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Thread: What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

  1. #826
    Cyburbian Queen B's avatar
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    Finally,

    I get to weigh in on this thread. I am not a big reader except for the constant stuff at work. So that would be why I am reading our new proposed Comp Plan. Half way there. God these things are boring!!!
    It is all a matter of perspective!!!

  2. #827
    Cyburbian KSharpe's avatar
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    I just starting reading "The Lovely Bones". I almost threw up during the rape and murder scene, but after I got through that its gotten pretty interesting.
    Do you want to pet my monkey?

  3. #828
    Cyburbian Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    I am having bestseller withdrawal. I can't reserve anything new at the library because I won't be here when it comes in. And I just won't spend the $$ for a short read, like Janet Evanovich, that I'll finish in a day. Sigh...

    Browsing thru now, came in last week, "1000 Places to See in the USA and Canada Before You Die". I think they gave short shrift to FL, there's lots more cool stuff than what's in the book. Probably everyone else would have the same story about their state...

  4. #829
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
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    Recent reads

    Old Mans War - John Scalzi - pretty good Heinleinian tyoe sci fi.

    Just started The Bedroom Secrets of the Master Chefs - Irvine Welsh

    and of course books and articles for school.
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

  5. #830
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    Eat, Pray Love - can't remember by whom, just bought it over the weekend for my book club meeting July 10th!

  6. #831
    Cyburbian MDGARD01's avatar
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    Blink
    by Malcom Gladwell

    Excellent Read

  7. #832
    Cyburbian Richmond Jake's avatar
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    The House of Mondavi; The Rise and Fall of an American Wine Dynasty by Julia Flynn Siller.
    Annoyingly insensitive

  8. #833
    Cyburbian Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by RichmondJake View post
    The House of Mondavi; The Rise and Fall of an American Wine Dynasty by Julia Flynn Siller.
    Big surprise.....

    For me, Mark Bittman's "Quick and Easy Recipes from the NY Times"

  9. #834
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by MDGARD01 View post
    Blink
    by Malcom Gladwell

    Excellent Read
    yes, my book club read this - I liked it but halfway through it felt repetitive, as in, okay, got it, thanks!

  10. #835
    Cyburbian Plan-it's avatar
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    Jeanette Winterson's "Lighthousekeeping"

    It is an excellent read if you like her style.
    Satellite City Enabler

  11. #836
    Cyburbian psylo's avatar
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    How Soccer Explains the World by Franklin Foer

  12. #837
    Cyburbian DrumLineKid's avatar
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    Started Gingrich's To Renew America. As much as I disagreed with his politics, he seems like a very bright man. I tried starting it before and ended up yelling at it too much, so I dropped it. I still want to read it though.

    Picked up a copy of Save Our Land, Save Our Towns by Hylton, 'sponsored' by Preservation Pennsylvania at a conference the other day. Lots of great ideas but fails to account for potential takings issues in any of his desire to force residence/development in cities. The conference did include a discussion on the economics of urban planning and the real value of open space, particularly ag land.

    DLK
    "There are people in every time and every land who want to stop history in its tracks. They fear the future, mistrust the present and invoke the security of a comfortable past which, in fact, never existed." RFK

  13. #838
    Have finished reading (that I mentioned before):
    • Soul Purpose by Nick Marsh - An excellent first book, and Nick, an internet friend, didn't have to bribe me to say it! Basically a science-fiction comedy, but watch out for the zombies.
    • Cider with Rosie by Laurie Lee - Interesting if only for seeing the way people used to live. One of my great grandparents grew up in the same village, about twenty, thirty years before Laurie Lee.
    Have put on hold (ditto):
    • Tarka the Otter by Henry Williamson
    • Jane Austen's six novels
    Also detoured to Sharp's Trafalgar by Bernard Cornwell - I've been watching the reruns of the first filmed series on UKTVHistory and decided I would finally see if I liked the books. I do like Bernard Cornwell's Dark Age and Medieval stuff, but have decided that Sharp is no good without Sean Bean in uniform My imagination is not quite up to the task of pretending

    I'm now on to Quicksilver by Neal Stephenson - a novel that charts the change from alchemy to science and logical thought - great so far.
    Glorious Technicolor, Breath-Taking CinemaScope and Stereophonic Sound!

  14. #839
    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    Just started The World Is Flat, by Thomas Friedman. Apparently it was on the best-seller list awhile ago, but somehow I missed it... and it was always checked out of my local library. I think it will be a very interesting read.

  15. #840
    Cyburbian Flying Monkeys's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Journeymouse View post
    Also detoured to Sharp's Trafalgar by Bernard Cornwell - I've been watching the reruns of the first filmed series on UKTVHistory and decided I would finally see if I liked the books. I do like Bernard Cornwell's Dark Age and Medieval stuff, but have decided that Sharp is no good without Sean Bean in uniform
    I read Cornwell's Civil War series, it was really enjoyable.

    I have been reading 'A Dangerous Fortune' by Ken Follet, one of my favorite authors. It is allways neat when you find a book by a favorite author that you had not previously read.
    What’s in a name? – Your reputation….:)

  16. #841
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    I'm reading the 'Lord of the Rings' trilogy by J.R.R. Tolkien....for about the sixth time.
    Are apologies owed for doing this, when there are so many thousands of books out there that I have yet to read for the first time?
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  17. #842
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Over the baby vacation week, I stopped by the library and picked up:

    Lots of Parking by Jakle & Sculle - a history of parking/parking lots and their impact on the built environment

    Guns, Germs, & Steel by Jared Diamond - a history of why some civilizations domimated and others didn't

    The High Cost of Free Parking by Donald Shoup - an analysis of impacts and problems with requiring so much parking in the US

    Started with Lots of Parking and hopefully will be able to get substantively into the other two.
    Last edited by mendelman; 02 Jul 2007 at 1:43 PM.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

  18. #843
    BANNED
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    Taliesin Fellow

    Architect's book examines sprawl

    http://www.azcentral.com/community/s...aback03Z8.html

    http://search.yahoo.com/search?p=Swa...p=mss&ei=UTF-8

    Swaback doesn't adhere to New Urbanism
    Kate Nolan
    The Arizona Republic
    Jan. 3, 2006 12:00 AM

    SCOTTSDALE - For the past 20 months architect Vernon Swaback has spent many hours addressing controversial problems at the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, which operates Taliesin West, the architecture center Wright started in the 1930s.

    The founder of Swaback Partners, a Scottsdale planning and architecture firm with 45 employees and commissions around the country, Swaback trained with Wright and in 2004 stepped in to head the foundation's board as it debated its future, often feverishly.

    At the same time, Swaback was writing a book that considers even more crucial concerns about the future.

    Designing With Nature, Swaback's fourth book, is a treatise on the ...


    https://www.goshen.edu/news/pressarc...back-folo.html
    Last edited by bud; 03 Jul 2007 at 11:13 AM. Reason: add link

  19. #844
         
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    I finished The Pueblo Revolt by David Roberts last night. He writes mostly about the American Southwest and West. This book covers the revolt of 1680 when the local Pueblo Indians killed or expelled the Spanish from New Mexico and parts of current day Arizona. The Spanish returned 12 years later to re-colonize the region.

    Most of what is known about this period was recorded by the Spanish. Robert tries to get the other side of the story. The Pueblo’s version of events are either lost to history or kept secret by the Pueblo’s current elders. Roberts loves to find that exact physical spot where history was made no matter how remote it may be. In this study he is often blocked by the Pueblos’ current leadership and control of their sacred sites. Roberts is frustrated by their reluctance to allow outsiders into their sites but he does not resent their actions because he understands their history with both invaders and those who wish to expose or profit from their culture. This book did give me a better understanding of the culture and history of the Pueblos that dot New Mexico.

  20. #845
    Cyburbian Hceux's avatar
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    I'm currently reading "Rich by Thirty: A Young Adult's Guide to Financial Success" by Lesley Scorgie. It's nice to read a book that actually uses Canadian financial information.

    Has anyone else read this? It seem to be a good book to introduce one to having financial successes with investing in the market (stocks, T-bills, GICs, mutual funds, etc.) FYI, the book doesn't talk about investing in real estate properties, antiques, etc.

  21. #846
    "The Little Drummer Girl" by John le Carre is sitting in le Car (), though I never wind up with enough time to read it. (Stoplights are just too short! )

  22. #847
    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    I just picked up a new biography of Henry Hudson at our local library. Apparently, little is known about this famous explorer; in fact, it's not even clear where and how he died. The author used Hudson's journals and visited many of the places where he is supposed to have been.

  23. #848
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    This weekend I finished two books I had been working on for a few weeks.

    The Essential Ian McHarg, which, I think goes without saying, was great.
    Also Oh, the Things I Know, by Al Franken, which was funny and a quick read.

    I prefer to read something substantial, then clear the palate with something lighter.

    Right now I am finishing Me Talk Pretty Some Day, by David Sedaris, which won the Thurber Prize for American Humor. He is one of my favorite contemporary humorists. Started reading his stories in Esquire. Good stuff.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  24. #849
    Cyburbian Plus JNA's avatar
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    I was in B&N looking at "The Dangerous Book for Boys" by Iggulden.
    Pretty interesting collection of stuff you should either know or be aware of.

    Has anybody else looked at it or own it ?
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  25. #850
    Cyburbian Trail Nazi's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by JNA View post
    I was in B&N looking at "The Dangerous Book for Boys" by Iggulden.
    Pretty interesting collection of stuff you should either know or be aware of.

    Has anybody else looked at it or own it ?
    Yes, it is a cool book. The kids and I got it for Father's Day for Mr. TN. It has been really fun learning some interesting tidbits of information.

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