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Thread: city vs city 8: most depressing cities in ny nj ct tri state area

  1. #1

    city vs city 8: most depressing cities in ny nj ct tri state area

    which cities are the most depressing cities in the new york metropolitan tristate area?

    Is IT ... hartford,ct camden, nj trenton,nj bridgeport,ct newark, nj new haven,ct east orange, nj jersey city,nj atlantic city, nj waterbury, ct new york,ny new rochelle, ny irvington, nj or yonkers, nj.

    my personal opinion...
    1.camden,nj- extremely high violent and property crime rate dilapidated housing downtown one of the dirtiest cities ive been too. high poverty rate. the plus is that its right outside philadelphia (5 minutes) commute is easy. the city itself is a ghost town what else can i say it sucks.
    2.hartford, ct/new haven, ct- hartford has a higher murder rate than brooklyn, ny and 4x the murder rate of los angeles. hartford has high poverty and fading businesses gangs run the city literally... the mayor is a "former" gang member. what else can be said about hartford its a **** hole. new haven not as bad. new haven's downtown, east shore, and west side beautiful areas with high income. boarded up housing projects on outskirts of town and vacant colisseum downtown an eyesore though . new havens newhallville (uptown) notorious in connecticut as well as its hill section (southside) for crime and poverty. new haven has high infant mortality and poverty rates. nothing to do in either of these towns. you know these cities inside/out in a day. both cities were on the nations top ten list of poorest cities in country with new haven(1) and hartford(7) that was years ago though.
    3.trenton, nj- shell of a city with a high crime rate and little to do what can i say new jersey is one of the suckiest states in america there is a reason why they call it dirty jersey just get on I-95 headed to jersey and roll down a window ... it smells like the entire state laid a big fat stinker in your car. there are so many places jersey goes wrong, trenton as at the top of that list.
    4.atlantic city, nj- besides the casinos atlantic city has a high violent crime rate prostitution and drugs are a serious problem. hookers can be seen roaming freely at any time of day. some kid was shot in the head recently in a drug dispute. a city high in corruption and poverty. for gods sake can someone kill all the hookers.
    5.(2-way tie) bridgeport,ct jersey city,nj these cities were created in equal sh@tiness.do the math violence + drugs + boredom + corruption = cesspools.

    post your thoughts

  2. #2
    Cyburbian jmello's avatar
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    1. Camden, NJ
    2. Trenton, NJ
    3. Bridgeport, CT
    4. Hartford, CT
    5. Atlantic City, NJ
    6. New Haven, CT
    7. Newark, NJ

    Don't forget Willimantic and Norwich, CT

    Cities 5 through 7 have some redeeming qualities, i.e. pro-sports, prestigious university, casino nightlife.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian
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    you forgot Paterson

  4. #4

    oohh...shoot

    i knew i for got something... my memories of paterson are so bad ic hose to forget about the city entirely.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian
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    I actually like Hartford...Bridgeport, Waterbury, New Haven are all worse.

    Top 3 in the Tri State Area

    1. Bridgeport
    2. Newburgh, NY
    3. Newark, NJ

  6. #6
    Cyburbian jresta's avatar
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    Fyi

    Camden and Atlantic City aren't in the NY/NJ/CT tri-state area.

    They are in the NJ/PA/DE tri-state area.

    Personally i think places like Hartford, CT and Vineland, NJ are way more depressing than Camden or Newark because of their isolation.

    There's hope in Camden, there's entrepreneurialism, there's opportunity. The city may have a long road ahead of it but it's definitely not on the decline and that, to me, makes it not depressing.

    AC stopped being depressing when they announced the Borgata 5 years ago. I would never have thought about going to AC before. Now there's always something going on there that has nothing to do with gambling. People my age and younger are always talking about going or "just came back", especially this time of year.

    Newark has been on the rebound for at least the last 10 years. It's the next Jersey City and no one there really questions that. It's got cheap office space that's been pulling Manhattan firms for a while, an amazing housing stock, it's the center of a large and growing transit network (commuter rail, light rail, and PATH heavy rail) it's got one of the busiest airports in the country for international flights (5 miles from the downtown) and with far easier access to Manhattan than either LaGuardia or JFK. It also has a large and growing Rutgers campus downtown, it has always had a middle and upper middle class presence that is now growing by leaps and bounds, the gay and arts communities established their footholds a decade ago, and it's had an immigrant presence that has never abated. Just by it's mere location geographically and it's mulitple rail connections to Manhattan, Jersey City, Hoboken, the airport, the rest of the NJ suburbs - and the fact that it's home to the largest and busiest port complex on the east coast - automatically takes it of the leagues of a Patterson or some declining old port town on the LI Sound.
    Indeed you can usually tell when the concepts of democracy and citizenship are weakening. There is an increase in the role of charity and in the worship of volunteerism. These represent the élite citizen's imitation of noblesse oblige; that is, of pretending to be aristocrats or oligarchs, as opposed to being citizens.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by jresta
    Camden and Atlantic City aren't in the NY/NJ/CT tri-state area.
    I vote for Buffalo, Rochester, and the Andorandacks!

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Rumpy Tunanator's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner
    I vote for Buffalo, Rochester, and the Andorandacks!
    I voted for Detroit.
    A guy once told me, "Do not have any attachments, do not have anything in your life you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you spot the heat around the corner."


    Neil McCauley (Robert DeNiro): Heat 1995

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner
    I vote for Buffalo, Rochester, and the Andorandacks!
    The WHAT? What city is "Andorandacks"?

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally posted by Mud Princess
    The WHAT? What city is "Andorandacks"?

    It's the one just north of Gothamopolis.

  11. #11
    Cyburbian boilerplater's avatar
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    What useful purpose is this thread supposed to serve, slamming the places that many people call home? What kind of contribution do you intend to make? What Elysian Fields are you so blessed to reside in?

    I find Toll Brothers developments and shopping malls to be depressing, but that's just me.
    Adrift in a sea of beige

  12. #12
    Cyburbian Seabishop's avatar
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    Sorry, Hartford and New Haven are no where near Camden. Camden is a hallowed out shell of a city and one of the worst examples of urban decay in the country. Hartford and New Haven have their problems but you can't make that comparison based on Hartford's murder rate. New Haven especially is coming along and has some of the best urban architecture in the country. Both cities were urban renewal happy in the 60's but those mistakes can be undone in time. Hartford has high crime but its also got vitality in its poor areas - lots of small businesses started up by NYC refugees. I don't think Camden has that sort of activity. Over the past few years Norwich has partially revived downtown, restored mills and has become less of an odd backwater.

    Bridgeport, on the other hand, is more of the real deal when it comes to urban decay. All of the cultural things that make a depressed city rebound are happening 20 minutes away in New Haven leaving little room for improvement. Its wealthy neighbors already offer small city amenities. Its only saving grace in the future seems to be its relative affordability.

    By the way these threads are a bad idea and turn into virtual fistfights pretty quickly.

  13. #13
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    If Detroit was stuck into the tri-state sprawl, I'd be depressed too. At least we have fancy suburbs to drive through!

  14. #14
    Cyburbian boilerplater's avatar
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    Well, here's someone who finds the vacant shells of Trenton to be worth capturing in art. Even more surprising, she grew up in Santa Barbara and got sick of all the happy people and nice scenery. http://www.packetonline.com/site/myz...d=343157&rfi=6

    I'm in one of my rare aggressive moods and I'm up for a virtual fistfight, but I know the mods here frown on that sort of thing.
    Adrift in a sea of beige

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    Wow uh some real critical thinking going on here...

  16. #16
    Cyburbian jresta's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by boilerplater
    Well, here's someone who finds the vacant shells of Trenton to be worth capturing in art. Even more surprising, she grew up in Santa Barbara and got sick of all the happy people and nice scenery. http://www.packetonline.com/site/myz...d=343157&rfi=6

    Wow. Are people from California aware of their repuation on the east coast (and beyond)? With ambassadors like this how can you blame us?
    Indeed you can usually tell when the concepts of democracy and citizenship are weakening. There is an increase in the role of charity and in the worship of volunteerism. These represent the élite citizen's imitation of noblesse oblige; that is, of pretending to be aristocrats or oligarchs, as opposed to being citizens.

  17. #17
    Cyburbian boilerplater's avatar
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    Umberto Eco called Southern California "...a place isolated from the rest of the world...where you are condemned to be happy"
    I wish I could remember where I read that. Maybe it was here. It sounds like something bibliophile BKM would post.

    I've seen the piece shown in the article with the artist standing alongside. Its pretty cool and I'd recommend it for anyone who has $7500 to invest. I think that was the asking price. Hey, bronze is expensive. I think a sculpture like this has investment value, in addition to its artistic merit, due to its uniqueness. But that's just conjecture by a person with little real knowledge of the art market.
    Adrift in a sea of beige

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    jresta: People like this Santa Barbara lady in no way represent the everyday reality of California-even Santa Barbara, any more than the silliness of $100,000 garden installations in the Hamptons profiled in the New York Times House and Garden section.

    Reading the Times regularly, I find it amusing that anyone from the East would dismiss Californians as silly, self-obsessed, etc. Nobody on earth is more provincial than the Manhattanite of a certain class and sensibility. "OOH. I dress in black and arrange dumpster leavings in still-life tableaux. I am so superior to the rest of you."

    Sorry. Major pet peeve here-and I'm not even a native.

  19. #19
    Cyburbian jresta's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by BKM
    jresta: People like this Santa Barbara lady in no way represent the everyday reality of California-even Santa Barbara, any more than the silliness of $100,000 garden installations in the Hamptons profiled in the New York Times House and Garden section.

    Reading the Times regularly, I find it amusing that anyone from the East would dismiss Californians as silly, self-obsessed, etc. Nobody on earth is more provincial than the Manhattanite of a certain class and sensibility. "OOH. I dress in black and arrange dumpster leavings in still-life tableaux. I am so superior to the rest of you."

    Sorry. Major pet peeve here-and I'm not even a native.
    I'm not talking about snobbery among elites and i'm certainly not saying that Manhattanites don't think they're the center of the universe (People from Philly are all too aware of that). I'm not even talking about art.

    I'm just talking about relating to someone else as a human being - average joe to average joe. It's a cultural difference that, to me, east coast born and raised (and when i mean the east coast i don't mean it as a euphemism for new york - i mean Maine to Georgia), is very apparent in that article.
    Indeed you can usually tell when the concepts of democracy and citizenship are weakening. There is an increase in the role of charity and in the worship of volunteerism. These represent the élite citizen's imitation of noblesse oblige; that is, of pretending to be aristocrats or oligarchs, as opposed to being citizens.

  20. #20
         
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    I don't think Hartford and Camden are anywhere near in the same situation. Hartford is on the upswing with a new Convention Center & Marriott Hotel complex as well as a new 450 foot residential tower downtown.


  21. #21
    Cyburbian jresta's avatar
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    This all very subjective to begin with but the title isn't "the most economically depressed city" for which you certainly could make a convincing argument.

    The title is "the most depressing cities" in the greater NYC metro (the author of which seems to have crafted the title around the cities he had in mind). I've already posted some criteria on what makes a city depressing to me. In that regard there are a lot of places I find way more depressing than Camden. I can say that because I know the place well and I can compare it to these other towns because I've also been to them.

    Sure Hartford has a decent skyline, as well it should, it's the state capitol. It's also not across the river from the second biggest city on the east coast. It also doesn't have the industrial heritage of Camden. Hartford may well be a great place to live. I've been there a few times, downtown and to the suburbs, and I've decided it's a place i could never live. Camden, on the other hand, is something i've been thinking seriously about.
    Indeed you can usually tell when the concepts of democracy and citizenship are weakening. There is an increase in the role of charity and in the worship of volunteerism. These represent the élite citizen's imitation of noblesse oblige; that is, of pretending to be aristocrats or oligarchs, as opposed to being citizens.

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