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Thread: What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

  1. #1551
    Cyburbian Seabishop's avatar
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    Jonathan Franzen - the Corrections

  2. #1552
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Danielle Steele's "Friends Forever". As my bookmark says, "Yes, I'm actually reading this". Formulaic, but a fun read.

  3. #1553
    Cyburbian Plus
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    Robert Sullivan's My American Revolution
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  4. #1554
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    "Where Are They Buried? How Did They Die? A Guide for Tombstone Tourists of the South" by Tod Benoit. Scored this one for 50 cents off the clearance rack at Books-A-Million today. I'm the one dragging RJ around old cemeteries we encounter on our travels...

  5. #1555
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    I just finished a book series (6 books) which I thoroughly enjoyed but wish there were more books in the series. Am delving into another where there are 4 or 5. I try to space them out by one per week. It's like getting a much-awaited book. I sometimes have to stop mid-book so I don't finish too soon

  6. #1556
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    'Abraham Lincoln Vampire Slayer' by Seth Grahame-Smith

    A fun read all the way around. I look forward to the movie.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  7. #1557
    Cyburbian dandy_warhol's avatar
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    While the World Watched by Carolyn Maull McKinstry. This is a first had account of the Birmingham church bombing that killed the 4 young girls in 1963. I knew the bombing had occurred but didn't know the specifics. Very interesting so far with lots of great excerpts from MLK jr's speeches.
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

  8. #1558
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    "The Odyssey of KP2: An Orphan Seal, a Marine Biologist, and the Fight to Save a Species" by Terrie M. Williams. So far, a good read.

    Dandy, the cute little guy on the cover of this book just might make you give up the bunnies!

  9. #1559
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    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess View post
    "The Odyssey of KP2: An Orphan Seal, a Marine Biologist, and the Fight to Save a Species" by Terrie M. Williams. So far, a good read.

    Dandy, the cute little guy on the cover of this book just might make you give up the bunnies!
    Ended up being a very good book, I learned a lot about sea mammals, and it's a quick read. Two thumbs up!

  10. #1560
    Cyburbian dandy_warhol's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess View post
    "The Odyssey of KP2: An Orphan Seal, a Marine Biologist, and the Fight to Save a Species" by Terrie M. Williams. So far, a good read.

    Dandy, the cute little guy on the cover of this book just might make you give up the bunnies!
    Oooh, sounds good! I'll have to check it out. Did you read it on your Kindle?
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

  11. #1561
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    'The Lazy Man's Guide to Enlightenment' - Thaddeus Golas
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  12. #1562
    Cyburbian dandy_warhol's avatar
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    No Longer at Ease by Chinua Achebe. Just started it last night but I enjoyed Things Fall Apart.
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

  13. #1563
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by dandy_warhol View post
    Oooh, sounds good! I'll have to check it out. Did you read it on your Kindle?
    Nah, I got the hardcover in case RJ wants to read it. Probably won't since the subject is so cute. And the battery on my kindle seems to have died. And I spilled a glass of wine into my laptop Sunday. I'm a mess technologically. Typing now on a tiny netbook in Naples.

  14. #1564
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    Just finished Jacqueline Sheehan's "Picture This"; a widow is confronted by a teenager claiming to be the widow's dead husband's daughter. Novel. A good read. Now reading Clive Cussler's "The Jungle" fomulaic, as always, but a fun story.

  15. #1565
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    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess View post
    Adriana Trigiani's "The Shoemaker's Wife". Two Italian teenagers meet in northern Italy in 1910, and for different reasons, end up in the NYC area. The boy is apprenticed to a shoemaker, the girl works in a clothing factory and lives with the distant relatives from hell. I'm about halfway thru the book, and enjoying it a lot, even though I'm not usually a big fan of historical fiction.
    Now reading "Milk Glass Moon", the third in Trigiani's Big Stone Gap novels set in NC. The librarians recommended the series after I told them how much I enjoyed "The Shoemaker's Wife".

  16. #1566
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    This month's issue of Smithsonian and the article on Thomas Jefferson the slaveowner. It is a very well researched article on Jefferson, who discovered that he yielded a four percent annual profit from the propagation of his slaves and the work of young slave boys in his nail factory. The profit from his nail factory paid for the household budget, so he could entertain his guests lavishly, supplied by a dumbwaiter that connected to the kitchen where some of his slaves worked.

    Also reading I Will Fight No More Forever, the story of the flight of the Nez Perce and Chief Joseph. It is a very good book. My only criticsm is this is a true story about the great flight of the non-treaty Nez Perce across Idaho, Wyoming and Montana, yet there isn't a map showing the path taken by the tribe and the soldiers. That I had to get off the Internet.
    Last edited by otterpop; 03 Oct 2012 at 12:24 PM.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  17. #1567
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    Just finished Leonard Wibberly's cold war classic "The Mouse That Roared"

    Currently reading "The Hunger Games"

    Next up: Clive Cussler's 'The Jungle'
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  18. #1568
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown.

    I usually read nonfiction books, but I throw in an easy-to-read fiction book every now and then to give my mind a vacation.
    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany"

  19. #1569
    Cyburbian ursus's avatar
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    I'm jealous. School's back in and my wife works at night so I'm the homework guy around our house. I'm not reading much for myself lately but I've heard a whole bunch of Junie B Jones books read to me in halting voices and read "Ricky Ricotta's Giant Mouse Robot" out loud about a billion times lately. Somebody kill me.
    "...I would never try to tick Hink off. He kinda intimidates me. He's quite butch, you know." - Maister

  20. #1570
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ursus View post
    I'm jealous. School's back in and my wife works at night so I'm the homework guy around our house. I'm not reading much for myself lately but I've heard a whole bunch of Junie B Jones books read to me in halting voices and read "Ricky Ricotta's Giant Mouse Robot" out loud about a billion times lately. Somebody kill me.
    I feel your pain, dude. There was a time when I could practically recite Horton Hatches The Egg from memory. That and Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel.

    Reading Rama II as my son's bedtime story.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  21. #1571
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by otterpop View post
    I feel your pain, dude. There was a time when I could practically recite Horton Hatches The Egg from memory. That and Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel.
    I have a great video of my son at age 4, "reading" Mike Mulligan to me. If he didn't every word down pat, he came pretty darn close.

    Me, now reading Southern Living's "Big Book of Slow Cooking".

  22. #1572
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    "Rules of Civility" by Amor Towles. Novel, set in late '30's in NYC, a secretary and her friend begin interacting with the affluent in Manhattan. A good read.

  23. #1573
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    Quote Originally posted by btrage View post
    The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown.

    I usually read nonfiction books, but I throw in an easy-to-read fiction book every now and then to give my mind a vacation.
    I hear you. It feels at times like you almost have to apologize for reading something like Clive Cussler, Dan Brown, or especially young adult fiction like Harry Potter or Hunger Games.

    I read some books that many would consider intellectually dense, but see nothing wrong whatsoever with reading for the purposes of entertainment or escape. Balance is the key, and eating an occasional Big Mac or reading the occasional Clive Cussler book never killed anyone.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  24. #1574
    Cyburbian ursus's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post

    I read some books that many would consider intellectually dense, .
    I've been called both intellectual and dense, but never at the same time.
    "...I would never try to tick Hink off. He kinda intimidates me. He's quite butch, you know." - Maister

  25. #1575
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    I hear you. It feels at times like you almost have to apologize for reading something like Clive Cussler, Dan Brown, or especially young adult fiction like Harry Potter or Hunger Games.
    In your honor, I picked up a Clive Cussler at the library today: "The Tombs", Fargo series. I've been reading Cussler for 30 years and I don't care if anyone doesn't consider it deep enough. I just can't get into his Isaac Bell series, though.

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