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Thread: US guest worker proposal

  1. #1

    hopefully you guys enjoy this article

    i ran into this article , take a read

    article

    After reading the article, do you think the proposed "guest worker" visa would help U.S. cities attract productive immigrant workers to expand their economies? Or do you think the disadvantages would outweigh the benefits to the U.S.?

    I think that The proposal to create a new guest worker status will be a step in the right direction for our government's problem with illegal aliens in the U.S. There are many illegal aliens who live in fear of being discovered. I question, though if this is a proposal to give them a window of opportunity to live as legal citizens, or one that may just get them to apply to only be sent back to their country of origin? This bill clearly needs additional protection for the illegal alien workers who risk deportation if they sign up for the new guest worker status from the immigration. I question also why the illegals must wait an additional three year period to apply for citizenship under this proposal.They are usually hard working people, who are otherwise law abiding residents of the U.S.

    let me know what u think

    here is the text of the article incase the link does not work

    GUEST WORKER PROPOSALS FACE BIG HURDLES
    By Stephen Dinan
    THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Mexico's foreign minister will meet with members of Congress this week, and one topic of discussion will be allowing more Mexicans to live and work in the United States as part of a guest-worker program.
    Guest workers are the hot topic in immigration right now, with politicians from border states calling on Congress to stem the tide of illegal immigrants dying as they try to cross the U.S.-Mexico border while addressing the economic situation that draws the immigrants.
    The bill would create two categories of visa one for foreigners who want to enter the United States to work, and the other for illegal immigrants already holding jobs here.
    The new foreign workers would have to be matched with an employer and would have a chance to earn permanent residence at the end of a three-year work period. Meanwhile, those already here illegally would have to pay a fine and work for two three-year periods before applying for legal residency.
    Sen. John Cornyn, Texas Republican, also introduced a plan in July that would let foreigners apply to work on a year-to-year basis for up to three years, but would withhold part of their earnings to be repaid when they return to their country. It also emphasizes stricter enforcement to catch those trying to cheat the system.
    Mr. Cornyn and the Arizona group have put forth their plans as reasonable solutions to economic needs as well as homeland security.
    But opponents on both sides of the general immigration debate say that guest-worker programs are destined to fail.
    According to a 2000 report for the Center for Immigration Studies, guest-worker programs implemented in the middle of the last century were accompanied by illegal immigration usually from family and friends following the guest workers.
    On the other side is the National Immigration Forum, which advocates for immigrants' rights, and which praised Mr. Kolbe and his colleagues for introducing the bill but added that it doesn't go far enough.
    They demanded stronger worker protections, doubted whether the plan would succeed in matching employees to employers, and said it also must allow for the guest workers' families to come to the United States.
    Any guest-worker plan, though, must clear some big hurdles, particularly in the House. The chairmen of the Judiciary Committee and its immigration subcommittee have questioned the need and potential for success of guest-worker programs.

  2. #2
    No system is going to satisfy either side of this issue. I think guest worker thing is a good idea. In theory it probably makes working conditions better for immigrants and lets government keep tabs on employers and, treating immigrants more respectfully could be an outcome of such a program. But a direct and realistic response to what I just said is that employers don't and won't hire documented guest workers if it means they have to afford these people civil working conditions, especially in pay. Illegal immigration is so useful to employers because there is essentailly no government interference, very little. Lets face it, life in Mexico just sucks for the majority and if I was a Mexican I'd look gleefully to el norte for work with or without the guest worker permit.

    Mexico's foreign minister will meet with members of Congress this week, and one topic of discussion will be allowing more Mexicans to live and work in the United States as part of a guest-worker program.
    I wonder what the ministers ideal number of Mexicans living in the US is? I suspect large enough to cut back Mexico's already stingy federal spending on its undesirables, like Oaxacan indians who wont shut up about their lack of representation in DF, or hardworking taxpaying Tijuana residents who desperately need better infrastructure -to cite some examples. Of course the Minister might want to consider that the US has an idealistic and practical responsibility to be fair and consider the worlds immigrants from the 180 other countries. Of the estimated 10 million undocumented workers in the US, 5 million are estimated to be from Mexico. In my opinion, that is way to dispraportionate. I am personally tired of DF using the US as its spicket to relieve social and economic pressures at home, it's shameful on PRI and PAN. This country has the 9th largest economy in the world -it can take better care of its people.

    There are many illegal aliens who live in fear of being discovered. I question, though if this is a proposal to give them a window of opportunity to live as legal citizens, or one that may just get them to apply to only be sent back to their country of origin?
    Your suspicions might be credible given the restrictive protocols pushed on the law enforcement community to not do its job with respect to illegal immigrants.

    I question also why the illegals must wait an additional three year period to apply for citizenship under this proposal.They are usually hard working people, who are otherwise law abiding residents of the U.S.
    First of all I'll generalize with you that most folks are hard working and law abiding, after all most of these people are coming to the USA to escape low wages,unemployment and corruption, it is more than a breath of fresh air to get away from any of those situations. Most people in this country are law abiding as well and respect the law. The law against illegal immigration is pretty high up on the country agenda these days. Many folks don't think people should be rewarded for breaking the immigration law, no matter what their plight from home is, or what their contribution to society has been. It seems harsh but it's a fair generalization of what many people think.

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