1893 Columbian Exposition - Chicago

H

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#1
did the "White City" or "Grey City" from the World' s Fair burn during the Chicago Fire?
 

iamme

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#2
The great Chicago Fire was in 1871. The exposition was in 1893. I thought they disassembled it afterward.
 

mgk920

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#3
iamme said:
The great Chicago Fire was in 1871. The exposition was in 1893. I thought they disassembled it afterward.
IIRC, those buildings sat derelict for several years and then burned. From what I have read, it was a pretty spectacular fire.

Mike
 

boiker

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#5
I know that the church in the white city was disassembled and re-assembled in my hometown. In the 60s, the church using the building felt it was prudent to tear down the structure and erect a new "modern" church on the same site.
 

Jack

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#7
What I've heard/read is the same as mgk920, most of it burned down.

A few buildings did survive, though. The Palace of Fine Arts building became the Museum of Science and Industry, but the exterior had to be rebuilt in stone in either the 1920's or 30's in order to keep it from deteriorating (the buildings were originally made of plaster).
 

mendelman

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#8
Jack said:
...but the exterior had to be rebuilt in stone in either the 1920's or 30's in order to keep it from deteriorating (the buildings were originally made of plaster).
Jack,
You're right except that the Fine Arts/Museum of Science and Industry building was originally built with stone. It was intended to be the only permanent structure from the beginning.
 

Jack

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#9
mendelman said:
Jack,
You're right except that the Fine Arts/Museum of Science and Industry building was originally built with stone. It was intended to be the only permanent structure from the beginning.
I originally thought that, but later came upon various sites like this one. They all said the exterior ornament was made of the same plaster material as the other buildings even though it was intended to be fireproof.
 

mendelman

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#10
Jack said:
I originally thought that, but later came upon various sites like this one. They all said the exterior ornament was made of the same plaster material as the other buildings even though it was intended to be fireproof.
Thank you for clarifying that for me. Chicago Landmarks website is a reliable source, I guess. ;-) :)
 

Jack

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#11
mendelman said:
Thank you for clarifying that for me. Chicago Landmarks website is a reliable source, I guess. ;-) :)
I figured I'd link to the website with the most impressive sounding name and address. After all, you just gotta believe a website when it has that many dots in the URL. :-D

What's the name of the town where the church was relocated?
 

mendelman

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#12
Jack said:
I figured I'd link to the website with the most impressive sounding name and address. After all, you just gotta believe a website when it has that many dots in the URL. :-D

What's the name of the town where the church was relocated?
boiker is in Peoria, IL.
 

Cardinal

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#13
Many of the buildings were at least partially diasmantled. My former office contained several plaster friezes from the Columbian Exposition, based on Greek temples.
 

jordanb

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#18
City of the Century (a nonfiction book about 1900s Chicago) had a description of what happened after the exposition. I do know many of the buildings were taken down and (appearently) moved. Some English guy came over specifically to fight to keep the buildings from all being torn down but, failing at that, he took up urban reform after seeing how the working man lived in Chicago and died on the Titanic while making one of his many trans-atlantic trips fighting the Man.

At least one building did burn down, probably as the result of arson during the 1894 depression. I can't remember the details though.

One building from the fair does still stand at the site. The Palace of Fine Arts was built out of stone instead of wood and plaster to protect the priceless works that were on display in it during the fair. It is now the Museum of Science and Industry.
 

Wannaplan?

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#19
michaelskis said:
I am guessing it is Fiction?
It is not. In fact, it is a dramatic retelling of real events that led up to the 1893 Columbian Exposition, intertwining the histories of an architect and a killer.
 

jordanb

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#20
It's "non-fiction" like The Perfect Storm is "non-fiction." It's history with creative license added.
 
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