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4/15/04 noontime question from Michaelskis.

michaelskis

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Today’s question is in honor of traveling.

When you travel someplace by car, do you drive right there in as short of time as you can, or do you take your time, and try to see as much as possible.

Today I am going to the Upper Peninsula to visit friends and family for a long weekend.
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
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For this question, I will give the ultimate "planner answer."

It depends.
 

Zoning Goddess

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I try to avoid the interstates, if I have the time, and take the backwoods roads instead. It's a lot more relaxing and I like seeing the small towns, more scenic views, etc.
 

Repo Man

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I geuss it all depends. If I am going somewhere with lots of attractions on the way, I will take my time. Sometimes I will see something and pass it up, but make a point to allow more time on the way back or on the next trip to check it out. When I travel around Wisconsin I will look at a map and check out websites to see if there are any cool attractions in some small towns. How else would one discover the Mount Horeb Mustard Museum
 

boiker

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If I have to make time, expressway it is.

If I don't have any time to make, i take backroads, gravel roads, unmarked roads.. eventually, i'll get where I'm going.

You really see the country when your on travel on state, county, and us highways.
 

ludes98

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I traveled alot for a previous job, so I can say both. I definitely prefer the more scenic routes, but I tend to get more tickets on those routes too.
 

Seabishop

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I like to check out places along the way (if I have time). Its a good way to see smaller cities you wouldn't ordinarily make a point to travel to. As a matter of fact I plan on checking out Portsmouth NH on my way to Maine tomorrow. :)
 

biscuit

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As previously stated, it just depends.

If it's a drive I frequently make, like between here and SC, then I'll take the interstates and try to beat my best driving time (600 miles in 7.5 hours... I won't mention how fast you have to drive to do that o:) ). Given the opportunity and time however I will take the back roads and try to see as much of the countryside as possible. That said, my propensity to meander has not come without a price. One of the first fights me and the future Mrs. Had was ever had was when I decided to take back roads through the mountains of West Virginia and she decided to get really car sick. Needless to say, exploring the scenic routes of America became a purely solo event after that.
 

NHPlanner

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Seabishop said:
As a matter of fact I plan on checking out Portsmouth NH on my way to Maine tomorrow. :)
You'll like Portsmouth.....be sure to stop at Strawberry Banke if you have the time.
 
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Mud Princess

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Seabishop said:
I like to check out places along the way (if I have time). Its a good way to see smaller cities you wouldn't ordinarily make a point to travel to. As a matter of fact I plan on checking out Portsmouth NH on my way to Maine tomorrow. :)
Portsmouth is a really nice place to stop on the way to Maine -- definitely worth a visit!

A few years ago we had the dumb-ass idea of taking the "scenic route" to Maine via back roads, instead of the interstate. I don't remember how long it took, but I do recall that driving on windy roads behind slow logging trucks made me carsick, and I was thoroughly cranky by the time we reached Maine. We stick to the interstate route now (was in Maine last weekend, as a matter of fact).

That said, I do like the scenic routes in some cases. When we went to Scotland, for example, I wanted to see as much as possible, and didn't mind the "single track" roads at all.
 

GeogPlanner

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NHPlanner said:
It depends.
Ditto.

Although I have learned it is much shorter and about the same timewise to go from Albany to Manchester NH via the back roads (not the Pike) so sometimes I take the back way in just out of curiosity. But like I said, depends, time being the biggest factor.
 

Gedunker

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Having been an over-the-road driver, I hate getting from here to there. For me, it's beeline the interstate to my destination. I have also mastered the art of "holding it" such that I only stop for fuel, refreshments and wc break. Then it's back to putting miles behind me.

Having said that, my travelling companions include Mrs. G and the G-ettes, ages 4 and 7. I have some work to do in training them to my way of travel ;-)
 

jestes

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It depends.
I concur.

Oops I was just told that my original message was too short, that it must contain at least 10 characters. :-0 I guess the post padding police (PPP?) are alive and well. So, I will elaborate...It depends on where I am going, what I have to do when I get there and how late I am.
 

Tranplanner

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Another one for the "it depends" option. If I'm travelling to a specific destination, I go bat-outta-hell like until I'm there. If I'm on vacation, or "exploring", I try to stick to the back roads (specifically those that parallel railway lines).
 

mendelman

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Time dependent and the route I am taking.

Mostly when we go for long drives it's to our parents' places in Michigan and we know that there isn't much interesting on that route, so it is I-94 speed for us.

Though this past weekend, we did stop in Ann Arbor for lunch and a nice walk.

One of these days, I'd like to take US-12 from Chicago to Ann Arbor. I-94 gets pretty boring if you do it too often.
 

Cardinal

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I'll usually take the shortest, fasted route to my destinations in the western states, or through parts of the country I am familiar with. Other times I will make a diversion. This past trip to New Mexico was a two-laner about 90% of the time. The only exceptions were to Missouri, around Kansas City, from Santa Fe to Colorado, a short stretch in Kansas, then Missouri, Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin on the way home.

Traveling the back roads is a good way to get a feel for the country. I was impressed by how nice some of the cities in Kansas looked. I was amazed at the poor condition of roads in Missouri. I slept in a hotel across from the "hanging tree" in one New Mexico city. I missed smacking a deer by about one deer length.
 

freewaytincan

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NHPlanner said:
For this question, I will give the ultimate "planner answer."

It depends.
Actually, that's the best answer. On my way to Huntsville, for example, I like to get there as quickly as possible, because from my house to my brother's, it's a good three hours. I used to take TX-75, because it was nicer looking and had less traffic, but now that far too many people have "discovered" it as well, and of course with the accident I had, it's just not worth it, much less a time-saver. Now then, on my Pittsburgh trip, going from Dallas to Memphis, then to Staunton is tedious, boring, and kind of depressing, with the lack of anything outside. However, once I get to the area around Staunton and into Pennsylvania, it's wonderful. Same goes for driving to Colorado Springs from Dallas. Man oh man, that's an entire day just to get to the northwest corner of the Panhandle, but once you get to Pueblo, it's much more fun. This is even true for my local area, even coming home from school. That simply depends on my mood, and if I want to go on a photo shoot.

Of course, I'm the type that if I can avoid driving (both in the sense of being the driver and travelling in a car period), I'll do it.
 

jsk1983

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I try to take the backroads if possible. Though it can be time consuming, although that is largely in part to all the sprawl that pops up outside any town of size. I know the interstates are alot quicker but I can't stand driving with all the trucks and other traffic, plus they are just so boring that it mentally seems to take a long time. I go to school (Binghamton) about 220 miles from home(Buffalo), so I often like to travel the backroads, especially through the finger lakes.
 

JNL

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Recently I took a road trip by myself - about a day's worth of driving. I took the direct route but had a couple of longish stops on the way. I had lunch (fish 'n chips)at an outdoor cafe and walked on the beach for a while before continuing on.
 

Miles Ignatius

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Make Mine Long & Slow

Good thread and question!

I've had too many trips where I was trying to beat the clock and the calendar so my preferred transit is secondary, non-Interstate routes, like those depicted in William Least Heat Moon's Blue Highways.

Obviously, rhar's not always possible, so I'm doomed to taking I-25 with the speed zealots, who do above 85mph in a 75mph zone.

It wasn't supposed to be like this.
 

JNA

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I have travelled both styles:
Direct, stop only for when you absolutely must, and feel beat up and sore.

Stop - get off the interstate - take your time to see, learn, experience something.
Good example driving back from NJ stopped a few times:
Newark, Ohio home of the Longaberger Basket Company;
Zanesville, Ohio where there is the "Y" Bridge with a traffic light at the junction of the legs;
Outside of Cincinnati, visited with a friend who just happens to be a Pastor;
In Louisville, KY visited an old family friend (No it wasn't Gedunker)

Every time through Columbus, Ohio I stop at "Tim Horton's" for a couple of Muffins. :)

William Least Heat Moon's Blue Highways - good book to read.
 

Wulf9

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I always leave later than I should, so I'm always the shortest time possible.

That being said, I do like to take the same route to distant places because things change with the seasons and over time. I remember going through Utah when the Great Salt Lake was flooded and watching it retreat over a period of years. (I know, not fun to most, but interesting to a planner.)
 
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