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A Little Advice & Love Those Opinions!

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We will just get right to the point....My wife and I are from a small town in northern kansas and was wanting to move to a bigger city on the east coast, where we can have more opportunities for jobs and colleges. I am spanish and i'm looking for a city where bilinguals have more opportunities for jobs, my wife wants to go to college, so we are also looking for a city who has good colleges with a wide variety of options, since my wife does not yet know what she wants to go in for. So, we are hoping for some opinions on where not to go and where might be the best to check out. Any place really you can advise us on, but we are thinking more of the east coast. So, give us your feedback!
 
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biscuit

Cyburbian
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Well there's about 14 states on the East Coast so it would help if you got a little more specific. Like what type of weather do you want? Do you want to live in the country, in a city, or in the burbs? Do you want to live near the ocean, in the mountains or the often flat in between?
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
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The east coast of Wisconsin (Lake Michigan) is a great spot for you to consider! You might really enjoy Milwaukee, a "fishing village" like Port Washington, or perhaps the home of the world's best football team, Green Bay.

I lived in Newport News for a while in the late 80's to 1990. I would say I had mixed feelings about it. There is a strong military presence there (which at the time included me). That can have something of a negative effect, especially around the bases. There is a rich history including Williamsburg, Yorktown, and the port cities. At the time, housing seemed reasonable, but I understand it is getting up there now. I visited two years ago and saw that there is a good deal more sprawl to contend with. As far as services go, it didn't lack anything I can think of right now. Depending on where you went, you could find some of the people a bit stand-offish. These were mostly the old families that were a bit snobby. I liked that it was close to both the ocean and the Blue Ridge. By noon I could be in either place.

During the early 90's I traveled on business to a few different cities on the eastern seaboard, in Massachussetts, Connecticut, and Florida. Stay away from Springfield, MA! I hate to say it, but Massachussetts people were not among the more friendly people I dealt with. Connecticut was nice. Florida was alright, but you need to be able to deal with the summer heat and senior citizens (especially driving).


Now that I think of it, you might want to check out communities like Charlottesville and Blacksburg in Virginia. Neither is very large, but both have universities and offer many features you would not expect to find in a community of their size.
 

Gedunker

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I grew up in New Jersey (do I hear chortling?). Although the sterotype of New Jersey is often true, it is also a state of geographic, racial/ethnic, economic and cultural diversity. Like most northeastern states, it is extremely expensive as far as cost of living is concerned.

I lived briefly in southern Maine and found it very much to my liking. I would probably have stayed if it had not been for problems (not of my making) at the small college I attended. I would live there again were the opportunity to present itself.

I lived for 4 years in the Pocono mountain region of Pennsylvania. This region now is a virtual exurb of New York City. It is a beautiful area although the only access to a truly urbanized area is via a drive I personally consider much too far.

As others here have stated, you should give us a little more to work with.
 

ChevyChaseDC

Cyburbian
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How about Baltimore?

The Queen City of the Upper Chesapeake Drainage Basin, otherwise known as Baltimore, Maryland, is worth a look, as is its environs.

Of all of the large northeastern metro areas, it's the most affordable. The city proper is a hodgepodge of neighborhoods, some dirty and distressed, some charming and funky, some downright swanky. The suburbs range from quaint towns and working-class enclaves, to idyllic horse country and big box sprawl, though there's less of that in Maryland, a "Smart Growth" pioneer.
 
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Well, it's not on the east coast, but Grand Rapids, MI is a really awesome city. It's often been considered one of the best cities of the Midwest. Walkable, friendly, clean.
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
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3,838
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Providence, RI - Relatively affordable, urban but compact, lot of colleges & universities to choose from, 1 hour to Boston or beaches, 3 hours to NYC, large hispanic population so lots of biligual jobs.
 
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