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Thread: What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

  1. #1426
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Letters of Marcus Tullius Cicero by Cicero.

    The similarities between ancient Rome and modern United States are truly frightening. I hope we donít have the same end result.
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  2. #1427
    Cyburbian Plus dandy_warhol's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by dandy_warhol View post
    I picked up Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury today. Time to knock another classic off the list.
    Quote Originally posted by HomerJ9139 View post
    No one has ever agreed with me, but I preferred As I Lay Dying, we'll have to see if you're one of the few, or only
    Apparently I picked up and then put down The Sound and the Fury. When I got home I realized I had checked out Light in August instead. Oh well. It is also on the list.

    I'll let you know my thoughts on As I Lay Dying. I read Absalom! Absalom! a few years ago and remember being kind of confused as to what occurred. That seems to be happening a lot lately.

  3. #1428
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    "In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin" by Erik Larson.

    So far, the appointment of a thrifty college professor as Roosevelt's ambassador to Berlin in 1933, along with Hitler's ascension and the political sensitivities of the day.

  4. #1429
    Cyburbian ursus's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by dandy_warhol View post
    Apparently I picked up and then put down The Sound and the Fury. When I got home I realized I had checked out Light in August instead. Oh well. It is also on the list.

    I'll let you know my thoughts on As I Lay Dying. I read Absalom! Absalom! a few years ago and remember being kind of confused as to what occurred. That seems to be happening a lot lately.
    You can't give up on Faulkner. He's the greatest of them all, I read the first 200 pages of Absalom! Absalom!, finally realized what was going on and went back to the beginning. There are too many narrative voices going on, but once you're good at parsing them out from each other the stories are incredible. And HomerJ is wrong, As I Lay Dying is not the best, Light In August is.
    "...I would never try to tick Hink off. He kinda intimidates me. He's quite butch, you know." - Maister

  5. #1430
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    The Naked Now: Learning to See as the Mystics See by Richard Rohr

    It is for a church book club that I recently joined. They are finishing up the book this Saturday morning, so I am reading the whole thing to catch up.
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  6. #1431
    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
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    Just finished War by Sebastian Junger. I'd say it was one of the top 5 books I've ever read.

  7. #1432
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    I am reading, to my son, Puddinhead Wilson, one of Mark Twain's most overlooked works. Every bit as controversial as Huckleberry Finn in its use of the n-word, race relations and a study of nature vs nuture. Toss in dozens of witticism (Puddinhead Wilson's Calendar), switched babies, burglaries, a murder and a hero that everyone under-estimates, and you have a great read.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  8. #1433
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Serge is back!

    Tim Dorsey's "When Elves Attack". My favorite serial killer and his pal Coleman celebrate the holidays in Tampa, and the usual mayhem ensues.

  9. #1434
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    John Grisham's "The Litigators". His books always make me glad I never became an attorney as my dad hoped I would. Shudders.....

  10. #1435
    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    Just finished Eat, Sleep, Ride: How I Braved Bears, Badlands, and Big Breakfasts in My Quest to Cycle the Tour Divide. I had borrowed it from the library for my cycling-enthusiast spouse; after he was done, he said he thought that I would enjoy the book as well. And I did - you don't have to be a cyclist to enjoy British author Paul Howard's wit and humor (pardon me, that should be humour) as he rides through Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico, stopping in an assortment of towns along the way.

  11. #1436
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    This past week, it was Freedom Shift by Oliver DeMille. Great book about the historical shifts in the direction of a country once every 100 years (or so) and how for the first time in recorded history, we are about to embark on a global shift that will end real badly unless there is a substantial change in American society as many more of our freedoms will be taken. He also goes into detail on what needs to be done to stop the force shift and move it in the direction of a freedom shift.

    Without question, one of the best books that I have read in a while.
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  12. #1437
    Cyburbian Plus Whose Yur Planner's avatar
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    Reading Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. I saw all three of the movies and decided to start reading the books. It's pretty good so far, but the focus is different than in the movie.
    When did I go from Luke Skywalker to Obi-Wan Kenobi?

  13. #1438
    Cyburbian UrbaneSprawler's avatar
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    Reading the Steve Jobs biography, up to Chapter 17. Good read in that it seems to portray Jobs in a very honest light.

  14. #1439
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Just started Malcolm Gladwell's "Outliers" on the plane. Well, tried to - only got through the prologue. The Texan Wilford Brimley look alike that sat next to me really REALLY wanted to chat me up. Its not often that I fly alone and this was a rare opportunity for me. But he was an interesting guy and I got into the book last night, so its all good. Very interesting read.
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  15. #1440
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by wahday View post
    Just started Malcolm Gladwell's "Outliers" on the plane.
    That is an awesome book!
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  16. #1441
    Cyburbian Seabishop's avatar
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    I haven't kept up with this thread so here are the last several over the past year or so:

    Just got Andre Dubus II - Selected Short Stories
    Andre Dubus III - Townie
    Kafka - the Metamorphasis
    Jonathan Safran Foer - Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close
    Cormac McCarthy - The Road
    David Mitchell - Ghostwritten
    Joseph Braude - The Honored Dead
    David Mitchell - Cloud Atlas
    Joseph Heller - Catch 22 (hated it and quit partway)
    Charles C. Mann - 1491
    David Grann - Lost City of Z
    Tony Horwitz - A Voyage Long and Strange

  17. #1442
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    V is for Vengeance by Sue Grafton. Another in the Kinsey Milhone series and one I will pay for on Kindle, instead of waiting for a library copy.

    JNA, you see the new Anna P is out in January?

  18. #1443
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Think and Grow Rich. Napoleon Hill. It is amazing to me how many of the principles are still relevant today, but lost to most of America.
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  19. #1444
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    Kafka on the Shore

    I am reading Kafka on the Shore, by Haruki Murakami, which I am enjoying. It is an odd sort of book. There are several narrative threads running parallel in the story and my favorite is the simple-minded old man who can talk to cats and they and he understand each other.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  20. #1445
    I just finished The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach (baseball and Melville mixed together!)

    Now I'm starting The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides (Derrida and punk rock!)

  21. #1446
    Cyburbian Plus
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    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess View post
    JNA, you see the new Anna P is out in January?
    Yes indeed looking forward to it. Setting is Glen Canyon National Recreational Area.
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  22. #1447
    Cyburbian Plus dandy_warhol's avatar
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    Currently reading:

    V for Vendetta by Moore

    Light in August by Faulkner

    Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain


    recently finished:

    In the Sanctuary of Outcasts by Neil White - interesting story of Carville - the last leprosarium in the US that also doubles as a Louisiana State Prison.

  23. #1448
    Cyburbian Masswich's avatar
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    Rereading some old sci-fi favorites. I am inclined towards Arthur C Clarke, in part because his stories are often in the less-distant future and are slightly more realistic than many. For example, often interplanetary travel is still a big deal, and he generally didn't believe we'd get past the speed of light anytime in the next 10,000 years.

    Specific books I recommend for planners:

    Imperial Earth, in which I noticed this time around that people seemed to have iPhones/PDA's, a pretty visionary idea for something written in 1976.
    The Songs of Distant Earth, where a planet colonized a few hundred years ago is visited by another group on their way to colonize a more distant planet. Interesting ideas about how a society is planned from scratch

  24. #1449
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Another Stephanie Plum novel: Janet Evanovich's "Explosive Eighteen".

  25. #1450
    Cyburbian Plus Salmissra's avatar
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    Just finished New Amsterdam by Elizabeth Bear. Sci-fi in a slightly different American colonial era. For example, in 1902 New Amsterdam is a colony of the English, and war is breaking out. There are magicians (certified, trained, and ranked), vampyres, and gas lamps are a new thing. Interesting read, and provides a thought-provoking look at what could-have-been in the colonies in terms of politics.
    "We do not need any other Tutankhamun's tomb with all its treasures. We need context. We need understanding. We need knowledge of historical events to tie them together. We don't know much. Of course we know a lot, but it is context that's missing, not treasures." - Werner Herzog, in Archaeology, March/April 2011

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