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Thread: What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

  1. #1526
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ofos View post
    Just finished "Iberia" by James Michener. ...
    Shoulda called me. I just took all my Micheners, Trevanian, John D McDonald, novels I've hauled around for 30+ years, off to Goodwill. I had every Michener. Four big boxes. I had to do it.

    I still can't get rid of all the 1965 to 1975 fantasy and sci-FI. Too close to home.

  2. #1527
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess View post
    Shoulda called me. I just took all my Micheners, Trevanian, John D McDonald, novels I've hauled around for 30+ years, off to Goodwill. I had every Michener. Four big boxes. I had to do it.

    I still can't get rid of all the 1965 to 1975 fantasy and sci-FI. Too close to home.
    I think it was the only one that I hadn't read before. As much as I've always enjoyed Michener, his endings always seem to be the weakest part of his works. That goes for both the novels and the travels.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

  3. #1528
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    "Horse Heaven" by Jane Smiley. It's a novel taking place around the country and overseas about the thoroughbred horse racing world. A big book, lots of quirky characters, I'm assuming at some point they all converge. Maybe not. But a fun read so far.

  4. #1529
    NIMBY asshatterer Plus Richmond Jake's avatar
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    Baseball's Best Short Stories edited by Paul Staudohar. Most are entertaining and amusing but some are written in vernacular that I can't get my simple mind to appreciate. I skip through those stories.
    I think that one of the great signs of security is the ability to just walk away.

  5. #1530
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    "Shadow of Night" by Deborah Harkness. It's the sequel to "A Discovery of Witches".

  6. #1531
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    'The Three Musketeers'
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  7. #1532
    Cyburbian ursus's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    'The Three Musketeers'
    How is that? I mean as a written story? Never read it.
    "...I would never try to tick Hink off. He kinda intimidates me. He's quite butch, you know." - Maister

  8. #1533
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ursus View post
    How is that? I mean as a written story? Never read it.
    This feller called Alexandre Dumbass wrote himself a book about it, but they's actually four of these guys who hang out together, so I don't rightly unnerstand.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  9. #1534
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    This feller called Alexandre Dumbass wrote himself a book about it, but they's actually four of these guys who hang out together, so I don't rightly unnerstand.
    Yeah and that ain't the only thing misleading about the title. They call themselves "Musketeers" but mostly they sword fight. Kind of a bromance. And the guys are as manly as, you know, the French can be.

    But seriously, it isn't a bad book. Written 160 or so years ago, the writing tends to be flowery and melodramatic, but it is a ripping yarn.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  10. #1535
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    The Pulse

    Just finishing this sci-fi tech book about the devastating effect of a massive electromagnetic pulse wave that knock out all electronics. That would be a very quick way to drastically reduce the population of any and all developed nations. It also highlights how incredibly dependent we have become on technology and our lack of preparedness when we can no longer use our computers and smart phones. Well worth reading.

  11. #1536
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Today I read "Night Watch" by Linda Fairstein, one of my favorite authors. I got lucky on this one: i was contemplating downloading it to the kindle, but held off until I went to the library Thursday, and there it was! The protagonist is a special victims prosecutor in NYC.

    Yesterday's read: Carolyn Hart's "Death Comes Silently", the latest in the Annie and Max Darling mystery series set in South Carolina.

  12. #1537
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    I've been going through the Lisa Gardner books - I really like her - my Mom got me reading her a year ago as I never gravitated towards mystery thriller novels but I really like hers

  13. #1538
    Cyburbian Seabishop's avatar
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    Now: The Brief Wonderous Life of Oscar Wao - Junot Diaz. Nerdy teenage Dominican immigrant and his family. Good so far.

    Previously:

    Blueprints of the Afterlife - Ryan Boudinot. Some good ideas about a dystopian future but I really hated the way it was written.

    Crossbones - Nuruddin Farah. Novel about a journalist in Somalia. Despite the insteresting subject matter I didn't really like the story and would have preferred a non-fiction book about the country's problems.

  14. #1539
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    I just started Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand (who wrote Seabiscuit) and am really liking it. Its about the Pacific theater in WWII. She's a very compelling writer and it just skips right along.

    Just finished Mockingjay, the last in the Hunger Games trilogy. A very quick read. I don't know what to say about the series. I enjoyed it quite a bit on the one hand, but also found it rather disturbing on the other. Especially when I consider it was written by young adults. Pretty depraved stuff in that last one...
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  15. #1540
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by wahday View post
    I just started Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand (who wrote Seabiscuit) and am really liking it. Its about the Pacific theater in WWII. She's a very compelling writer and it just skips right along.
    I mostly read fiction,but I read Unbroken last year and, although there were some horrendous scenarios, I thought it was a great book. An interesting factoid: the author rarely leaves her home, so her research was done entirely via internet and phone.

  16. #1541
    Cyburbian UrbaneSprawler's avatar
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    I'd just offer that Hugh Howey's The Wool is the best sci fi I've read in a long time. The reviews online can't be wrong.

  17. #1542
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    Adriana Trigiani's "The Shoemaker's Wife". Two Italian teenagers meet in northern Italy in 1910, and for different reasons, end up in the NYC area. The boy is apprenticed to a shoemaker, the girl works in a clothing factory and lives with the distant relatives from hell. I'm about halfway thru the book, and enjoying it a lot, even though I'm not usually a big fan of historical fiction.

  18. #1543
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ursus View post
    How is that? I mean as a written story? Never read it.
    I gotta say, that for being a 160 year old tale it's held up remarkably well. The action just rolls along and Dumas very seldom seems to get bogged down with the laborious descriptions and exposition that's typical of literature from that era.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  19. #1544
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Finished reading the last of the four volumes of the Berrybender Narratives by Larry McMurtry. Next in line is "Redcoats and Rebels: The American Revolution Through British Eyes" by Christopher Hibbert.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

  20. #1545
    Cyburbian fringe's avatar
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    Joseph Campbell's "Myths to Live By", 1972, gleaned from lectures given at Cooper Union over a number of years.

    Most of his life's work in comparative lit organized the major traditions of the planet and showed them to be mostly location bound. Modern communication's rapidity has destroyed boundaries that kept the four main "domains" islolated. The selections in this volume attempt to make sense of a way forward in light of the provincialism that weights the main teachings like a sea anchor.

  21. #1546
    Cyburbian Random Traffic Guy's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Zpaiss View post
    Just finishing this sci-fi tech book about the devastating effect of a massive electromagnetic pulse wave that knock out all electronics. That would be a very quick way to drastically reduce the population of any and all developed nations. It also highlights how incredibly dependent we have become on technology and our lack of preparedness when we can no longer use our computers and smart phones. Well worth reading.
    Another good book in the same line is "One Second After" by William Forstchen. Very sobering stuff on hunger, medicine dependency, and how a small town could come together or fail. An EMP attack would probably not be as damaging to everyday electronics (cars, etc) as One Second After posits (I don't know the solar flares were treated in The Pulse), but damage to the grid would bring a cascading set of failures that would have a big secondary kill.

    Quote Originally posted by wahday View post
    Just finished Mockingjay, the last in the Hunger Games trilogy. A very quick read. I don't know what to say about the series. I enjoyed it quite a bit on the one hand, but also found it rather disturbing on the other. Especially when I consider it was written by young adults. Pretty depraved stuff in that last one...
    I thought it was a pretty good message, being used by the media and how a revolution, however justified and necessary, often doesn't change much.


    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    I gotta say, that for being a 160 year old tale it's held up remarkably well. The action just rolls along and Dumas very seldom seems to get bogged down with the laborious descriptions and exposition that's typical of literature from that era.
    Over the past couple months I worked through the 43-hour (maybe 47, I forget) unabridged audiobook for The Count of Monte Cristo. A very good reader makes for a great audiobook. I had seen several movie adaptions but had never read the text. At first I was dubious but it really grew on me after a while, there's a lot of fluff but you really start to feel for the characters. He's not fooling about the revenge parts either, much more serious than the 2002 movie for example.

    Newest audiobook is the first book of the Game of Thrones series. Liking it a lot. I can see why fantasy readers were very excited to have the series made into the cable show. I haven't seen any of the show so I will save it until I get a couple books under my belt.

    In current books I'm starting the Firestar series by Michael Flynn again, it is an excellent story of building a commercial space program and some alien mysteries. Another good single book on the same line is Kings of the High Frontier by Victor Koman. I need to get to the bookstore and find some new stuff, my pile is somewhat low.

    On the technical side it is Human Transit by Jarrett Walker. I enjoy his blog at http://www.humantransit.org/ and the book is a good distillation of his thinking.

  22. #1547
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Ben Mezrich's "Sex on the Moon"; it's a true story about a heist of moon rocks about 10 years ago. I read some really good reviews when the book came out last year and finally snagged it at the library. So far, very entertaining.

  23. #1548
    Cyburbian Coragus's avatar
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    I've never been a comic guy, but about a month ago I bought a used copy of The Watchmen and it was like a part of myself woke up and saw light for the first time. I just finished Crisis on Infinite Earths and have V for Vendetta at home.
    Back home just in time for hockey season!

  24. #1549
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Reading "The Borderland", by Edwin Shrake. Texas based novel with similarities to Larry McMurtry's "Lonesome Dove." otterpop would probably enjoy it, if he hasn't read it already.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

  25. #1550
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    in the past two weeks I read the following:

    Eat That Frog
    1913
    Month in Italy; and
    On Speaking Well
    Invest in the things today, that provide the returns tomorrow.

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