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Thread: Impact of world oil depletion

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    Impact of world oil depletion

    Presently, the World is heavily dependent on Oil as the only major source of Energy. Based on current rate of World's Energy consumption, Energy experts predicted that the Estimated Total World's Oil known Reserve would last for about 30-60 years. Before the wells of the Oil producing nations runs dry, every nation will be feverishly stockpiling the precious oil at a very early stage i.e. 10-20 years before depletion. With a drastic increase in the price of Oil, electrical lighting will become prohibitive.

    Currently, all buildings are design with the concept and/or basis of a total dependence on a steady supply of Electricity at current stable Utility prices.

    Obviously, these buildings are built to withstand beyond the Oil Depletion Dateline. The concept of using electrical lighting as the only form of lighting place building owners at the mercy of the Utility Company for the entire life span of the said building.

    It is the standard practice of the Power companies to pass on any Fuel Oil increases to the consumer and will be reflected in their Monthly Utility Bills.

    Correcting these design flaws takes a long time as there are numerous other considerations as all these buildings maybe occupied and/or in operations.
    From decision-making to feasibility study to concept design and the scale of Sunlight Lighting Retrofitting may require 5-10 years or more before a viable alternative energy usage program could be implemented and/or installed.

    Therefore, the World must take immediate steps in considering the use of an alternative and secondary energy source in all future buildings and homes.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Vancity's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by CS Kong View post
    Therefore, the World must take immediate steps in considering the use of an alternative and secondary energy source in all future buildings and homes.
    ... well, this didn't happen.

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Vancity View post
    ... well, this didn't happen.
    Yeah, but wouldn't it be kinda fun to start a 'dire future predictions' thread in 2014 and then everyone can have a big laugh at us in 2024 about how wrong we were?
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    I had a chance to see Paul Zane Pilzer speak about the progression of technology and this is one of the points he made. The world has been running out of oil for about 50 years now and the number of years the supply was going to last, ranged from 5 to 50 years. However, we are always finding new ways to extract the oil, to use the oil, and alternative to oil.

    Having said that, I think we need to stop our global dependence on oil by:
    Encouraging the production of alternative fuel vehicles (not just cars but all modes of transportation)
    Provide incentives to make existing buildings more energy efficient
    Provide incentive to make new buildings more energy efficient
    and Stop subsiding oil companies.
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  5. #5
    Cyburbian Vancity's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post
    I had a chance to see Paul Zane Pilzer speak about the progression of technology and this is one of the points he made. The world has been running out of oil for about 50 years now and the number of years the supply was going to last, ranged from 5 to 50 years. However, we are always finding new ways to extract the oil, to use the oil, and alternative to oil.
    At some point, it will take more energy to extract oil than the oil can produce. Having to dig deeper/go offshore/explore polar zones/etc.. well, that requires a lot of energy.. then there is the fact that the stuff we're getting is lower and lower quality. We may have oil for a long time to come.. but it's going to get expensive and possibly become not worth the trouble.. though I'm sure we will still go get in anyway .

    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    Yeah, but wouldn't it be kinda fun to start a 'dire future predictions' thread in 2014 and then everyone can have a big laugh at us in 2024 about how wrong we were?
    yes.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Vancity View post
    At some point, it will take more energy to extract oil than the oil can produce. Having to dig deeper/go offshore/explore polar zones/etc.. well, that requires a lot of energy.. then there is the fact that the stuff we're getting is lower and lower quality. We may have oil for a long time to come.. but it's going to get expensive and possibly become not worth the trouble.. though I'm sure we will still go get in anyway .
    I agree there will be a point when that happens. But the dooms day predictions of it being tomorrow are off base. But we need to start transitioning away from oil dependency now, because at some point, it will be too late.
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

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    Cyburbian Vancity's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post
    I agree there will be a point when that happens. But the dooms day predictions of it being tomorrow are off base. But we need to start transitioning away from oil dependency now, because at some point, it will be too late.
    We will read this in 15 years and laugh about our moves towards greater oil dependency.

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    Cyburbian dvdneal's avatar
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    I'll predict in the next say 10 years (or some other number puller from somewhere) that oil becomes so expensive that only the rich will drive cars. The rest of us will have to live in high density walkable cities. As the crash is happening everyone will turn to the planners and ask why we didn't plan for this. We'll all just shrug and say I told you so and point to this thread and other things as proof. Once all the cities are super high density all planners will dream of a day where everyone can own their own little lot and travel in independent vehicles. Stores will have large areas to temporarily place these vehicles and everyone will thing we're crazy for dream of place that no one would ever want to live in.
    I don't pretend to understand Brannigan's Law. I merely enforce it.

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    Cyburbian Doohickie's avatar
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    Actually, I made a deliberate effort to buy a car with a stick shift this year because I fully expect that by the time I replace this one, cars will no longer be available with sticks. They will be solely electric, or hybrids, or maybe a few holdover gas/diesel powered cars, but even those will have precisely controlled automatic transmissions in order to meet fuel economy and pollution abatement targets.

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    Cyburbian dvdneal's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Doohickie View post
    Actually, I made a deliberate effort to buy a car with a stick shift this year because I fully expect that by the time I replace this one, cars will no longer be available with sticks. They will be solely electric, or hybrids, or maybe a few holdover gas/diesel powered cars, but even those will have precisely controlled automatic transmissions in order to meet fuel economy and pollution abatement targets.
    I'm doing my best to screw up fuel numbers with my Mustang with the absolutely unnecessary V-8 and of course it's a stick. I also see stick shift as a great theft deterrent since so many people can't drive them anymore.
    I don't pretend to understand Brannigan's Law. I merely enforce it.

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    Cyburbian ColoGI's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Vancity View post
    At some point, it will take more energy to extract oil than the oil can produce. Having to dig deeper/go offshore/explore polar zones/etc.. well, that requires a lot of energy.. then there is the fact that the stuff we're getting is lower and lower quality.
    Indicators that we are getting desperate include willingness to kill hundreds of cetaceans just to explore for more oil, the ridiculous fracking boom where expensive wells using vast amounts of water last only a few years and leak CH4 and ozone precursors, China pledging to go coal free in some sectors by 2020 and installing more solar next year than the US has ever....and so on.

    The increasing impacts of environmental degradation, plus the pure monetary costs, will make us look like addicts by 2050 by angry people wondering how it got this way...
    -------
    Give a man a gun, and he can rob a bank. Give a man a bank, and he can rob the world.

  12. #12
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Yeah......

    Between North Dakota and all the other Fracking sources......we export more than we import of the black sticky for the first time in decades....{Rumpy please note the black sticky is oil in this case}

    http://www.wallstreetdaily.com/walls...OilExports.png
    Skilled Adoxographer

  13. #13
    Cyburbian Linda_D's avatar
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    Actually, there's quite a bit of alternative energy use going on already, which is why the supposed end of Oil gets pushed out further and further.

    Here in WNY, between the winds off Lakes Erie and Ontario and our hilly terrain, we are a good site for wind power, and commercial wind farms powered by huge turbines are sprouting up all over, including on the shores of Lake Erie south of Buffalo on the old Bethlehem Steel mill site. There are also several wind farms in the hills east of Buffalo in Wyoming county.

    Most of the controversy over fracking in the East involves using the process to get at natural gas, especially in the Marcellus shale formation in NY and PA and maybe elsewhere, not oil. Numerous businesses have converted their vehicle fleets over to natural gas. In much of Upstate NY, and especially in WNY where natural gas wells dot the rural landscape throughout the Southern Tier, natural gas is the preferred fuel for home heating, cooking, and hot water heating.

    Solar energy is also becoming feasible even here in the cold, snowy, cloudy Great Lakes area, at least on a part-time basis. The technology has improved 1000x since 1998, and the pace of technological improvements has been increasing exponentially. Components for solar applications has fallen in price while improving in quality, and it's become relatively easy to find contractors to install applications. Just look at the improvement in outdoor solar lighting in the last 5 or 6 years.
    If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich. -- John F. Kennedy, January 20, 1961

  14. #14
    Cyburbian Doohickie's avatar
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    On my recent vacation we drove from Buffalo to Albany via 20A and 20 and there are several clusters of windmills here and there across the state. We saw them in the old Bethlehem area too. My mom grew up in Lackawanna and they were definitely a Bethlehem Steel family; my grandfather and all my uncles worked for them at some point. I still have one uncle that still does (last I heard).

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