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Thread: What are we reading right now? (Planning related or not)

  1. #1626
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess View post
    I'm thinking about making a list of all the books I read this year. I haven't done that since elementary school.
    I started doing this in 1982. I have a book of lists - different beers I've sampled and books I've read. To compile the list I backtracked and tried to remember the books I read prior to the list and came up with 99 (I didn't count "children's books"). Number 100, the book that began the official count was The World According to Garp.. Been a lot of books recorded since then. The years 2001-2004 were low producers - my son was a wee guy then, took a lot of attention, and was much more entertaining than reading a book. 2012 was my best year ever - 29 books.

    Right now I am reading The Pumpkin Rollers, by Elmer Kelton. I was reading No Country for Old Men, but can't find where I last put it down.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  2. #1627
    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    Novelist Richard Russo's new memoir, Elsewhere. I gave the book to hubby for Christmas and he finished it in record time; now it's my turn to read it.

  3. #1628
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Tim Dorsey's "Riptide ultra-glide". Hysterically funny, as he always is. Just reading the dust jacket made me laugh. A top Florida author.

  4. #1629
    Cyburbian Seabishop's avatar
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    Timothy Ferris - Coming of Age in the Milky Way. So far a very readable book about the history of astronomy and our knowledge of the universe. I'm afraid the astrophysics will soon be over my head.

  5. #1630
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    William Kuhn's "Mrs Queen Takes the Train". It's an amusing novel with the "what if?" premise of Queen Elizabeth being a bit dispirited, finding herself in a borrowed stablekeeper's hoodie outside Buckingham Palace, and heading off on a nostalgic visit. Pursued thereafter by quirky palace staff and a guy from a cheese shop. Not a crazy-whacky novel like Carl Hiaasen. Serious at times, but very inventive and entertaining. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and I don't say that often.

  6. #1631
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by btrage View post
    I'm still reading the 3rd Teddy Roosevelt book.

    I also just started reading the first Harry Potter novel. Yeah, I'm a little behind the times on this one.
    I finished the first Harry Potter book a month or so ago. I was not impressed. But I will continue to read the series. My 9 year old daughter read it as well, so now we need to start watching the movies. She's already started in on the 2nd book.

    I finished the last book in the Roosevelt trilogy earlier this week. My favorite part of the book was seeing how much our current day political atmosphere grew out of the 1890 - 1920 period.

    I'm now reading The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest., the third book in that trilogy. I want to be friends with Lisbeth Salander. Maybe more.
    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany"

  7. #1632
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    Lisa Gardner books - which is not smart when you live alone in a sleepy small town in a creaky house...

  8. #1633
    Cyburbian Planit's avatar
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    The Foursome by Troon McAllister.

    A good little book in the 3-part Eddie Caminetti series. Insightful too looking into one's personalities.
    "Whatever beer I'm drinking, is better than the one I'm not." DMLW
    "Budweiser sells a product they reflectively insist on calling beer." John Oliver

  9. #1634
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by luckless pedestrian View post
    Lisa Gardner books - which is not smart when you live alone in a sleepy small town in a creaky house...
    Haha. The first time I read "The Shining" I was 22, living alone, and there was a hideous thunderstorm raging all evening. Silly me.

  10. #1635
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    LOL ZG -

    Maister - I can't believe you are trying to tempt me to FAC by starting a thread on my Lisa Gardner obsession...you cad!

    actually right now I am reading a book called "Maine" (duh) by J Courtney Sullivan

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/12/bo...anted=all&_r=0

    I need to feed the soap opera buff in me given I don't watch tv during the week and only watch The Good Wife for my fix on Sunday (and Downton Abbey on Hulu)

  11. #1636
    Cyburbian Plus Whose Yur Planner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by btrage View post
    I I'm now reading The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest., the third book in that trilogy. I want to be friends with Lisbeth Salander. Maybe more.
    That's one of the books I'm reading now. Interesting book and and interesting look into that culture.
    When did I go from Luke Skywalker to Obi-Wan Kenobi?

  12. #1637
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    "The Good Girls Revolt" by Lynn Povich. In 1970, 46 female staffers at Newsweek filed a lawsuit against the news magazine, alleging sex discrimination in hiring and promoting; the author was one of them. It was followed the next few years by similar lawsuits against other news organizations. The Newsweek lawsuit was filed the same day the magazine cover story was "Women in Revolt", written by a newspaper reporter since Newsweek had no female writers at the time. This was only a decade before I graduated college and got my first professional job, and it is amazing, reading about the crap they dealt with.

  13. #1638
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Christopher Buckley's "Boomsday". The premise of this novel is Congress triples taxes for young workers to continue entitlements for aging baby boomers, and there's a revolt starting with the destruction of golf courses in retirees' gated communities. So far, it's hilarious.

  14. #1639
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Re-reading a classic, Elvis Is Dead and I Don't Feel So Good Myself by Lewis Grizzard. I'd almost forgotten how funny the guy was.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

  15. #1640
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    I am currently between books, and that's a place I have not been at for more than a day or two in a long long time, but I'm going on three weeks now. Kinda strange, really.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  16. #1641
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    I am finishing up Maine: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/12/bo...anted=all&_r=0

    In cue I have Lisa Gardner's Touch and Go: http://www.amazon.com/Touch-Go-Lisa-.../dp/0525953078

    and Failure is not an option by my secret love/mentor Gene Kranz (no, really): http://www.amazon.com/Failure-Not-Op.../dp/1439148813

  17. #1642
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ofos View post
    Re-reading a classic, Elvis Is Dead and I Don't Feel So Good Myself by Lewis Grizzard. I'd almost forgotten how funny the guy was.
    My son was a toddler, and we'd just left a friend's home in Atlanta, heading for Gatlinburg, when it came on the radio that Lewis Grizzard had died. So sad. Heart trouble, I think. I have that book, too, and it's one of my favorites,

  18. #1643
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Like otterpop, I am invariably reading several books at the same time. Just kind of leave them in various locations and pick them up when I'm there. At the moment, I'm in the middle or toward the end of books by Lewis Grizzard (Elvis is Dead...), Tony Hillerman (Fallen Man), and Garrison Keilor (Tales of Lake Wobegon). Now I've started PrairyErth by William Least Heat-Moon. Read Blue Highways a number of years ago, enjoyed it and thought it was time to pick up another of his books.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

  19. #1644
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ofos View post
    ..and Garrison Keilor (Tales of Lake Wobegon).
    Hey, by sheer coincidence I started Lake Wobegon Days this weekend.

  20. #1645
    Cyburbian ursus's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    Hey, by sheer coincidence I started Lake Wobegon Days this weekend.
    I wanted to get that. Tell me if I still do. Can you give an opinion only a few chapters in?
    "...I would never try to tick Hink off. He kinda intimidates me. He's quite butch, you know." - Maister

  21. #1646
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ursus View post
    I wanted to get that. Tell me if I still do. Can you give an opinion only a few chapters in?
    It was Keillor at his finest. Read it. You would like it, I promise.

    Just started: "The Revenge of Geography" by Robert Kaplan. Only one chapter in and I can already tell this is going to be a keeper.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  22. #1647
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    I am now onto the 2nd Potter book. My daughter is on the 4th. As far as fantasy books go, I am really surprised that so many adults were fans of this series, especially since it centers on children. Very boring.

    We are watching the movies as we finish the books.
    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany"

  23. #1648
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by btrage View post
    I am now onto the 2nd Potter book. My daughter is on the 4th. As far as fantasy books go, I am really surprised that so many adults were fans of this series, especially since it centers on children. Very boring.

    We are watching the movies as we finish the books.
    I've read them and seen the movies. The plots and the content improve as the kids age. They'll never be great works of fiction but as fantasy escape literature, they're not bad.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

  24. #1649
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Just finished a free novel from Amazon Prime: Village Books, by Craig McLay. Very amusing, great characters, the goings-on at a bookstore on the verge of closing. No, not like "You've Got Mail". I really enjoyed it.

    Now I'm into Randy Wayne White's latest Doc Ford novel, "Night Moves", partially about Flight 19 that disappeared from Ft Lauderdale in the '40's; but, of course, about so much more. He's one of my favorite FL authors.

  25. #1650
    Cyburbian Masswich's avatar
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    The Lobster Coast, a history of Maine with a particular emphasis on how and why it split from Massachusetts, and on the fishing industry. Apparently lobsters did well because (a) they are little vermin and (b) they actually managed the stock at an earlier date and without interference from international trawlers. Also a lot of information about how and why the cities and towns of the coast were developed.

    Apparently Monhegan Island trumps Plymouth by far in terms of its role in the colonization of America.

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