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Thread: What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

  1. #1251
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    This Bear will be purchasing a couple books, thanks to a nice Amazon Gift Card from my son and his family. Planning on.....

    New York
    Edward Rutherford

    The Power Broker
    Robert A. Caro

    Years ago I enjoyed Rutherfurd's historical novel Russka. His latest, just released last month, tells the tale of a number of New York families and their trials and tribulations as NYC morphed into the incredible place it is now. The book will be in the "James Michener Style", bringing historical accuracy to a sweeping novel.

    I have a fascination with Robert Moses......and the influence that he had on making New York City what it is today. I do understand that The Power Broker is old news, but......unless I hear of a better selection.....I have reason to believe it is an accurate account of Moses.

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  2. #1252
    Cyburbian dandy_warhol's avatar
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    Currently reading Sarah's Key by Tatiana de Rosnay. It is historical fiction that centers around the Vel' d'Hiv Roundup in Paris. The Vel' d'Hiv Roundup was a Nazi decreed raid but carried out by the French policeman. More than 130,000 Jewish citizens were rounded up and eventually sent to Auschwitz - few survived. The most disturbing aspect of this despicable act was the number of children (over 4,000) included, torn from their parents, and eventually sent straight to the gas chambers.
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

  3. #1253
    Cyburbian TexanOkie's avatar
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    The Planning Division at my city has begun reading The Traveler's Gift by Andy Andrews. And when I say we've begun reading it, I really mean they've all finished it and I'm only on the first gift/decision. I like it so far, but I just find it (generally, not the book itself) incredibly difficult to sit down and read. Once I read I enjoy it. It's just getting to that point.

  4. #1254
    Cyburbian Flying Monkeys's avatar
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    Just started "The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon" by David Grann. Starts out pretty good...
    What’s in a name? – Your reputation….:)

  5. #1255
    Cyburbian beach_bum's avatar
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    Reading Wrestling with Moses: How Jane Jacobs Took on NY's Master Builder and Transformed the American City by Anthony Flint

    Interesting so far. Definitely two different takes on how development should be done and the people development should benefit....

    If you have ever spent sometime in NYC and Long Island, this is a definite read!
    "Never invest in any idea you can't illustrate with a crayon." ~Peter Lynch

  6. #1256
    Cyburbian Masswich's avatar
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    Revolutionary Road, since I thought the movie clearly was edited for time. Yates writes about the alienation of the suburbs and how most people there seem to think that they are too good for the place. Its an interesting concept- that everyone thinks that other people like the suburbs but no one does. I don't happen to think its entirely true, but I know a lot of people "settle" for the suburbs when they don't want to.

    The main problem with the book is that the main characters are jerks. But I think that's kind of the point.

  7. #1257
    Cyburbian MacheteJames's avatar
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    Currently reading The Third Reich at War. It's excellent, probably the best history book I've ever read. Next up are Searching for Whitopia and Shop Class as Soulcraft.

  8. #1258
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    I just finished Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy. Yeah I know I am a little late to the party. It was enjoyable though and I am reading the next installment, Restaurant at the End of the Universe.
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  9. #1259
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by kjelsadek View post
    I just finished Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy. Yeah I know I am a little late to the party. It was enjoyable though and I am reading the next installment, Restaurant at the End of the Universe.
    My son is blazing through that collection right now. My brother bought him the entire series bound in one book. I loved them as an adolescent. Smart and funny.

    On another note, I just finished (it took me a day - a very fast read) X Saves the World: How Generation X Got the Shaft but Can Still Keep Everything from Sucking by Jeff Gordinier.

    Completely Awesome! For anyone who falls under the unfortunate (or fortunate - you may change your mind after reading the book) moniker of Generation X, this one is for us!

    1960ish to the mid 1970s is generally the timeframe for the GenXers' birth, but as the book points out, its less about when you were born and more about the attitude that one has. This book validated an entire encyclopedia of emotions, thoughts and disappointments I kept deep inside (ok, my wife and I talk about this stuff all the time, but its not exactly part of the national dialogue). I feel surprisingly liberated to know that my personal experience has been echoed by others, that maybe there is some salvation for our generation which the Boomers seemed to feel was so disappointing with our lack of commitment, fear of "joining," overflowing sense of irony and general cringing at anything resembling the 19060s change-the-world-through-mass-demonstrations paradigm.

    And the guy is gal dang hilarious. Seriously.
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  10. #1260
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by wahday View post
    My son is blazing through that collection right now. My brother bought him the entire series bound in one book. I loved them as an adolescent. Smart and funny.

    On another note, I just finished (it took me a day - a very fast read) X Saves the World: How Generation X Got the Shaft but Can Still Keep Everything from Sucking by Jeff Gordinier.

    Completely Awesome! For anyone who falls under the unfortunate (or fortunate - you may change your mind after reading the book) moniker of Generation X, this one is for us!

    1960ish to the mid 1970s is generally the timeframe for the GenXers' birth, but as the book points out, its less about when you were born and more about the attitude that one has. This book validated an entire encyclopedia of emotions, thoughts and disappointments I kept deep inside (ok, my wife and I talk about this stuff all the time, but its not exactly part of the national dialogue). I feel surprisingly liberated to know that my personal experience has been echoed by others, that maybe there is some salvation for our generation which the Boomers seemed to feel was so disappointing with our lack of commitment, fear of "joining," overflowing sense of irony and general cringing at anything resembling the 19060s change-the-world-through-mass-demonstrations paradigm.

    And the guy is gal dang hilarious. Seriously.
    A fellow Cyburbian sent me the collected works for pleasure reading since I spend so much time with academic reading.

    The one you just read sounds pretty interesting. Maybe in May when I get to read for pleasure again
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  11. #1261
    Cyburbian
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    Stealing MySpace: The Battle to Control the Most Popular Website in America
    http://www.amazon.com/Stealing-MySpa.../dp/1400066948

    Fascinating story of conman meets nerd meets every animated gif on the interweb.

  12. #1262
    Cyburbian fringe's avatar
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    Thomas Pynchon's "Inherent Vice".

    About as silly as Tom Robbins but a harder working stylist.

    Years ago I was dazzled by the prose of "Vineland", but put it down because the characters were a little too outlandish for me to care about.

  13. #1263
    Member
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    Just finished Six Frigates by Ian Toll. McCullough-esque narrative history of the founding and foundling U.S. Navy. Good for Hornblower fans; probably more fun for O'Brian fans as he quotes OB several times.

  14. #1264
    The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco. Amazing book! I like detective stories!

  15. #1265
    Cyburbian Plus Salmissra's avatar
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    Checked out Twilight and am 5 chapters into it. I wanted to see what the big fuss is all about. I'm still waiting. . .
    "We do not need any other Tutankhamun's tomb with all its treasures. We need context. We need understanding. We need knowledge of historical events to tie them together. We don't know much. Of course we know a lot, but it is context that's missing, not treasures." - Werner Herzog, in Archaeology, March/April 2011

  16. #1266
    Cyburbian PrahaSMC's avatar
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    Just finished Game Change by Heilemann and Halperin... as someone who loves politics/non-fiction, I thought it was a great read.

  17. #1267
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    Down the Asphalt Path by Clay McShane : Great history of the adoption of the qutomobile, Good complement to "Getting There" by Stephen Goddard

    Market Rebels by Hayagreeva Rao : Contains as good a refinement on Shumpeter's Creative Destruction as Breakthrough's repudiation of Maslow's "hierarchy".

  18. #1268
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Just finished another Gen X themed book called Slackonomics: Gneration X in the Age of Creative Destruction by Lisa Chamberlain. Pretty interesting stuff and a companion to the other book about Gen X I mentioned earlier (X Saves the World). Can you guess my theme of the month?

    http://slackonomics.com/
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  19. #1269
    Well I'm working my way, very slowly, through the 100 Essential Books of Planning list, and I'm in the middle of Bowling Alone. Interesting book, but a little bit of a dry read so its slow going. Has made me want to turn the TV off!
    Urban Milwaukee "Championing Urban Life In The Cream City"
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  20. #1270
    Cyburbian mike gurnee's avatar
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    I am going through my 40 year collection of the KY Historical Society journals, to read previously skipped articles that interest me now.

  21. #1271
    Cyburbian Plus JNA's avatar
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    The new John McPhee Silk Parachute
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  22. #1272
    Cyburbian Richmond Jake's avatar
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    Gator a-go-go by Tim Dorsey the last two afternoons by the pool.
    Annoyingly insensitive

  23. #1273
    Cyburbian WSU MUP Student's avatar
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    I just finished reading Chuck Klosterman's Fargo Rock City. It's his account of growing up in North Dakota and discovering hard rock music and his explanation of how that often maligned genre of music is greatly underrated.

    And now I am reading Our Band Could Be Your Life by Michael Azerad. While Fargo Rock City focused on mainstream glam rock and hair metal bands of the 1980s, this one is solely focused on the American indie rock scene from 1981 to 1991. It's basically a VH1 Behind the Music on 13 bands: Black Flag, The Minutemen, Mission of Burma, Hüsker Dü, Minor Threat, The Replacements, Butthold Surfers, Sonic Youth, Big Black, Fugazi, Mudhoney, Beat Happening, and Dinosaur Jr. So far it's very interesting and I like that there is more emphasis on the do-it-yourself aspects of the industry that these artists had to take on as opposed to the actual music... I've heard the music before and now it's time to discover how it got to me.
    "Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost." - 1980 Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan

  24. #1274
    Cyburbian fringe's avatar
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    David Foster Wallace's "Interviews with Hideous Men".

    According to the jacket blurbs was critically acclaimed.

    Wallace won a MacArthur "genius grant" a few yrs back.

    My take so far..............hmmmmmmmmmmm. As one who reads for prose style I am finding this guy's to be a little undisciplined.

    BTW, he hanged himself last year, another indication that the muses, if they happen to bless you with talent, are not necessarily kind to you.

  25. #1275
    Cyburbian Plus Salmissra's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Salmissra View post
    Checked out Twilight and am 5 chapters into it. I wanted to see what the big fuss is all about. I'm still waiting. . .
    OK, finished Twilight and am happy to report that I will not be reading the others in the series. The writing is not that great, but I can see how the storyline attracts the young (ie tween) readers, especially the female ones. Love, revenge, the need to fit in, general teen issues - all are in the book. I guess I'm just not that intrigued by it.

    I firmly believe that JK Rowling writes a better story, with wider appeal.
    "We do not need any other Tutankhamun's tomb with all its treasures. We need context. We need understanding. We need knowledge of historical events to tie them together. We don't know much. Of course we know a lot, but it is context that's missing, not treasures." - Werner Herzog, in Archaeology, March/April 2011

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