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A Checklist for Conducting Design Review?

CAPlanner1

Member
Messages
20
Points
2
Hullo Throbbing Brain,

A question for y'all concerning the magical process of architectural and design review...

A municipal client of mine is attempting to refine the skills of their planning staff in this area and wondered if there exist any uniform or otherwise standardized lists of items a counter-person or other reviewer might utilize when conducting this vital aspect of project approval.

Any help, as always is greatly appreciated!
 

SGB

Cyburbian
Messages
3,388
Points
26
CAPlanner1 said:
A municipal client of mine is attempting to refine the skills of their planning staff in this area and wondered if there exist any uniform or otherwise standardized lists of items a counter-person or other reviewer might utilize when conducting this vital aspect of project approval.
The ever-popular short answer: No.

Review lists for project review are typically based on the standards outlined in the local codes. If a desired standard isn't in the local code, the planning staff and commission would be on shaky ground trying to review for it.
 

ambmason

Cyburbian
Messages
46
Points
2
design criteria

Regarding historic districts:
For information on design guidelines contact the National Alliance of Preservation Commissions or for information on the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation look to the National Park Service website. They have a very informative "test" that might help staff and board members understand them.

For other areas, be sure that the code has authorized this kind of review and at least has some kind of generic statement on what the review is looking for; building materials, height, etc. If possible try for something a little more specific, i.e. no metal facades on street-side elevations, or all building to be at least 60% brick. With us this usually varies for each planned development (the only non-historic areas that require this kind of review). We can make suggestions to the applicant based on the precedent we have seen- but as with all such developments they are open to apply for what they want- but the Commission just has the final say.
 
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