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    Published on 04 Jun 2012 8:00 AM
    Categories:
    1. Transportation
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    by Erin Chantry

    "Who the heck invited the DOT?"

    This was John Moore's question to the audience this past week at CNU 20 during the presentation he entitled, "Not Your Grandfather's DOT," as part of the Balanced Roads to Transit-Oriented Development session. His question to the audience was humorous because traffic engineers have gained the reputation in the past as being insensitive and unaware to the many street design qualities required by the CNU Charter and the Complete Streets movement. Moore from District 5 of the Florida Department of Transportation wasn't the only one creating buzz about how the DOT is moving forward to complete streets. Billy Hattaway, the Secretary of District 1, was also present at CNU20, speaking about the Traditional Neighborhood Development (TND) Chapter in the Roadway Design Green Book that goes live today. Hattaway's continual presence at CNU and Moore's presentation show that there is a shift that is beginning to occur within the transportation engineering community. ...
    Published on 09 May 2012 7:00 AM
    Categories:
    1. Transportation
    2. Urban Design
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    Stroskey writes:

    It seems no matter who or what is being constructed or renovated, contractors, owners, and everyone involved in a building project objects to sidewalks being built. It feels like despite all of our regulations regarding storm water runoff, fire codes, etc. sidewalks get the most backlash. I've had people build in a neighboring town because they didn't require sidewalks (the owners didn't realize fuel costs in the long run were a lot more), and I've had people threaten anything they could so they don't have to put in sidewalks. Why the aversion, and are your communities like this? We had one man at a public meeting even say, "We don't need sidewalks. People walk in the street." ...
    Published on 02 Feb 2012 7:00 AM
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    1. Transportation
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    Fringe writes:

    A property owner whose two parcels are slated to be cut in two, leaving three remnants, by a state highway widening and relocation project was visited two full years ago by an appraiser, who said highway reps would be visiting soon to negotiate. No more, however, and the silence has been deafening. ...
    Published on 27 Dec 2011 7:00 AM
    Categories:
    1. Transportation

    MacheteJones writes:

    We're working on a climate action plan in the community I plan for, and one of the draft recommendations that I proposed for the plan would be for the municipality to create a bicycle and pedestrian web page that would contain recommended bike routes on low traffic streets, point out areas with sidewalks, and have information on the health and environmental benefits of walking and biking.

    I presented this concept to my planning director and was shot down on account that such a website would create a potential liability for the municipality - reason being that if someone were to get hurt while following one of the recommended routes, the municipality could be subect to a lawsuit. Is there a way to do this while reducing the lawsuit risk, or is the only way to pull this off to create a full-blown bike/ped plan with screenline counts, consultant engineers, and the works? Thanks, everyone.
    ...
    Published on 21 Dec 2011 7:00 AM
    Categories:
    1. Transportation
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    WSU MUP Student writes:

    For the past few years there has been a lot of effort and resources put into the development of a light rail system for the City of Detroit. About a year or so ago (I cannot recall exactly when), the various plans began to coalesce and a final plan was released which would be a line running up and down the center of Woodward Avenue (the Main Street for Detroit and its northern suburbs) from just outside of downtown eventually to 8 Mile Road (the northern city limit). Once downtown, the line would make a bit of a loop through the central area. The rail line was going to be paid for through a combination of federal and private grants, city and state funding, and a small coalition of wealthy private donors. ...
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