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Thread: What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

  1. #1376
    Member
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    Some for class, some for fun

    Fun:
    Climbing Mount Improbable by Richard Dawkins
    Me of Little Faith by Lewis Black
    Downsize This! by Michael Moore

    Class:
    Evidence and Procedures for Boundary Location
    Boundary Control and Legal Principles

  2. #1377
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Just started reading Cheap: The High Cost of Discount Culture by Ellen Ruppel Shell

  3. #1378
    maudit anglais
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    England's Last War Against France: Fighting Vichy 1940-1942 by Colin Smith. Excellent read on a little-known part of World War II.

  4. #1379
    Cyburbian fringe's avatar
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    CG Jung's lectures on Kundalini Yoga.

    Part of the Bollingen Series, so it is authentic, about a seminar given in Zurich in fall of '32, by Jung and an "Indianologist". Half the book is Introduction, and a tenth is Appendix. So scholarly the footnotes are footnoted to the appendix. Reads like a documentary on the production of a rock festival. Very good in its way.

  5. #1380
    Cyburbian RPfresh's avatar
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    Halfway through The Concrete Dragon, a 300-pager about urbanization in China. Hen hao

  6. #1381
    Cyburbian
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    Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Otherby Sherry Turkle

    Raises some interesting questions about our evolving relationships with our technology. If you're old enough to remember debates about the "humanity" of computers and robots ... read this book for an excellent update on how the "digital natives" are now framing that debate!

  7. #1382
    Cyburbian RPfresh's avatar
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    Got a few books lined up, if any of you are down to read/discuss them it'd be sick to get a little community going.

    Favela: Four Decades of Living on the Edge in Rio de Janeiro by Janice Perlman

    Arabic-Islamic Cities: Building and Planning Principles by Besim S. Hakim

    The Last Days of Old Beijing: Life in the Vanishing Backstreets of a City Transformed by Michael Meyer

    Anyone interested PM me. Look for upcoming review/discussion on the boards.

  8. #1383
    Planning related, not much since I just finished studying for the CEP exam...I'll pick something up planning related in the next couple of weeks. Non-planning related, Dean Koontz. I just finished book four of the Frankenstein series and am currently reading The Face while I am waiting on an opportunity to pick up book five of the Frankenstein series. It was due out on Tuesday but haven't had a chance to get it yet.
    A word to the wise ain't necessary. It's the stupid ones that need the advice.
    --Bill Cosby

  9. #1384
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    I have a pile of stuff on my shelf

    but the books I've been focusing on for the last week or so are Edward Glaeser's Triumph of the City and Alexandra Robbins' The Geeks Shall Inherit the Earth.

  10. #1385
    Cyburbian Plus
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    Work related -FEMA (IS 703) Independent Study - Resource Mangement in incident command

    Fun - James Hornfischer's Neptune Inferno - The U.S. Navy at Guadalcanal.

    There might a relationship thread there somewhere.
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  11. #1386
    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    I am finally getting around to reading Carl Hiassen's latest, Star Island.

    Hiassen is always entertaining!

  12. #1387
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. I had my doubts but that's because I'm not much of a reader of non-fiction, but it was fascinating. A mixture of science, medical ethics, the story of a poor African-American family in Baltimore over many decades, and the young writer who became obsessed with learning Henrietta's story. Henrietta died in 1951 and tissue from her tumor biopsy became the first ever cell line grown successfully in a lab but her family didn't know for decades that it was a huge commercial business.

  13. #1388
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Oliver Wiswell by Kenneth Roberts. It's a historical novel about a Loyalist during the Revolutionary War so it treats that time period from a different perspective. I had relatives on both sides of that war.

    Also working my way through a six volume set,The Library of Pioneering and Woodcraft by Ernest Thompson Seton, the founder of Boy Scouting in the United States. One of the volumes, Two Little Savages, has been a household staple for three generations in my family.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

  14. #1389
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    The Worst Hard Time by Timothy Egan. All about the environmental disaster that was the Dust Bowl in panhandle TX, OK, parts of Kansas and NM. Man, how depressing! But also fascinating and Egan is a good writer. Sort of a journalist turned prose writer. All the characters and stories are true, but he tells it more like a narrative.

    Consider: 80 million acres of sod (which had developed over about 20,000 years) turned for wheat production in about 5 years. Then the drought hit and it all blew away. And it was the Depression. People had nowhere to go and many were living in dugouts and dying of dust pneumonia. In some areas, not a single thing grew for up to 7 years - no blade of grass or leaf on a tree. One family subsisted for 2 years on pickled tumbleweed and yucca root. Later, the county sherrif started collecting dead livestock (many of which simply choked to death on dirt) and sold the useable meat. Most folks pickled that, too, as it was the only way to preserve it.

    If you think we have it hard now, this book will show you just how much deprivation people can take. A good read for natural resource planners.

    I thought about this book when I heard about Phoenix's dust storm yesterday...
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  15. #1390
    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by wahday View post
    The Worst Hard Time by Timothy Egan.
    I read that book a few months ago myself. Excellent.

  16. #1391
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    RJ and I just read "Lost in Shangri-La" by Mitchell Zuckoff, true story about the rescue of survivors of a military plane crash from a remote valley in New Guinea in WWII. Very interesting story, and one we'd never heard of before.

  17. #1392
    NIMBY asshatterer Plus Richmond Jake's avatar
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    Heading out to the pool to read Take Me Out to the Ballpark - An Illustrated Tour of Baseball Parks Past and Present by Josh Leventhall. I like books with lots of pictures.

  18. #1393
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    "The Big Roads: the Untold Story of the Engineers, Visionaries, and Trailblazers Who Created the American Superhighways" by Earl Swift. Written for the layperson, but also very interesting for planners. I learned a lot. It makes you wonder how the first motorists in the US ever managed to get anywhere.

  19. #1394
    Cyburbian ThePinkPlanner's avatar
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    I'm currently on the second book in the Outlander series, Dragonfly in Amber. The first was primarily a love story (though well-written with thorough character development), but the second is proving to be very interesting historical fiction (Scotland 1745).

  20. #1395
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    I'm reading The Glass Key, by Dashiell Hammett, This is the last of his novels I had not read. Supposedly his favorite.

    Also been reading The Fabulous Riverboat to my son. We should finish it tonight.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  21. #1396
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    "Turn Right at Machu Picchu: Rediscovering the Lost City One Step at a Time" by Mark Adams.

    NYC writer who had never does anything particularly adventurous decides to follow in the footsteps of Hiram Bingham's expedition that "discovered" Machu Picchu. Highly entertaining. Interweaves Adams's trip with Bingham's life and a bit of Inca history.

  22. #1397
    NIMBY asshatterer Plus Richmond Jake's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess View post
    "The Big Roads: the Untold Story of the Engineers, Visionaries, and Trailblazers Who Created the American Superhighways" by Earl Swift. Written for the layperson, but also very interesting for planners. I learned a lot. It makes you wonder how the first motorists in the US ever managed to get anywhere.
    I started this over last weekend. A good read. Highly recommended.

  23. #1398
    Cyburbian Plus Salmissra's avatar
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    "Ghost Story" by Jim Butcher. It's the latest in the Dresden Files. I'm about 1/2 way through, and it's great so far! I can't bring it to work - I did on Monday and got caught up and read for 2 hours!

    I also have Edward Glaeser's "Triumph of the City" lined up for a more work-related read. And it looks like "The Big Roads" gets two thumbs up, so I'll see if the library has it.
    "We do not need any other Tutankhamun's tomb with all its treasures. We need context. We need understanding. We need knowledge of historical events to tie them together. We don't know much. Of course we know a lot, but it is context that's missing, not treasures." - Werner Herzog, in Archaeology, March/April 2011

  24. #1399
    Cyburbian Plus Salmissra's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess View post
    RJ and I just read "Lost in Shangri-La" by Mitchell Zuckoff, true story about the rescue of survivors of a military plane crash from a remote valley in New Guinea in WWII. Very interesting story, and one we'd never heard of before.
    This author was on the Daily Show a while back. The book sounds fascinating.
    "We do not need any other Tutankhamun's tomb with all its treasures. We need context. We need understanding. We need knowledge of historical events to tie them together. We don't know much. Of course we know a lot, but it is context that's missing, not treasures." - Werner Herzog, in Archaeology, March/April 2011

  25. #1400
    Cyburbian Plus dandy_warhol's avatar
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    The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver

    I find her work very engaging and very easy to read.

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