Buffalo.

    Hey Dan,
    Isn't Niagara Falls Blvd. mostly brick? For some reason I thought it was.

  14. #14
    Cyburbian Rumpy Tunanator's avatar
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    It is only in the city from Kenmore Av to Main St.
    A guy once told me, "Do not have any attachments, do not have anything in your life you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you spot the heat around the corner."


    Neil McCauley (Robert DeNiro): Heat 1995

  15. #15
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Originally posted by steveanne
    Hey Dan,
    Isn't Niagara Falls Blvd. mostly brick? For some reason I thought it was.
    A bit of it is, in the city limits from Main Street to Kenmore Avenue. There are a few brick streets in North Buffalo and the West Side, but they're far more common on the East Side and in South Buffalo.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

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    I grew up on that brick part of Niagara Falls blvd. You will be pleased to know that it was recently refinished in brick, utilizing all of the original bricks plus some new ones. The new ones replaced broken ones, but you cannot tell the difference.

    Also, I now live on another brick street in Buffalo, Northrup, both Northrup and Niagara Falls blvd. run off of Main St. near the University of Buffalo. Other than that I know of no brick streets in North Buffalo, the rest are on the east side, or South Buffalo.

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    Cyburbian Rem's avatar
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    re: Meat Raffles

    Originally posted by Dan
    [url]I don't know what a meat raffle is, but I would assume it's one of those things unique to Buffalo Polish/Catholic culture that I was never privy to; sort of like Chinese auctions and butter lambs.
    Meat raffles are very common in Australia (if they are the same thing). Usually used by a community group, sporting club or charity to raise money. Also popular are chook (frozen chcken), seafood and vegetable raffles.

    A raffle is like a mini-lottery. You sell say 100 tickets at $1 each. The prize is drawn on the spot, when all tickets are sold and the "meat prize" (no Mike D it's usually a tray of meat - chops, steaks, sausages and the like, not what you are thinking) is given to the one winner drawn from a hat. They are quick and easy to run, any pub or club in Australia will have a raffle night at least once a week and the proceeds usually end up with a junior sports club or similar group.

    If you Google search Australian sites with 'Meat Raffle' you will get dozens of hits on clubs advertising their raffle nights. Here is one such link.

    I've never before thought that a meat raffle was in any way a cultural icon.

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