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Thread: What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

  1. #51
    Cyburbian Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    My fave high school forced to read it book was Alas Babylon about a town in FL after a nuclear war. Dated now, but horrifying back then.

    I'm now reading the Lemony Snicket series about the Baudeliere orphans.

  2. #52
    Cyburbian Hceux's avatar
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    To take a break from a heavy week of school, I decided to take up a cool reading break by drooling at the beautiful pictures in "Hip Hotels in USA" by Thames and Hudson.

    Oh, cool, there's a wigwam hotel in Arizona....oh, there's a ultra-super-luper modern hotel twisted with 70s taste in Downtown LA (yep, you read that right...not at the beach or in OC)...sigh, boy do I wish I could stay in Chicago and check out the city...excuse me, gotta daydream about travel journeys...

    Now, I'm back to earth - I just wish that there's an equivalent for those in Canada - after all, Canada is getting some raps for being cool, right? (Sorry, gotta being a lil' overly Canadian here as I'm Canadian)

  3. #53
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
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    Originally posted by BKM
    Neil Gaiman's last novel, American Gods, has a similar theme. The main character basically trapises around the rural parts of the United States with Odin. The interesting twist is that the "old gods" are battling the new "gods" (forces/powers/whatever) spawned by technology, the media, and the like. A somewhat weak ending, imo, but an interesting book overall.

    I'll have to check out his Sandman graphics novels, too.
    As I mentioned before , I can't stand gaiman. It seems like he is being weird just for the sake of being weird. The art work in the comics is grat, but the stories just seem "off "to me.

    Robbins can be weird for the sake of being weird, but somehow tempers it with misfits that are easy to identify with.

    Stopped reading "villa incognito" and picked up "About a Boy" and the new Lance Armstrong book.

    Please don't laugh at me for "about a boy", "high fidelity" and "how to be good" where really good stories.
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

  4. #54
    Cyburbian nerudite's avatar
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    Why would someone make fun of you for High Fidelty? That was an awesome book... I really like the book more than the movie, although some of the english slang was difficult if I recall correctly.

    After watching Band of Brothers on dvd a few times (my god, it's probably the best war movie/series I've ever seen), I have been really interested in D-Day and the fighting in ETO. So I picked up some Ambrose books from the library yesterday and I started reading Citizen Soldiers last night. I had a hard time putting it down.... it's awesome. I can't wait to read some of his other books!

  5. #55
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
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    Originally posted by nerudite
    Why would someone make fun of you for High Fidelty? That was an awesome book...
    it is more the other two. Most of my friends are not readers so they see movie titles only on my bookshelves.

    I'll share teh warning here I gave in the NEBT.

    The new armstrong book is crap. enough said.

    Will sit down tonight and start reading a stack of will eisner graphic novelsI just picked up.
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

  6. #56
    Cyburbian Plus JNA's avatar
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    ?Has anybody read any or all of Patrick O'Brian's
    The Aubrey/Maturin Series?

    before you see the movie?
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  7. #57
    Solaris
    by Stanisaw Lem

    I haven't read a scifi book in a while, I'm told this book will not disappoint!

  8. #58
    Cyburbian JNL's avatar
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    Hey TIO, I would be interested to hear what you think of Solaris, had it recommended to me recently.

    Just finished 'The Bride Stripped Bare' - Anonymous.

    I'm currently browsing 'SafeScapes - Creating Safer, More Livable Communities Through Planning & Design'.

    Going to try to pick up a copy of 'Love's executioner and other tales of psychotherapy' by Irvin D Yalom this week. I've heard it's similar to 'The man who loved a polar bear and other psychotherapist's tales' which I really enjoyed.

  9. #59
    Hey TIO, I would be interested to hear what you think of Solaris, had it recommended to me recently.
    I'll pm you with my review, just as soon as I'm done.

  10. #60
    maudit anglais
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    Originally posted by nerudite
    After watching Band of Brothers on dvd a few times (my god, it's probably the best war movie/series I've ever seen), I have been really interested in D-Day and the fighting in ETO. So I picked up some Ambrose books from the library yesterday and I started reading Citizen Soldiers last night. I had a hard time putting it down.... it's awesome. I can't wait to read some of his other books!
    His books are good...I've enjoyed reading BoB, Citizen Soldiers, and D-Day. Got the BoB DVD box set too...

    Currently reading the latest issue of Granta, entitled "This Overheating World".

  11. #61
    Cyburbian Hceux's avatar
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    Still reading in the new year!

    Now, I'm reading on "The Mercantile-Industrial Transition in the Metals Towns of Pictou County, 1857-1931" by L.D. McCann for my Historical-Geographical Perspectives on the Modern City course...

    Also reading "Social Geographies" by Gill Valentine, "Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World 1890-1940" by George Clauncey, and "The House of Difference: Cultural Politics and National Identity in Canada" by Eva Mackey for other classes.

    Is anybody else reading lots these days?

  12. #62
    Cyburbian nerudite's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Tranplanner
    His books are good...I've enjoyed reading BoB, Citizen Soldiers, and D-Day. Got the BoB DVD box set too...
    Sweet... I would love to have the DVDs. I'm reading BoB right now as a matter of fact. It focuses on a lot of different things than the tv series, so its kind of cool. It is a little slow-going because I'm a map freak and I have to look up every village, river, mountain range, etc. on my atlas.

  13. #63
    Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator NHPlanner's avatar
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    Trojan Odyssey by Clive Cussler....almost done....
    "Growth is inevitable and desirable, but destruction of community character is not. The question is not whether your part of the world is going to change. The question is how." -- Edward T. McMahon, The Conservation Fund

  14. #64
    Cyburbian ludes98's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by NHPlanner
    Trojan Odyssey by Clive Cussler....almost done....
    OOOO nice. Almost picked it up over the weekend, but no time for personal reading in the immediate future. PM me with a review.

  15. #65
    Cyburbian Plus JNA's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by NHPlanner
    Trojan Odyssey by Clive Cussler....
    Finished reading it - nice quick enjoyable read.

    Sister gave me for Christmas reprint of the 1948 Cheaper by the Dozen
    by Frank Gilbreth and Ernestine Gilbreth Carey.
    and 7 other books.
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  16. #66
    Cyburbian SlaveToTheGrind's avatar
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    Just finished The Killer Angels by Michael Shaara

    Now reading For Cause and Comrades, Why Men Fought the Civil War, by James McPherson

  17. #67
    Cyburbian JNL's avatar
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    Currently reading 'The Commodore' in the Horatio Hornblower series by C.S. Forester - very entertaining.

    Also reading the course readings for a local university course in Environmental Criminology with the aim of learning a bit more about crime mapping.

    And a book on Neuro-Linguistic programming.

    Loved 'Love's executioner and other tales of psychotherapy' by Irvin D Yalom (I mentioned it above) - has inspired me to learn more about psychotherapy and start keeping a dream journal.

    Next is 'Brave New World'

    Yup, I'm reading lots at the moment!

  18. #68

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    Let' s see.

    Andrew Vachs: "Strega" A hard-to-describe ultra-noir "mystery" written by an eye-patch sporting New York Attorney who specializes in representing children who have been abused. There is nothing like the "Burke" novels I have ever read. Somewhat depressing, but gripping. I found a quality paperback with three of his novels on one of my walks in the City yesterday.

    Brian Stableford: Just finished "The Angel of Pain" about to start the thrid volume in the "Werewolves of London" trilogy, the Carnival of Destruction, -one of the most fascinating sci-fi/fantasy books I've ever read. The protagonists in Victorian England have been coopted by a race of "angels" who exist outside of the standard "material" universe and are using the humans to understand the universe. They (the angels) have awoken from a 10,000 year sleep, and they are confused. A fantastic speculation on the nature of the universe and reality-a little difficult to read at times, but the ideas remain fascinating. http://freespace.virgin.net/diri.gini/werewolv.htm

  19. #69
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    recently read:
    "The Actual" by Saul Bellow - very good novella
    "Timeline" by Micheal Crichton - pretty good but slowed down and dragged toward the end, had some good stuff about parallel universes, quantum computing, and archeology.
    "They All Fall Down" by Richard Cahan - a biography of Richard Nickel, a reluctant early architectural preservationist in Chicago. Very good story of a devoted man

    off and on reading:
    "The Simarillion(sp?)" by JRR Tolkein - cool for those that are into Tolkein Middle-Earth stuff

    currently fully reading:
    "Building Suburbia" by Dolores Hayden - good and insightful, but written more for the less-initiated, but still a good read with a slightly different perspective on the origins and delevopment of suburbia

    On deck:
    "Pelendra" by CS Lewis - cool sci-fi fantasy with a sprinkle of Catholic allegory
    Last edited by mendelman; 21 Jan 2004 at 12:46 PM.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

  20. #70
    JNL, I just finished Brave New World - it is an excellent book.

    Books currently being scanned through brain: Green Architecture by James Wines, Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse, and The Things They Carried by Tim O' Brien

    Recently read: Why Architecture Matters by Blair Kamin, The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran, and Suburban Nation, by Duany and co.

    Plan to read soon: Survivor by Chuck Palahniuk

  21. #71
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
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    I'm reading Phillip Jose Farmer's "Classic Short Stories (1954-1963), once I am done that I'll be onto "Blown" and "Flesh" by the same author.

    I am also rereading the Cerebus "telephone books" in sad anticipation of the last issue in March.

    As usual, books on ethics and religious thought are also being skimmed.

    Not really reading, but kind of of planning related, a really cool Frank Lloyd Wright pop up book.
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

  22. #72
    maudit anglais
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    Going through a bit of a dry patch reading-wise right now. Budget constraints are preventing me from buying any new books.

    Re-reading "Churchill's Generals", edited by John Keegan right now. Also have a copy of the Jan. 12/04 "New Yorker" magazine in the commuting bag - apparently there is a good article on SUV culture in there.

  23. #73
    Cyburbian Tom R's avatar
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    books

    A lot of good books mentioned; To Kill a Mockingbird, Alas Babylon. To these I would add On the Beach and Brave New World. Right now I'm reading A Tale of Two Cities. I'm trying to catch up on a few classics that I should have read in the past. I find Dickens somewhat difficult to keep interested in and in general to read. Sometimes I like to force myself. Recently I've read The Hunchback of Notre Dame (Hugo) and a collection of Mark Twain essays. I've made it a goal to read everything Mark Twain has written. He's becomming my favorite author. When I was young I read The Call of the Wild probably 7 or 8 times and later I read a lot of John Steinbeck and Hemmingway. One book everyone should read is The Jungle by Upton Sinclair.
    WALSTIB

  24. #74
    Cyburbian biscuit's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Tom R
    One book everyone should read is The Jungle by Upton Sinclair.
    Just not right before going out for a big steak dinner.

  25. #75
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Tom R
    I've made it a goal to read everything Mark Twain has written. He's becomming my favorite author.
    I did the same thing. It is a shame that some of his later work really varied in quality. A good deal of it has been published, but there are still a few works that are hard to find. Have "The Personal Reflections of Joan of Arc" or "The American Claimant" be printed recently? I managed to find old copies in secondhand book stores.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

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